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Thread: New Apollo Quiz Game

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter B
    If I may therefore revise my question,

    "Who was the last Apollo surface Capcom to get into space?"

    Or have I forfeited my rights? (Uh-oh.)
    Given the revised question, I'll say Tony England, who was the EVA Capcom for A-16.

  2. #32
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    According to my information, that's correct.

    For those interested, I got the names of the Capcoms from the ALSJ, which included brief biographies. Some Capcoms got into space later in Apollo, or in Skylab. But some had to wait for the Shuttle.

    Fullerton went on STS-3 in 1982;
    Allen went on STS-5 in 1982;
    Parker went on STS-9 in 1983;
    McCandless went on STS-41B in 1984;

    And England went on STS-51B in 1985.

    Your turn again, Mr AGN Fuel.

    Looks like the Aussies are dominating things (just like the cricket, the swimming and the rugby league).

  3. #33
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    All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

    Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

    And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

    Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

    And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).
    OK - given that question has attracted such a flood of interest....

    New question:

    Although this is not strictly an Apollo question, who was the first person to fly in space twice?

  5. #35
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    WAG - Gus Grissom?

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

    Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

    And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).
    OK - given that question has attracted such a flood of interest....

    New question:

    Although this is not strictly an Apollo question, who was the first person to fly in space twice?
    Joseph A Walker

    He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valiant Dancer
    Joseph A Walker

    He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)
    Valiant Dancer picks the trick. Take it away, my friend!



    (BTW for anyone interested: the answers to the earlier questions were Apollo 16 conducted the most geology field trips during training with 18 [the runner up being Apollo 17 with 13].

    The fewest crew/ground integrated sims was for Apollo 8 with only 14 - unsurprising given the relatively short training period for the revised mission and no LM sims required. Apollo 7 had the second fewest with 18 - again, no LM sims required. The record for the most was Apollo 16 with 33.)

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by Valiant Dancer
    Joseph A Walker

    He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)
    Valiant Dancer picks the trick. Take it away, my friend!



    (BTW for anyone interested: the answers to the earlier questions were Apollo 16 conducted the most geology field trips during training with 18 [the runner up being Apollo 17 with 13].

    The fewest crew/ground integrated sims was for Apollo 8 with only 14 - unsurprising given the relatively short training period for the revised mission and no LM sims required. Apollo 7 had the second fewest with 18 - again, no LM sims required. The record for the most was Apollo 16 with 33.)
    OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valiant Dancer
    OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.
    Svetlana Savitskaya, who launched on Soyuz T-7 (8/19/82) & T-12 (7/17/84). Both missions were to Salyut 7.
    The historical record of Apollo is overwhelming - greater than anything you can glean from questions on a bulletin board. That America abandoned Apollo (and the spirit it engendered) is a travesty. To persistently maintain that it never happened in the first place is nothing short of despicable.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Count Zero
    Quote Originally Posted by Valiant Dancer
    OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.
    Svetlana Savitskaya.
    Correct. She flew on 19 August, 1982 and again on 17 July, 1984 beating Sally Ride to the mark by almost 3 months. She also performed the first EVA by a woman.

    Your turn to pose the question.

  11. #41
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    Still off of the Apollo subject:

    How many women have flown on Soyuz?
    The historical record of Apollo is overwhelming - greater than anything you can glean from questions on a bulletin board. That America abandoned Apollo (and the spirit it engendered) is a travesty. To persistently maintain that it never happened in the first place is nothing short of despicable.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Count Zero
    Still off of the Apollo subject:

    How many women have flown on Soyuz?
    I'll say 4:

    Svetlana Savitskaya on T-7 and T-12
    Helen Sharman on TM-12
    Elena Kondakova on TM-20
    Claudie Haignere on TM-33


    (I'm sure I've missed someone...)

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    I'll say 4:

    Svetlana Savitskaya on T-7 and T-12
    Helen Sharman on TM-12
    Elena Kondakova on TM-20
    Claudie Haignere on TM-33

    (I'm sure I've missed someone...)
    Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

    Anyway, the next question is yours, AGN.
    The historical record of Apollo is overwhelming - greater than anything you can glean from questions on a bulletin board. That America abandoned Apollo (and the spirit it engendered) is a travesty. To persistently maintain that it never happened in the first place is nothing short of despicable.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Count Zero
    Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?



    OK, back to Apollo...

    Which mission's crew were the first to use a planet rather than a star to make an inertial measurement unit alignment? What was the planet?

    (This is not a trick question, so I am not including the Earth!)

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by Count Zero
    Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?



    OK, back to Apollo...

    Which mission's crew were the first to use a planet rather than a star to make an inertial measurement unit alignment? What was the planet?

    (This is not a trick question, so I am not including the Earth!)
    Apollo 9 used Jupiter.

    Next question.

    Combines real space travel and pseudoscience.

    During Apollo 14, which astronaut conducted an unauthorized pseudoscientific experiment and how did he fare?

  16. #46
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    The answer to your question is Ed Mitchell, and the results were "inconclusive" since they got the times mixed up IIRC. Without confirmation of your victory however, I am of the opinion that your question is premature and therefore I will refrain until I hear from both parties (Valiant Dancer and AGN Fuel) before I proceed.

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waarthog
    The answer to your question is Ed Mitchell, and the results were "inconclusive" since they got the times mixed up IIRC. Without confirmation of your victory however, I am of the opinion that your question is premature and therefore I will refrain until I hear from both parties (Valiant Dancer and AGN Fuel) before I proceed.
    You are correct. So, pending verification by AGN Fuel, you're up. But I'd call inconclusive being generous.

  18. #48
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    Sorry folks, very busy weekend.

    Valiant Dancer was quite correct, so Waarthog, fire away.

  19. #49
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    But I'd call inconclusive being generous.

    Hence, it was in quotes.


    After Gemini ended, and before being called back for Apollo 7, where did Pad Leader Guenter Wendt work? (Generic answer will suffice)

  20. #50
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    Has no one read The Unbroken Chain by the aforementioned Guenter Wendt?

  21. #51
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    Ah, here:

    He worked instead on test firing anti-tank missiles for McDonnell, while continuing to keep up with the Apollo engineering reports.
    Or is it considered cheating in this quiz (my first post) to Google yourself towards the solution? 8-[

  22. #52
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    Quite right. Fire when ready.

  23. #53
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    Sorry, late at work - my question is not terribly serious, but then I am not terribly knowledgeable in Apollo affairs.

    Which item left on the Moon involves two ties?

  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arneb
    Sorry, late at work - my question is not terribly serious, but then I am not terribly knowledgeable in Apollo affairs.

    Which item left on the Moon involves two ties?
    From memory, the picture of his family left by Charlie Duke at the Descarte Highlands showed both Charlie and his son wearing ties.


    (Edited: Found it. A Hi-Res image can be seen at the Project Apollo Archive site - AS16-117-18841)

  25. #55
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    =D> =D> =D>

    I knew it wouldn't take long. I asked a similar question over at the ultimate astronomy quiz, and that took about six times as long and needed severel hints - But this is the world centre of Apollonics.

    Over to you, AGN Fuel.

  26. #56
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    Alrighty - fingers on buzzers, because this one will go fast.... in fact, we'll make it a 3-parter to make it just a little bit more challenging:

    1. One mission had a significantly longer S-II burn than any other. Which mission?

    2. Why was the burn longer?

    3. What was the duration of the burn in seconds and by how much did it beat 'second place'?

  27. #57
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    I can answer the first two, but that third one is just plain evil!
    The historical record of Apollo is overwhelming - greater than anything you can glean from questions on a bulletin board. That America abandoned Apollo (and the spirit it engendered) is a travesty. To persistently maintain that it never happened in the first place is nothing short of despicable.

  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGN Fuel
    1. One mission had a significantly longer S-II burn than any other. Which mission?

    2. Why was the burn longer?

    3. What was the duration of the burn in seconds and by how much did it beat 'second place'?
    1. Apollo 13.
    2. The center engine cut off was premature.
    3. 426.64 seconds, beating Apollo 17 by 31.58 seconds.

    See here for source

  29. #59
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    Doggone it. I've been saving up a good question, but I can never seem to get an answer (and thereby the right to ask it). I knew the "two ties" one, too! #-o

  30. #60
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    Correct, Bob B! You're up.

    (Hang in there Donnie B! :wink: )

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