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Thread: Atlas V: Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2)

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    2,458
    MEDIA ADVISORY M21-132

    NASA, Boeing to Provide Update on Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test-2

    NASA and Boeing will hold a joint teleconference at 2:30 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 19, to update media on the company’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft. Teams will discuss work on the oxidizer isolation valve issue that was discovered ahead of the planned uncrewed Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2) mission to the International Space Station in August.

    Participants in the briefing will be:

    Steve Stich, manager of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program

    John Vollmer, vice president and program manager, Boeing Commercial Crew Program

    Michelle Parker, chief engineer, Boeing Space and Launch

    Audio of the teleconference will stream live online at:

    https://www.nasa.gov/live

    To participate in the teleconference, media must contact ksc-newsroom@mail.nasa.gov by 1:30 p.m. Oct. 19 for the dial-in information.

    The OFT-2 mission will launch Starliner on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Starliner will dock to the space station before returning to land in the western United States about a week later as part of an end-to-end test flight to prove the system is ready to fly crew.

    Learn more about NASA’s Commercial Crew Program at:

    https://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

    -end-

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    20,697
    So the news conference mentioned in the prior post has happened and here is an article on what was discussed:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021...-half-of-2022/

    Boeing's chief engineer for space and launch, Michelle Parker, said during a news conference with reporters Tuesday that the company has a pretty solid hypothesis for what went wrong. At some point during the 46-day period when the vehicle was fueled—and when the valves were found to be stuck—humidity must have gotten into the spacecraft. This moisture combined with the oxidizer and created nitric acid, beginning the process of corrosion.

    Parker said dew points at the launch site were high in August, and while the vehicle was designed to operate in Florida's humidity, there is physical evidence that humidity is nonetheless the culprit. Boeing and NASA engineers now want to try to recreate the corrosive reaction in similar test conditions so that they can be confident of the root cause and any countermeasures they implement.


    Pretty much what was suspected previously. I’ll be curious as to how it got in if they took pains to limit it.

    They are targeting a test launch next year, probably no earlier than May so crew flights wont happen until late 2022 or more likely sometime in 2023.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  3. #63
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    Feb 2011
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    So, only now are they considering the use of vent dessicants and heaters to mitigate moisture? In Florida??

    /sigh...

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    20,697
    Yeah, I’m really curious what mitigation (if any) they had to start with. I would think it would be an obvious issue, and that they would have done something.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

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