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Thread: La Palma eruption

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    I have seen programs dealing with the possible mega tsunami from a large chuck of the island dropping into the Atlantic.

  3. #3
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    I saw a YouTube video yesterday, it was mixed in with all the alarmist videos. If I can find it again, I'll post a link. But the scientist claims that when La Palma collapses, the tsunami that reaches the east coast will only be a meter or so high. So, if he's correct, it's not the end of the world. Go on to the beach and enjoy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    I saw a YouTube video yesterday, it was mixed in with all the alarmist videos. If I can find it again, I'll post a link. But the scientist claims that when La Palma collapses, the tsunami that reaches the east coast will only be a meter or so high. So, if he's correct, it's not the end of the world. Go on to the beach and enjoy.
    The question is of course which depiction is correct?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    The question is of course which depiction is correct?
    The plausible and properly skeptical depiction is more likely correct, based on actual science. But even a one meter tsunami is something to stay out of the water for. The rip currents and undertow would not be safe, and some lower lying areas, one meter is a significant elevation change.

    CJSF
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  6. #6
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    Also, it's been interesting to read on Twitter how this eruption is actually affecting telescope time of the other side of the island due to ashfall. Meg Scwamb (who has worked with Dr. Mike Brown) and Dr. Becky Smethurst (who researches super-massive black holes) have both lost telescope time from this.

    CJSF
    "I like the stories
    About angels, unicorns and elves
    Now I like those stories
    As much as anybody else
    But when I'm seeking knowledge
    Either simple or abstract
    The facts are with science"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Science Is Real"


    lonelybirder.org

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    The plausible and properly skeptical depiction is more likely correct, based on actual science. But even a one meter tsunami is something to stay out of the water for. The rip currents and undertow would not be safe, and some lower lying areas, one meter is a significant elevation change.

    CJSF
    IF approximately 1/3 to 1/2 of the slides into the Atlantic as the program I watched there would be a much greater than one meter wave generated. I'm not predicting, I'm just putting the occurrence in perspective. You may be correct that skeptical depiction may be warranted as catastrophic natural occurrences are a rarity.

    It is too bad that the telescope is down during this eruption and I hope that the eruption ceases soon, but this eruption may be a relief valve against a more major calamity.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Also, it's been interesting to read on Twitter how this eruption is actually affecting telescope time of the other side of the island due to ashfall. Meg Scwamb (who has worked with Dr. Mike Brown) and Dr. Becky Smethurst (who researches super-massive black holes) have both lost telescope time from this.
    CJSF
    Our consortium remotely operates the 1-meter Kapteyn telescope at that site. A local colleague from the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias reminded us that the last eruption (farther south) on La Palma, in 1971, went on for three months, so we should be mentally prepared for maybe months of downtime now. We asked to have local staff members wrap the telescope in tarps to be ready when we do open and some residual ash is almost guaranteed to get inside; might act like tiny bits of ground glass, might have interacted with rain by then to make chunks of volcanic concrete...

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