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Thread: Gliese 710 Close Approach - Much Closer !

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    Gliese 710 Close Approach - Much Closer !

    According to this article, using Gaia EDR3 data, Gliese 710 will approach to just 0.02 parsecs in 1.32 million years.

    0.02 parsecs is 0.065 light-years, or 4,125 AU.

    This is much closer than the previous estimate of 14,000 AU and within the Oort cloud.

    Study of Close Stellar Encounters with the Solar System Based on Data from the Gaia EDR3 Catalogue

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2104.10487

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    I probably won't still be alive, but you never know!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I probably won't still be alive, but you never know!
    I always wanted to live to see the sun's planetary nebula. Now I read that the sun may be a little too small to have a decent planetary nebula. Well, I guess we will all know one way or another in about seven million millennia.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    According to this article, using Gaia EDR3 data, Gliese 710 will approach to just 0.02 parsecs in 1.32 million years.

    0.02 parsecs is 0.065 light-years, or 4,125 AU.

    This is much closer than the previous estimate of 14,000 AU and within the Oort cloud....
    Indeed, that is quite an improved estimate. Thirty-five years ago, the estimate was that Gliese 710 would come within a comfortable 3 lightyears in a million years from now. That's quite a bit different from 0.065 lightyears!
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

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    I look forward to the final data release.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    So that means it will get to be about magnitude -6 (quick estimate) ... so, much brighter than Venus at greatest brilliance. It will be difficult waiting to see this spectacle!
    Forming opinions as we speak

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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    So that means it will get to be about magnitude -6 (quick estimate) ... so, much brighter than Venus at greatest brilliance. It will be difficult waiting to see this spectacle!
    Wow. A -6 is right around the magnitude of the crescent moon (and would probably seem brighter, since it would not be an extended object). I can't wait!
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    I look forward to the final data release.
    Every time this calculation is revisited using new data, it gets closer. Be careful what you wish for !

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I probably won't still be alive, but you never know!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylYEaVsNQtY
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    Every time this calculation is revisited using new data, it gets closer. Be careful what you wish for !
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    And you'll be able to see its proper motion over the course of your lifetime.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    And you'll be able to see its proper motion over the course of your lifetime.
    Yes easily. At the current estimate, it will move about the width of a full Moon in seven years (at closest approach).
    Forming opinions as we speak

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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    Yes easily. At the current estimate, it will move about the width of a full Moon in seven years (at closest approach).
    As we know, 1.32 million years is but an eyeblink. If human civilisation started 1,319,500 years later than it actually did, what effect would the presence of this visibly moving and bright star have on the history of astronomy?

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    No "unchangeable heavens" for one thing. We would get parallax for Gliese 710 probably shortly after we get telescopes (from the waviness of the proper motion) and that will make it obvious that the star is little dimmer than the Sun, so we will know stars are suns presumably with planets early on for another.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    According to this article, using Gaia EDR3 data, Gliese 710 will approach to just 0.02 parsecs in 1.32 million years.

    0.02 parsecs is 0.065 light-years, or 4,125 AU.

    This is much closer than the previous estimate of 14,000 AU and within the Oort cloud.

    Study of Close Stellar Encounters with the Solar System Based on Data from the Gaia EDR3 Catalogue

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2104.10487
    If Gliese 710 passes through our Oort cloud then can we assume that our Sun and it's planets will also pass through it's Oort cloud?

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    Presumably, yes.
    I would imagine Gliese 710's Oort cloud to be somewhat smaller than Sol's (it's a smaller star) but not greatly so (it's not exactly a brown dwarf).
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Gliese 710 (can it be shortened to G710, or would that be Gould?) is now in Serpent. Which is borne by Ophiuchus, a zodiac sign, and thus itself near zodiac.
    In which direction will Gliese 710 be during its nearest approach? Note that stars members of constellations will have moved a lot, but the basic plane of zodiac will not move much.

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    That might increase the chance that the Hills Cloud of the inner Oort will be affected by the passage (it's more disk shaped than spherical).
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Presumably, yes.
    I would imagine Gliese 710's Oort cloud to be somewhat smaller than Sol's (it's a smaller star) but not greatly so (it's not exactly a brown dwarf).
    My dated info says it's about half the Sun's mass.....
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

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    Planet 9 if it exists would have an orbit 400-800 AU (major axis of ellipse) at an inclination of 15-25 degrees.

    Gliese 710 approaches to about 4,000 AU, i.e Planet 9 is 10-20% of the way there if it is in the same plane. Its mass is 0.65 the mass of the sun.

    I don't know what angle Gliese 710 will make with Planet 9 orbit, but the potential is surely there to affect the orbit of this planet, should it actually exist?
    Last edited by kzb; 2021-Apr-27 at 08:00 PM.

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    Somewhat. Jupiter affects almost everything in the Solar System and it is a fraction of a percent Gliese 710's mass.
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Based on the discussion in https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthr...light=passages this is something like a once in an eon event!
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Based on the discussion in https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthr...light=passages this is something like a once in an eon event!
    If the equation

    N = 3.5 * D^2.12 /Myr (where D is in parsecs)

    is applicable in this case, 0.02pc encounters should happen on average every 1.14 billion years.

    That being the case, probably this encounter is the closest to be expected during the whole time that multicellular life can exist on Earth.

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    The average lifespan of a mammalian species is something like a couple million years iirc.
    Homo sapiens is something like a few thousand centuries old.
    What a coincidence that we get this flyby in the narrow window when our species may be in a position to enjoy it (and maybe reach it, going from one object in our/its Oort Clouds to another).
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    Planet 9 if it exists would have an orbit 400-800 AU (major axis of ellipse) at an inclination of 15-25 degrees.

    Gliese 710 approaches to about 4,000 AU, i.e Planet 9 is 10-20% of the way there if it is in the same plane. Its mass is 0.65 the mass of the sun.

    I don't know what angle Gliese 710 will make with Planet 9 orbit, but the potential is surely there to affect the orbit of this planet, should it actually exist?
    it was said the outer planets did not follow a expected orbit because an other mass was effecting them
    that was the listed explanation for the search for Neptune and pluto at the time they were found

    was that a flawed mr N based math idea or does mr E's relative revisions also produce an extra mass out there needed to explain there orbits

    and would the passing of a star be a good solution to the orbits problem without extra planets needed ?
    or is the only solution an other planet ?
    Last edited by nota; 2021-Apr-30 at 05:26 PM.

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