Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 73

Thread: Why did we stop wearing digital watches and velcro shoes?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    5,744

    Why did we stop wearing digital watches and velcro shoes?

    Usually when a technological innovation makes life easier and simpler, we adopt it. Why not with those?
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    111
    I've never had velcro shoes, but my experience with velcro is it wears out after many uses, while shoelaces can be replaced. I don't know how well velcro fastened shoes stay tight either.

    Digital watches... I still have one. Now with everyone carrying a smartphone does anyone wear watches anymore? I rarely wear mine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,417
    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Usually when a technological innovation makes life easier and simpler, we adopt it. Why not with those?
    Cost? I recall velcro shoes being more expensive.

    And as kpatz said, useful lifetime. Replacing a shoelace is cheap and simple, new velcro has to be re-glued.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Well, people didn't stop wearing digital watches. They stopped wearing watches, apparently under the misapprehension that it's more convenient to dig out a phone and thumb it into action than to glance at a wristwatch.
    Those of us who still wear watches still wear digital watches or analogue watches, according to preference. I wear a digital watch for daily use, and an analogue clockwork watch with formal wear. I'm emotionally attached to both, and will go through a brief period of mourning when my current digital watch eventually dies.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,417
    In my experience, digital watches with their need for battery changes are no more convenient than a watch you wind.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,822
    I was just thinking that zippered sneakers were “in” when I was in Middle School and now I wear very old-school Converse that lace up. I also have a new mechanical watch I got as a birthday gift last month that I’m quite proud of.

    I think in my case it’s part of the general hipster impulse to embrace the analogue in a world where everything is becoming so virtual and quick and overstimulating. It feels calming and stabilizing to depend on something more physical and tested.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    In my experience, digital watches with their need for battery changes are no more convenient than a watch you wind.
    Photocell-powered digital watches work even during a Scottish winter. And self-winding mechanical watches work for all but the most determinedly indolent individual.

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I think in my case it’s part of the general hipster impulse to embrace the analogue in a world where everything is becoming so virtual and quick and overstimulating. It feels calming and stabilizing to depend on something more physical and tested.
    I think you'll find that's just the onset of middle age.

    (I don't think I've ever seen anyone self-identify as a hipster. [Well, not since the 1950s.] Very much a disparaging label for an out-group, in these parts. Is there a trans-Atlantic difference in usage, or are you just appropriating and rebranding the label?)

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,822
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think you'll find that's just the onset of middle age.

    (I don't think I've ever seen anyone self-identify as a hipster. (Well, not since the 1950s.) Very much a disparaging label for an out-group, in these parts. Is there a trans-Atlantic difference in usage, or are you just appropriating and rebranding the label?)

    Grant Hutchison
    Well, of course, I only self-identify as a hipster ironically.

    I don’t fit the stereotype in every way, but I do enjoy enough of the things usually associated with hipsters on this side of the Atlantic (wearing scarves and brow-line-ish glasses, drinking tea, shopping in used bookstores, reusing glass jars as cups, instant photography, getting around by bicycle, and, before I graduated, living in New York City) that I figured it was a fair enough label to adopt in a semi-comic way.
    Last edited by KaiYeves; 2021-Mar-13 at 07:37 PM.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,648
    I wear both, the watch every day
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Well, of course, I only self-identify as a hipster ironically.
    Oooh. Stacked ironies. How very post-ironic. [postironic emoji]

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,176
    I tried a digital watch but changing time(like we will do tonight) was a real hassle for me. I went back to analog self-winding, but covid has made so indolent that I stopped using it. Maybe when I get my shots (was supposed to have them last month, still waiting) I will use it again. But I flunked my eye test and lost my license, so don’t hold your breath.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    I tried a digital watch but changing time(like we will do tonight) was a real hassle for me.
    The MSF radio time signal has been solving that issue in the UK for a long time. My watch resets itself overnight. So do all the clocks in the house apart from the ancient LED one on the oven.

    Grant Hutchison

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    6,134
    Along the way in my career, I noted that the executive types wore simple, elegant, traditional wrist watches. You'd see the elaborate digital models on the people with the backpacks.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,184
    I never have worn velcro shoes. I used to wear watches. I especially liked calculator watches. My favorite was a Casio scientific calculator watch, but they stopped making it, and in general as time went on the only available calculator watches became very cheap designs that I didnít like.

    I got away from wearing a watch when I couldnít find what I liked and I realized I didnít really need one. It wasnít just the introduction of cell phones - I often have that turned off, but keep it for emergencies. Rather Iím almost always near a clock of some kind where I might need to keep track of the time. These days I often ask the computer (well, an Alexa device) to set a reminder or a timer, so I rarely even bother to check a clock when Iím waiting for something or have something to do later.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,417
    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Along the way in my career, I noted that the executive types wore simple, elegant, traditional wrist watches. You'd see the elaborate digital models on the people with the backpacks.
    Well, of course the higher-ups don't need to worry about the inconvenience of winding their own watches, they have people for that.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,882
    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Along the way in my career, I noted that the executive types wore simple, elegant, traditional wrist watches. You'd see the elaborate digital models on the people with the backpacks.
    I and a lot of people around me wear traditional wristwatches. In a sense itís fashion as well as utility. But Iíve never had one that I had to wind. They are always quartz watches with batteries.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    As above, so below

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Along the way in my career, I noted that the executive types wore simple, elegant, traditional wrist watches. You'd see the elaborate digital models on the people with the backpacks.
    In my world, the "people with the backpacks" are a long way from the nearest clock, are dressed in foul-weather gear, and have their phone wrapped in a plastic bag at the bottom of the backpack, with the aim of keeping it dry.
    So, yes, an elaborate digital model that's waterproof and incorporates a barometric altimeter and a compass.

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,960
    I've worn velcro shoes before. They were quicker & easier to don & dedon than shoes with laces, but not by a substantial margin, and less likely to snag on something, but again not by a substantial margin (especially when I got in the habit of tucking shoelaces' ends & loops into the shoes). A problem I did have with velcro sometimes was about the fact that shoes loosen with age, which I might be more sensitive to than most people, based on having once been told I keep my shoes tighter than average. As a shoe's life span passes, keeping it as tight as it feels like it should be means pulling the laces farther, or pulling the velcro straps farther. With laces, that just means you get bigger leftover ends & loops, and if that bugs you, you can get shorter ones. With velcro, it means pulling past the point where the two different sides that are supposed to stick to each other aren't touching anymore, or at least not over enough area to really grab each other, and you can't replace or reposition the straps. The result is that velcro shoes need to be replaced just because of looseness even while they're still otherwise intact, whereas shoes with laces can be kept until the rest of the shoe really starts to get worn out. (Also, I discovered that people about a decade & a half younger than me seem to think of velcro shoes as an old-people item, as in "so old you seriously have trouble tying shoelaces and need to resort to velcro just to be able to do it yourself anymore" old, so they laughed at how out-of-place they thought velcro shoes were on someone far short of that age range.)

    I also wore a watch every day for years, always digital. I stopped when two things changed for me at the same time: the prevalence of cellphones, and a switch to jobs in places that had clocks, including the one in the corner of a computer screen (as opposed to the nearest clock being miles away along gravel trails that I couldn't even start to drive on until I hiked a few hundred feet uphill just to get back to the jeep). It's not that finding clocks or pulling out the cellphone (or just picking it up off my desk) is more convenient than look at my wrist, or even as convenient; it's that having something on my wrist all the time including when I'm not looking at it bugged me just enough, particularly when it bumped or snagged on things. (...especially given that, at the time I quit wearing one, my job was neither in the woods every day nor in an office every day but split between the two, and watches are good at collecting forest debris between the watch and the skin.) I still have the watch I got most recently, to take it with me when I'm traveling and not going to turn my cellphone on for a while, but even on those trips, I'm likely to put it in a pocket or leave it behind at my tent while I'm out & about.
    Last edited by Delvo; 2021-Mar-14 at 05:02 AM.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,882
    One other thing about watches. Even though I have an iPhone, I find it easier to furtively look at my watch if Iím in a meeting and know I have to finish at some time. In other places it might be OK to just pick up your iPhone or look at the clock in the wall, but I prefer to be discreet about it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    As above, so below

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,960
    Where did the idea of replacing digital watch batteries come from? I've never had one need it even once. I've never had a watch that didn't last years & years and finally end up having something else happen to it instead, so I can't even tell how many more years it would take to run a watch battery out.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Where did the idea of replacing digital watch batteries come from? I've never had one need it even once. I've never had a watch that didn't last years & years and finally end up having something else happen to it instead, so I can't even tell how many more years it would take to run a watch battery out.
    I've replaced the battery on my watch twice. They do last years and years.

    Grant Hutchison

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,632
    Iíve joked that I will never wear Velcro or slip-on shoes in respect for my mother, who spent many, many hours teaching me how to tie my laces.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  24. #24
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    2,328
    When digital watches first came out (Texas Instruments?) I recall Johnny Carson making fun of them on the Tonight Show. He had a regular watch on one wrist and a new digital watch on his other wrist. To check the time on his regular watch he just raised his arm up and quickly glanced at the watch. To check the time on the new digital watch he had to raise his arm up and use his other hand to press the button on the watch to light up the time. In other words it took to hands to tell the time. The audience laughed at it as being extra work and a step backwards in telling the time. Not sure if that 2 handed button activated digital time telling watch has changed over the years?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    Not sure if that 2 handed button activated digital time telling watch has changed over the years?
    The two-handed thing was a feature of the old red-LED watches, which used a lot of power from batteries with more limited energy storage than are now available. I think the display would also probably have faded and died after a while if it was left on all the time.
    They were a short-lived phenomenon, replaced with LCDs with a continuous display by the late '70s.

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,743
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’ve joked that I will never wear Velcro or slip-on shoes in respect for my mother, who spent many, many hours teaching me how to tie my laces.
    I used to have a cartoon on my wall, back in the '70s, in which two children were comparing their watches. One is saying to the other, "But where's the intellectual rigour in learning to tell time on a digital watch?"

    Grant Hutchison

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    111
    I have 2 watches, both Casio G-Shock solar charged self setting models. One is analog and one is digital, and I've had both for over 10 years. I just replaced the cell in the digital one because it was finally dying after 15-odd years. Not sure what I'll do with the analog one if/when its cell dies (I bought it a few years after the digital one), since I can't find any information on cell replacement for that one, and the back doesn't even look removable without special tools. I might just have to keep that one in sunlight more, or just toss it, if/when it starts to die.

    Now that I work from home I rarely wear them anymore, but I'll put them outside on the deck on a sunny day every so often to charge them up.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,882
    Kids' shoes definitely still come with velcro.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    6,134
    Right.

    In the mid-1970s, I got one of the earlier digital watches with the red LED. It was great for checking in low light, and held up well against brightness. I was rather proud of it for a few days. People would say "Cool! Light it up, I wanna see it!"

    However, early on the batt6ery failed. I had it replaced. It seemed that the new battery didn't last very long. I asked the guy at the jewelry shop who was replacing it once again about that.

    "If you light it up more than four or five times a day, it'll burn up. How often do you light it up?"

    "Uhhh … maybe three or four times in an hour. Hey, I'm a teacher, and you have to keep track of the time for your presentations."

    After that, I tried to cut down upon time-checking. Use any available, visible clock instead. Estimate the time elapsed since last check. Hmm, has that shadow gotten longer? Ah, well, no alternatives left. So bite the bullet and press the button for a quick look. Hmmm, maybe I should wear my old watch on the other wrist as a backup.



    It was all very silly. I was glad to get an LCD model when it became available.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2021-Mar-14 at 04:11 PM.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    417
    I wore a watch in my teens. From my early 20s I've gone without. I spent a lifetime in meetings and traveling on tight schedules and can't recall having needed one. Of course, today, I have a smartphone and check time, temperature, headlines and whatnot more than ever.
    Anyway, on digital vs analog. I live just outside of Ottawa, Canada and the Peace Tower, with a clock ŗ la Big Ben, is wonderfully visible from even the Gatineau Hills. A couple of decades ago it was shrouded for several years in scaffolding and I convinced a girlfriend and her young son that it was to be converted to a digital face. GF was angry after the boy was teased at school.

    I loved the velcro shoes when they first came out but I only got a few pairs over the years. And I agree with Delvo. Over time shoes stretch and the velcro adapts less well than laces. Really just a design issue.

    Noclevername, that higher-ups joke should not really be funny but I'm still chuckling. I'm sure to use it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •