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Thread: Anti-gravity areas

  1. #1
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    Anti-gravity areas

    How can these phenomenons can possibly be explained by mainstream science?
    https://www.labroots.com/trending/ea...ravity-doesn-t

    (I'm not trying to debate, I just want to know possible mainstream explanations)

  2. #2
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    ??? Four of the five have mundane explanations already in the text on the web site. And iím not eager to invite more clickbait by viewing the fifth. So the site presents mainstream answers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    ??? Four of the five have mundane explanations already in the text on the web site. And i’m not eager to invite more clickbait by viewing the fifth. So the site presents mainstream answers.
    You mean solely the wind?

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    Quote Originally Posted by philippeb8 View Post
    You mean solely the wind?
    So according to Wikipedia and some psychological science (not physics) paper, this is an illusion:
    https://zenodo.org/record/1006741

    So nobody ever used a level meter to confirm I guess.

  5. #5
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    Some are wind, others are due to perspective, where you don't see the real horizon on a hill and it looks like you're on an uphill slope but it's really downhill.

    There's places in the video where perspective is skewed as well (tilted walls, floors, ceilings in a building).

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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Some are wind, others are due to perspective, where you don't see the real horizon on a hill and it looks like you're on an uphill slope but it's really downhill.

    There's places in the video where perspective is skewed as well (tilted walls, floors, ceilings in a building).
    Ok thanks. So I'll take that as the mainstream answer.

  7. #7
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    There's a road in Scotland called the Electric Brae, where a road that appears to slope uphill actually slopes downhill. People stop their cars on the hill, release the handbrake, and then get excited when the car rolls in the opposite direction to the one they expect, visually. It's an optical illusion caused by the fact that the local terrain and nearby horizon tilt downhill at a steeper angle than the road does.
    It's not only very dull, it's not even a good optical illusion. The one time I visited, I was struck by how strong my impression was that the road sloped downhill from where I stood. Turned out it did slope downhill from where I stood. I was able to piece together why people might think it sloped the other way, but despite my best efforts I couldn't induce the perceptual flip into the illusion.

    You can watch a person being overly impressed by the Electric Brae on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvJybXg1EeQ
    (You may find that the illusion works even less well on video than it does in real life.)

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There's a road in Scotland called the Electric Brae, where a road that appears to slope uphill actually slopes downhill. People stop their cars on the hill, release the handbrake, and then get excited when the car rolls in the opposite direction to the one they expect, visually. It's an optical illusion caused by the fact that the local terrain and nearby horizon tilt downhill at a steeper angle than the road does.
    It's not only very dull, it's not even a good optical illusion. The one time I visited, I was struck by how strong my impression was that the road sloped downhill from where I stood. Turned out it did slope downhill from where I stood. I was able to piece together why people might think it sloped the other way, but despite my best efforts I couldn't induce the perceptual flip into the illusion.

    You can watch a person being overly impressed by the Electric Brae on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvJybXg1EeQ
    (You may find that the illusion works even less well on video than it does in real life.)

    Grant Hutchison
    There's a small stretch of the Mountain Parkway near where I live in KY that also has this effect, oddly though you only get the illusion when driving on the west bound side of the highway.

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    I was thinking, “Sounds like the California Mystery Spot” and it turns out that was #2 on the list. I found it underwhelming - basically a guy built a “house” with well known optical illusions in mind, and the guides make up stories about it (like a strange meteorite claimed to be buried there). If you know a bit about optical illusions it all is rather obvious. But it has been around a long time and became a minor tourist attraction. I give it points for longevity at least.
    Last edited by Van Rijn; 2021-May-14 at 09:22 PM. Reason: Typo

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronin View Post
    There's a small stretch of the Mountain Parkway near where I live in KY that also has this effect, oddly though you only get the illusion when driving on the west bound side of the highway.
    Some links. Thatís a gravity hill:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_hill

    Mystery spot:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mystery_Spot

    Oregon vortex (another optical illusion based attraction - there are a number of them):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Vortex

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    ??? Four of the five have mundane explanations already in the text on the web site. And i’m not eager to invite more clickbait by viewing the fifth. So the site presents mainstream answers.
    The fifth was the Hoover dam. Wind can get redirected and focused upward by the huge dam, and water from a water bottle or similar can be pushed up.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  12. #12
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    Ok thanks I appreciate!


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