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Thread: SpaceX / Inspiration4 mission - all civilian

  1. #1
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    SpaceX / Inspiration4 mission - all civilian

    The SpaceX thread is up to 148 posts, and counting, so I thought a separate thread for the Inspiration4 mission might make sense. If not, please merge.

    The mission is being paid for by billionaire Jared Isaacman, the founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments. And of course he is on the mission too.

    The expedition is part of a charity initiative to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Issacman is apparently donating $100 million to St. Jude and donating the other three seats in the Dragon to crewmembers who will be specially selected for the humanitarian flight. The only passenger announced so far is Hayley Arceneaux, a 29-year-old Physicians' Assistant at St. Jude Hospital. Arceneaux spent part of her childhood fighting bone cancer at St. Jude. The other two crew members are supposed to be announced next Sunday afternoon.

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    Inspiration4 passenger assignments

    Spacecraft Commander: Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments and an experienced pilot

    Chief Medical Officer: Hayley Arceneaux, "St. Jude ambassador"

    Spaceflight Participant 1: TBA

    Spaceflight Participant 2: TBA

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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Inspiration4 passenger assignments

    Spacecraft Commander: Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments and an experienced pilot
    Well, we would certainly hope, given the circumstances...
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    Interview with Hayley Arceneaux. Seems like a neat lady.

    LINK
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    It is just so great seeing commercial orbital flights about to begin. I wonder who will start offering real space flight lotteries? I never put money into lotteries, but I would for a space flight lottery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Well, we would certainly hope, given the circumstances...
    Actually, I’m curious how much aircraft pilot experience carries over and if it really is that important? Most of the flight would be handled by computer (if all goes well, pretty much all of it) and even for manual control, it isn’t much like flying a plane. Maybe a pilot would have more familiarity with the type of training they would receive versus some others and might have some experience with flight emergencies which could be important, but I expect quite a lot of non-pilots could do as well, as long as they were motivated and could handle it physically. At least for the space shuttle, it was like a plane (or glider) for part of the flight so it made more sense there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Actually, I’m curious how much aircraft pilot experience carries over and if it really is that important? Most of the flight would be handled by computer (if all goes well, pretty much all of it) and even for manual control, it isn’t much like flying a plane. Maybe a pilot would have more familiarity with the type of training they would receive versus some others and might have some experience with flight emergencies which could be important, but I expect quite a lot of non-pilots could do as well, as long as they were motivated and could handle it physically. At least for the space shuttle, it was like a plane (or glider) for part of the flight so it made more sense there.
    I'm unsure too, but I think one of the skills that might be important is quickly going through checklists to debug problems, so knowing where to look for the appropriate manual and then carefully and calmly going through the checklist to see what you have to do.
    As above, so below

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    And knowledge of the airflight principle "no problem is so bad that you cannot make it worse" also translates well to spaceflight.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    You only have a few days left to try and win a chance to go to space on the SpaceX Inspiration4 mission, which is scheduled to launch to Earth orbit in late 2021. Until the end of this week, go to the Inspiration4 website to win one of its two final seats, along with billionaire and commander Jared Isaacman and Hayley Arceneaux, a physician assistant at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee who survived bone cancer and was selected to join the mission as the crew's chief medical officer.

    https://www.space.com/spacex-inspira...tests-end-soon
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    And knowledge of the airflight principle "no problem is so bad that you cannot make it worse" also translates well to spaceflight.
    Modern aircraft certainly still require basic piloting skills but modern aircraft (with modern avionics) are almost as much about systems management as they are keeping everything straight and level. Pilots have to juggle multiple systems to make the aircraft do what they want.

    Isaacman is qualified to fly in multiple types of aircraft, including fighter jets, so he has some of the same skills as the early astronauts and the same systems management experience. That said, it's not clear how much manual control he'll have over Dragon. But if I was him I'd lobby hard for at least some opportunity to direct the capsule when on orbit.

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    Inspiration 4

    I haven't seen anything here on this. It's the first all-civilian orbital space-flight, coming up in just a few weeks. They'll be using a SpaceX Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 so it's not something that was developed just for this mission, but still much more of a space flight than the recent Branson and Bezos efforts.
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    I find it kind of exciting.
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    I believe it was mentioned in another thread but it wasn’t dedicated to the topic. Yes, it doesn’t seem to be getting as much attention as the first fully commercial crewed orbital flight should.

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    There's this thread,

    https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthr...t=Inspiration4

    and I've posted about it in the SpaceX thread. Basically, a charity fundraiser for the St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital and its satellite clinics. There will be a Netflix streaming series of the mission, and coverage in Time Magazine and other media.

    Of note is the Crew Dragon docking adapter has been removed and a transparent observation cupola installed under the nose cone.

    Inspiration4 cupola (1200x1440).jpg

    Crew Dragon Inspiration4 cupola-1280.jpg

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    Ah, my mistake, I remembered there were posts on it, but forgot the thread.

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    Obviously I didn't look back far enough! I'll report this post and see if a mod can merge the threads.
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    Five posts merged in this thread.
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    Inspiration4

    Date: September 15, 2021

    Time: TBA

    Pad: KSC LC-39A

    Crew Dragon: C207 Resilience

    Launch mass: 12,519 kg (27,600 lb)

    Booster: B1062.3

    Booster recovery: ASDS, likely A Shortfall of Gravitas

    Duration: 3 days

    Altitude: 540km (higher than ISS)

    Crew;

    Commander: Jared Isaacman (CEO of Shift4, jet pilot - shares a record for circumnavigating Earth in a light jet, which was a fundraiser for Make-a-Wish)

    Pilot: Dr. Sian Proctor (geology professor, Civil Air Patrol, NASA HI-SEAS mission)

    Chief Medical Officer: Hayley Arceneaux (Physians Assistant at St. Jude's)

    Mission specialist: Christopher Sembroski (Lockheed-Martin engineer)

    Netflix coverage trailer
    https://youtu.be/D38W150h9a4

    Haley in Crew Dragon's cupola
    1630704774374.jpg

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    Flight Readiness Review passed

    Date: Sept. 15
    Window: 0000 - 2400 Eastern

    Backup date: Sept. 16
    Window: 0000 - 2400 Eastern

    Sounds like the loopy Florida weather will set T-0
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2021-Sep-05 at 04:26 AM.

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    Axios How it happened podcast second season has interviews and discussions about the crew. Part one and two here:

    https://www.axios.com/how-it-happene...e1d6ae494.html

    https://www.axios.com/how-it-happene...f0fbea806.html

    There should be a part three next week. I’ll warn that first season is on a very different and political topic.

    I liked these interviews. One woman applied to be an astronaut with NASA but didn’t get chosen. Nonetheless, she has worked hard for it for years and is getting there a different way. Another is a young woman who has had cancer and will be the youngest person in orbit and the first with a prosthetic. When I hear something like this, I feel very happy for them, and it is great to see this finally changing so it’s not government only, but of course I would like my chance to go too, so there is that element of “If only it was me” when I listen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    … I feel very happy for them, and it is great to see this finally changing so it’s not government only, but of course I would like my chance to go too, so there is that element of “If only it was me” when I listen.
    Yes I think that ‘if only it was me’ aspect is the most significant part of this mission. I hope it goes well and they can find funders to do these regularly.

    It is also planning do some important research on human health - and orbit higher than ISS.

    https://inspiration4.com/press/inspi...rch-to-further

    The crew of Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian human spaceflight mission to orbit, announced today that they will partake in a first-of-its-kind health research initiative to increase humanity’s knowledge on the impact of spaceflight on the human body.

    Once in orbit, the crew will perform carefully selected research experiments on human health and performance, which will have potential applications for human health on Earth and during future spaceflights. Additionally, SpaceX, the Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) at Baylor College of Medicine and investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine will collect environmental and biomedical data and biological samples from Inspiration4’s four crew members before, during, and after this historic spaceflight.

    … The three-day mission will target approximately a 575 km orbit, flying farther from Earth than any human spaceflight since the Hubble Space Telescope repair missions. Inspiration4’s goal is to inspire humanity and raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Another is a young woman who has had cancer and will be the youngest person in orbit and the first with a prosthetic.
    Technically, wouldn’t Jack Lousma still be the youngest person in orbit? He went to Skylab before his tenth birthday… because he was born on Leap Day, and leaplings don’t get their tenth birthday until they’re 40. ;-)
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  22. #22
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    Netflix ✓ @netflix
    On Sept 6, you’ll meet the four civilians going into space.
    On Sept 13, you’ll see them prepare.
    On Sept 15, you’ll watch the live launch
    On Sept 30, you’ll be in space alongside them

    Countdown: Inspiration4 Mission To Space takes off next week

    https://twitter.com/netflix/status/1433444639311237126

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    IOW Netflix is airing several episodes about the mission, two available now, two just prior to launch and one late in the month with (presumably) film taken on orbit.

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    The second episode was pretty good, talking to the crew and about the risks.

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    Flying today (Sept 15) to a 575 km orbit, higher than the ISS, and the largest single-piece window ever flown (Cupola)

    WATCH LIVE: INSPIRATION 4 MISSION

    SpaceX is targeting a five-hour launch window on Wednesday, September 15, opening at 8:02 p.m. EDT (Thursday, September 16 at 00:02 UTC) for launch of the Inspiration4 mission – the world’s first all-civilian human spaceflight to orbit – aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
    >
    You can watch the live launch webcast starting about 4 hours and 15 minutes before liftoff.
    https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1438006203712356353

    SpaceX webcast
    https://youtu.be/3pv01sSq44w

    Netflix webcast, hosted by Karamo Brown and Soledad O’Brien.
    https://youtu.be/tBVqsqqm9AM

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    Do we know what kind of training, if any, the passengers have regarding operation of the ship in the unlikely event that things really go sour?

    I see that at least one passenger is an accomplished aircraft pilot.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Do we know what kind of training, if any, the passengers have regarding operation of the ship in the unlikely event that things really go sour?

    I see that at least one passenger is an accomplished aircraft pilot.
    Time published a story last month that discuses the training, which included a team-building exercise; climb Mt Rainier.

    From the start, the group’s training differed radically from that of any crew before them, and not just because they are so eclectic a band of all-civilian astronauts. There is also the compressed time frame. NASA typically takes two years or more to train a crew for a particular mission—not to mention the preceding years astronauts spend in basic training before they qualify for a given mission in the first place. The Inspiration4 crew, by contrast, got word of their selection in February, began training in early April, and are set to fly in September.

    “I’m learning how to be a system’s engineer in four months,” says Proctor. “And I’m not an engineer.”

    To make that schedule work, the crew got thrown into the deep end early, beginning their work making centrifuge runs at the National Aerospace Training and Research Center in Southampton, Pa. The SpaceX trainers sought as much verisimilitude as they could during those sessions, piping the sounds of liftoff, reentry and splashdown into the centrifuge chamber and spinning the apparatus up to the four-to-six g’s the crew will actually feel at each of those points in the flight profile. They even included the thud and rocking that they’ll experience after they hit the ocean following reentry.

    Other parts of the crew’s training regimen include 60-hour, week-long sessions at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif., where they alternate their time between simulator training and classroom work. A July morning session began with nothing more glamorous than learning how to open and close the Dragon’s forward hatch while taking care to protect the rubber seals which ring the hatch and keep it airtight from damage by dust or grit, which could lead to a deadly pressure leak. When open, the hatch must be draped with the equivalent of a sort of fitted bed sheet—decidedly low tech, albeit with a decidedly high purpose.

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    One aspect I heard in today's information, "personally" contoured seats in the capsule. If they intend on making a retail customer experience, how long does it take to personally contour a seat? And then as asked above what kind of capsule training goes into a plan for the "masses"?
    But I guess the retail part will be designated for Starship and not these smaller crew designed flights. Then that leads to how much "personal" contouring is necessary for the masses? What medical tests would be administered prior to boarding? I'm sure that there will be lots of lawyer paperwork re-leaving SpaceX from "any and all personal hazards". So much more than developing a rocket before it all goes public.

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    Duplicate post deleted.

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    Apparently views from the toilet will be spectacular.

    https://www.space.com/inspiration4-s...et-dome-window

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