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Thread: Sixty Years of People in Space

  1. #1
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    Sixty Years of People in Space

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  2. #2
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    Reading that article, I chuckled at this sentence (I assume either a translation issue or the author not understanding the concept):

    Had the brakes failed on his spacecraft, Gagarin would likely have remained in space for considerably longer and run out of supplies of food, drink and oxygen in the process.

    I’m picturing brakes on a spacecraft, and how utterly useless they would be in space . . . that should be “braking rockets” or “retrorockets” or similar.

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  3. #3
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    Well, it has been 60 years, but only a relative handful of people have actually been in space. I am hopeful we are about to get out of this far too long rut and move into a new space age when many people go to space, not just for limited government missions but commercially, at far lower cost, to work and to play, as we were promised would happen soon when I was a child.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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    Happy Yuri’s Night! I admit I won’t be able to celebrate as much as in the past because of quarantine, but my family and I will be celebrating at home. My Mom wants to try making a Russian rice and chicken recipe she found!
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Happy Yuri’s Night! I admit I won’t be able to celebrate as much as in the past because of quarantine, but my family and I will be celebrating at home. My Mom wants to try making a Russian rice and chicken recipe she found!
    I was going to celebrate by going into orbit myself, but my space programme is severely underfunded and way behind schedule.
    People who live in glass houses, should get undressed in the dark.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Well, it has been 60 years, but only a relative handful of people have actually been in space.
    That made me curious as to how many it has been. The wikipedia article is a little out of date:
    As of January 2018, people from 37 countries have traveled in space.[1] 553 people have reached Earth orbit. 556 have reached the altitude of space according to the FAI definition of the boundary of space, and 562 people have reached the altitude of space according to the American definition. 24 people have traveled beyond low Earth orbit and either circled, orbited, or walked on the Moon.
    There is this website for current count (currently 7).

    I thought this graph was particularly interesting (from this website). If you ignore the post-shuttle drop from about 2000 to 2010, there has been a pretty steady rise since the 1970s.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    That made me curious as to how many it has been. The wikipedia article is a little out of date:


    There is this website for current count (currently 7).

    I thought this graph was particularly interesting (from this website). If you ignore the post-shuttle drop from about 2000 to 2010, there has been a pretty steady rise since the 1970s.

    Which is a good reminder that it’s both Yuri’s Night and John and Bob’s Night.

    Quote Originally Posted by 21st Century Schizoid Man View Post
    I was going to celebrate by going into orbit myself, but my space programme is severely underfunded and way behind schedule.
    Well, I told you not to spend the budget on t-shirts...
    Last edited by KaiYeves; 2021-Apr-12 at 08:57 PM.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  8. #8
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    If you had asked me around 1980 how many people I would expect to be in space in 2020, I would have said, barring nuclear war, at least hundreds, and probably thousands, of people would be living for extended periods in space, and tens to hundreds of thousands would have had short flights to orbit. The assumption there was that the cost would come way down, and the Space Shuttle was to be the first step towards that. Instead, of course, the Shuttle merely continued extremely expensive and rare crewed launches for decades - the great rut we’ve long been stuck in.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    If you had asked me around 1980 how many people I would expect to be in space in 2020, I would have said, barring nuclear war, at least hundreds, and probably thousands, of people would be living for extended periods in space, and tens to hundreds of thousands would have had short flights to orbit. The assumption there was that the cost would come way down, and the Space Shuttle was to be the first step towards that. Instead, of course, the Shuttle merely continued extremely expensive and rare crewed launches for decades - the great rut we’ve long been stuck in.
    While not as dramatic a change as promised, I think in terms of American spaceflight the space shuttle really was quite a stark change, it made types of missions possible that would not have been possible before, launched seven people at a time instead of three, and was the first program where the space program actually “looked like America” instead of being only for WASPy men.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  10. #10
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    His spaceflight lasted 108 minutes as he circled the Earth for a little more than one full orbit. There were interesting studies on requirements of a ship that will take the first wave of deep-space human explorers to nearby Object like a near Earth asteroid (NEA) or Mars, space stations have given much information about long duration flight. Here are some tables on some of the spaceflight feats already achieved http://www.spacefacts.de/english/e_az.htm , http://www.spacefacts.de/english/list_flights.htm The Private sector is growing and Musk has regularly estimated that humans could establish a base / village / city on Mars as early as 2050....but not sure what he means by 'city', maybe a city with a few humans and lots and lots of robots?

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