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Thread: When would this phrase be understood?

  1. #1
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    When would this phrase be understood?

    This is a question dealing with understanding when as in decade, year or era, the following phrase would make sense (in the English speaking world).

    If I said this phrase to people knowledgeable in astronomy and other notable scientists in what period of time would it be understood?

    "extra-solar dynamic spatial strain?"

    I'm trying to understand when these theories or ideas became understood or known.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    That phrase doesn't exist in a full text search of the 15 million publications in astronomy and astrophysics indexed by the NASA Astrophysics Data System. So it seems not to be something astronomers and astrophysicists actually write.
    Where did you get it from?

    Grant Hutchison

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    Well “dynamic spacial strain” is not a common phrase although three dimensional strain ( and stress) has meaning in for example contact stresses and strains. The extrasolar part just means outside our system. Most strain is actually in 3D, so spacial. But I suspect this phrase has not been coined while distortions in space time have been. I think you need to explain the context more, is it a crossword clue for warp drives?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Honestly, it sounds like the kind of gobbledygook you'd hear on a Star Trek episode. Is it perhaps a phrase translated from another language?

    An exact word search on google turns up nothing,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans View Post
    This is a question dealing with understanding when as in decade, year or era, the following phrase would make sense (in the English speaking world).

    If I said this phrase to people knowledgeable in astronomy and other notable scientists in what period of time would it be understood?

    "extra-solar dynamic spatial strain?"

    I'm trying to understand when these theories or ideas became understood or known.

    Thanks
    Extra-solar would be understood probably from about the mid 1700s (although you might have to qualify it by explaining that solar in this case meant solar system)
    Dynamic would probably make sense from pretty early on.
    Spatial strain would be tougher. I've only actually seen it pop up in discussions about gravitational waves and is language that has only appeared generally in the last two decades that I can see. To have them be able to guess what you might mean by it I'd expect people to have to understand the concept of spacetime (so post 1905), have a grounding in the stress-energy-momentum tensor (so post 1915), believe that gravitational waves were possible (so around 1960, but more likely in the 1970s) and of course know Hooke's work on elastic materials (1680).

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the response from you all much appreciated: Some more context:

    I write Historical fiction set in the India of the 1840's (been doing so for ten+ years) I have lots of notes and I came across this comment within my notes. I noted it down but did not note where I got it from - unfortunately. It was mixed in with comments taken from 19th century books but it seems to be an outlier.

    Other notes from the same page of notes:

    Adventuresses from Milliners shops on Ludgate Hill and some even from Covent Garden and Old Drury [well known areas of prostitution in late 18th century London].

    The British Mercenary gave out the Masonic sign of distress, which was recognized by one of our mercenary officers who intervened on his behalf and ordered the officer not to be harmed, though he was taken prisoner.

    Barm - Liverpool, Barmcake - Lancashire, Manchester, Roll - South of England, Scotland, Cob - Birmingham, Breadcake - Yorkshire, Bread Roll - South of England, Bread Bun- North Yorkshire, North East, Bap - South Yorkshire, Shropshire

    Brunel's machines for making ship blocks using metal machines to make wooden blocks so that ten men do the work of one hundred and ten

    Measuring the distance to a star using parallax was F.W. Bessel, who in 1838 measured the parallax angle of 61 Cygni as 0.28 arcseconds, which gives a distance of 3.57 pc

    Then the comment above, nothing followed it.

    It just puzzles me as it doesn't seem to fit the era.

  7. #7
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    What an interesting collection of snippets.! It is the word spacial that stands out for me in place of triaxial (strain) .
    It fits with parallax measurement I suppose but would be too early, I would have thought, for distortions of space in a Newtonian era.
    (Except for Bessel functions, which are 3d and complicated integrals taught to me in the context of boundary layer thermodynamics)
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    What an interesting collection of snippets.! It is the word spacial that stands out for me in place of triaxial (strain) .
    It fits with parallax measurement I suppose but would be too early, I would have thought, for distortions of space in a Newtonian era.
    (Except for Bessel functions, which are 3d and complicated integrals taught to me in the context of boundary layer thermodynamics)
    Thanks for the response! What date would you put on that statement?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans View Post
    Thanks for the response! What date would you put on that statement?
    Well I would arbitrarily say 1846 the year Neptune was discovered partly throughBessel’s work and by which time his parallax method was publicised. But I have no justification to be so precise, late half of 19th century could see those kind of discussions. Bessel is not really well known but he must have been very clever and capable of the kind of advanced concept hinted at by your phrase.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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