Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 34 of 34

Thread: If we discovered a "cure" for psychopathy, should it be used?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,795
    Quote Originally Posted by Copernicus View Post
    There are billions of psychopaths around. They are called computers! They do exactly what they are programmed to do.
    Which has nothing to do with the topic of this thread.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,120
    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    I'm not just talking about criminals. I'm talking about CEOs, law enforcement, journalism and any other profession in which psychopaths are overrepresented. Any one of them has the potential to harm the world in a significant way.
    So putting aside that there's no clear definition of psychopath to measure that claim against... assuming you're right and positions of authority and power are overloaded with psychopaths, who then is going to impose a supposed cure on "everyone"? The people who would most need it would be the ones in charge of who gets it!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,522
    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    If we discovered a "cure" for psychopathy, should it be used?
    I think it would only be useful if it could be applied to everyone.
    I think some useful comparisons might be found by looking at schizophrenia. But keep in mind I am neither a physician (or mental health professional) nor an attorney.

    As I understand it, schizophrenia is a well recognized illness in the medical community and there are multiple treatments for schizophrenia (though I don't think there is anything close to a cure) with varying degrees of both effectiveness and side effects.

    I also understand that schizophrenia can, in some small percentage of cases, lead to violent behavior that can be harmful to either the patient or others. But even in those circumstances it can be difficult to force someone into treatment who does not wish it.

    For example, from this website:
    In some situations, your loved one may need to get treatment in a hospital even though they don't want to go. You may hear this called "involuntary hospitalization" or "involuntary commitment."

    "Laws governing involuntary commitment differ from state to state," Reiss says. Most states allow it only if someone with schizophrenia is in one of these situations:

    - An immediate danger to themselves or others
    - "Gravely impaired" and unable to function (for example, being unable to provide basic things for themselves, like food, clothing, and shelter)
    I can report from personal experience (which I will not elaborate on) that involuntary commitment, at least in the United States, is a non-trivial legal decision involving the patient, other interested parties (the family), the medical profession, and the judicial system, and it is decided on a case-by-case basis.

    I cannot imagine that anything different would ever be done for psychopathy, even if it was a well-defined disease with a specific cure; at least within our current moral framework and legal system.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,809
    In the US, it is almost impossible to get someone treatment they don't want. A substantial percentage of mentally ill people, though far from all of us, have a condition called "anosognosia," which is the inability to know that something is wrong with your brain. Someone suffering that, who chooses not to get treatment, pretty much won't.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •