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Thread: Is there a map of the nearest stars, say out to 50-100 ly?

  1. #1
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    Is there a map of the nearest stars, say out to 50-100 ly?

    I haven't been able to find one larger than the first few light years. I am curious about the "stages" of interstellar colonisation we would undertake as we moved gradually outward.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    I haven't been able to find one larger than the first few light years. I am curious about the "stages" of interstellar colonisation we would undertake as we moved gradually outward.
    The Atlas of the Universe site might give you what you need. Fun site too.

    http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/

  3. #3
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    There are lots of them. Some samples from just the first page of google hits
    https://in-the-sky.org/ngc3d.php
    https://stars.chromeexperiments.com/
    http://www.parvarium.com/stars/

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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    I haven't been able to find one larger than the first few light years. I am curious about the "stages" of interstellar colonisation we would undertake as we moved gradually outward.
    Coordinates of stars within 50 years with star classification, has a partial 2-D map too. Most star maps though are 3-D because 2-D maps are too hard to read.

    http://www.icc.dur.ac.uk/~tt/Lecture...ack/50lys.html

    As for colonization, it takes so much time and energy to reach other stars, I doubt anyone would be choosy. Any system with usable mass for habitats would be a target. The closer, the better.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    The Atlas of the Universe site might give you what you need. Fun site too.

    http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/
    From this it seems that there's a kind of "Yellow Brick Road" that allows quick star-hopping from Alpha Centauri to Groombridge 34 to Ross 248 to Barnard's Star to 61 Cygni. It's plausible they would be the first wave colonised, with the more distant stars probably saved for more efficient and safer space travel.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

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    It might be easier (in terms of specifically answering your questions) to find a copy of the old Hipparchos/Tycho catalogue (you can FTP a text version from Vizier, I believe) and do your own maps/visualisations. I was tinkering with this a few years ago, using the travelling salesperson approach (using one of Googles OR solvers in Python). You can also cluster a filtered version of them to find areas of high potential.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    From this it seems that there's a kind of "Yellow Brick Road" that allows quick star-hopping from Alpha Centauri to Groombridge 34 to Ross 248 to Barnard's Star to 61 Cygni. It's plausible they would be the first wave colonised, with the more distant stars probably saved for more efficient and safer space travel.
    I don't hold much hope for the 'star-hopping' model of colonisation. If the first colony mission arrived at Alpha Centauri, the first priority for the colonists would be to establish a stable habitat for themselves in that system, a process that could take many years of prospecting for resources and processing them to create life-support systems.

    In all likelihood the ship they arrived in would not be fit for departure to another star; it would have used all, or nearly all of its fuel and propellant, and probably shed many stages, fuel tanks and other unwanted mass. To get this ship back into working order, using only the small complement of colonists on-board, would probably take many years or decades. The colonists would not have the leisure to repair or rebuild their spaceship; they would be too busy trying to survive.

    In the meantime, the advanced industrial civilisation back at Earth and the Solar System could probably have build several more interstellar ships, and sent these off the the other nearby stars with comparative ease. I don't see secondary colonisation being particularly important until hundreds of years after the first wave.

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