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Thread: Astronomy/Space Magazine for Young Kids (7-10 yr.)

  1. #1
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    Astronomy/Space Magazine for Young Kids (7-10 yr.)

    Hi Everyone - would you have any recommendations for an in-print space/astronomy magazine that is tailored for kids from around 7-10 years of age plus/minus a couple of years?

    Thanks in advance -

    Adam

  2. #2
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    Astronomy magazine has a special issue called “Astronomy for Kids” you might try, but if you have kids already interested in astronomy, I might suggest trying the regular Astronomy magazine, especially for kids more in the 9-10 age range. Frankly, I consider it a little lightweight for adults.

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  3. #3
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    I second the motion. I have been giving my now 12-year-old granddaughter my old Sky & Telescope and Astronomy magazines since she was about 5. She still has them in magazine files boxes, organized by magazine and date. At first, she only looked at the pictures, but over time she began reading the easier articles. She still skips the science-heavy articles, but she enjoys the rest.

  4. #4
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    I second the motion. I have been giving my now 12-year-old granddaughter my old Sky & Telescope and Astronomy magazines since she was about 5. She still has them all, filed by magazine and date in card stock magazine boxes. At first, she only looked at the pictures, but over time she began reading the easier articles. She still skips the science-heavy articles, but she enjoys the rest.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Astronomy magazine has a special issue called “Astronomy for Kids” you might try, but if you have kids already interested in astronomy, I might suggest trying the regular Astronomy magazine, especially for kids more in the 9-10 age range. Frankly, I consider it a little lightweight for adults.
    Adamab1973. Agreed, both are good. Sky & Tel has the monthly map of the sky and the daily positions of the moons of jupiter, which are easily visible in good binoculars...night by night changing positions.
    I would suggest amending with books by Fred Schaaf...Seeing the Sky, 100 activities..... and use a Planisphere to identify what your sky will look like night by night....hour by hour. Find a star map of the constellations, with lines drawn in, connecting shapes, then photocopy it. take a copy and slowly white out the lines, bit by bit, then have the child redraw, until she/he can connect the circumpolar constellations from memory....then it clicks in when a dark sky is seen. Good luck. pete

    Planisphere...see:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Fy3jqPbrIY
    Last edited by trinitree88; 2020-Dec-11 at 06:23 PM. Reason: link

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I don’t think there’s really anything inappropriate in the adult versions of Astronomy or S&T (maybe a few jokes or one-off comments about drinking on an eclipse trip or whatever, but nothing worse even there than you would see in a restaurant review or travel column in a mainstream magazine/newspaper) some scientific things that might be complex enough to be impenetrable or lead or questions or looking things up, but I can’t recall anything from the time I’ve been reading that I wouldn’t have wanted a little kid to see.
    Last edited by KaiYeves; 2020-Dec-11 at 07:06 PM.
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  7. #7
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    I didn’t mention S&T only because it feels to me to be a bit more oriented towards the serious amateur astronomer than Astronomy magazine, and might not engage interest quite so much. But there’s no reason not to try both and see how children react to them.

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  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone for the feedback and great advice. I'll go with Astronomy magazine!

    Cheers all!

    - Adam

  9. #9
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    You’re welcome and thanks for *your* feedback. Too often, folks ask a question and then never return so we don’t even know if they checked back for responses.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

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