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Thread: Crater chain on Ganymede

  1. #1
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    Crater chain on Ganymede

    Putting aside the issue of where this comes from, isn't this a wierd picture? It's a chain of craters on Ganymede. It almost seems like somebody took a big stone and rolled it along the surface.

    http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/20...0810crater.htm
    As above, so below

  2. #2
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    Have we ruled out the possibility that residents on Ganymede constructed that as an homage to the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy right before it hit Jupiter?
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  3. #3
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    Have we ruled out the possibility that residents on Ganymede constructed that as an homage to the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy right before it hit Jupiter?
    When crop circles go wrong.

    MG

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Pacis
    Have we ruled out the possibility that residents on Ganymede constructed that as an homage to the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy right before it hit Jupiter?
    Clearly, large stones were being rolled into place to build a Ziggurat which then took off for interstellar travel. Look carefully at the left end of the trail. You can see the faint large circle created during liftoff.

  5. #5
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    We had a poster here a couple of years ago who was seriously suggesting that this was evidence of an interplantary war. Look up "craterchains" in the archive for a generous plateful of prime woo. His debating style was less than skilled (variations of "Is too! IS TOO!) and he eventually outstayed his welcome and was banned.

  6. #6
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    Obviously a fossilized giant segmented worm.

  7. #7
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    No--I was just practicing my really fast way to blow a Panama Canal replacement through Central America. MUHAHAHA!

    ..crickets...

  8. #8
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    My first guess is that it is a comet impact, from a comet that had reached perijove shortly before impact and just inside Jupter's roche limit. I assume that Gannemede is not inside the Roche Limit (I'm sure plenty of babblers will be happy to correct me if I am wrong) , but it was that close when it started to break up.

  9. #9
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    ok I am delving into the insanity of craterchain's posts on the other thread.

    Here is my question. He contends that this had to happen instantly due to ejecta patterns. Now I can see how we could tell that the craters weren't formed weeks apart, but could it be conceivable that all the impacts happened inside a single tick of the clock, therefore adding a new impact before the ejecta from the last impact settled?

    The crater chains are really cool looking but I see nothing unatural about it. Especially nothing that would indicate a massice battle took place.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by skrap1r0n
    ok I am delving into the insanity of craterchain's posts on the other thread.

    Here is my question. He contends that this had to happen instantly due to ejecta patterns. Now I can see how we could tell that the craters weren't formed weeks apart, but could it be conceivable that all the impacts happened inside a single tick of the clock, therefore adding a new impact before the ejecta from the last impact settled?

    The crater chains are really cool looking but I see nothing unatural about it. Especially nothing that would indicate a massice battle took place.
    The consensus is that the chains are caused by tidal disruption of loosely-bound bodies, similar to what happened to Shoemaker-Levy. As for craterchains' "war" story - in the words of my grandma, "too daft to laugh at".

  11. #11
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    wow, just wow, that is such a fun thread.

  12. #12
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    Ignoring the loony tunes, this IS a very interesting picture, for the succesion of impacts and events it portrays. The line of craters overlies a straight rille that seperates two terrains, one heavily cratered and one not, so the uncratered is probabaly newer. The newer terrain above shows clearly different ejecta to the old from the straight line, so probably the equivalent of a maria, a magma outflow. It also bears small secondary cratering from the ejecta of a MUCH larger event to the bottom left. The older terrain below shows secondary faulting so probably much harder, deeper basement rock, and 'generations' of cratering under the straight line, indicating great age.

    All this points to the origin and history of Ganymede.

    Why do these guys see weird events, when it is much easier to interpret the true and much more interesting ones?

    John

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianok
    Obviously a fossilized giant segmented worm.
    Nononono...it's obviously tiny bubbles forming in the still-soft surface of our sister pancake-world. :^o

  14. #14
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    Of course all of this discussion is based on the assumption that the picture is legit. Are there any pictures of this from a non-woo-woo site?

  15. #15
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    jfribrg wrote:

    “Of course all of this discussion is based on the assumption that the picture is legit. Are there any pictures of this from a non-woo-woo site?”

    http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01610

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap011215.html

    I guess that is what irritates me most about crackpots…..they have soiled a fascinating subject. The first time I saw this image I was attempting to understand how much could be reasonably inferred by what was captured in the image. For example:

    The ‘upper’ half of the chain is emplaced on smoother and therefore much younger terrain than the lower half of the chain. Almost certainly due to localized heating of that region. This should result in localized differentientation. (the heavier materials sink to a greater depth than the older, lower region, leaving the upper region ‘ice rich’) This led me to infer that the reason the upper half shows lighter ejecta blankets than the lower half is entirely attributable to a different ratio of silicates to ‘ices’. (between the upper an lower regions)

  16. #16
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    I just noticed that JohnD already said basically the same thing. I really should read all of the posts more carefully.

  17. #17
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    No probs, Heathen! I learnt from your post.
    In my ignorance, I assumed that this was entirely rock, like the Moon. But now you mention it, ejecta from even young Moon craters doesn't show the type of spill that has come from the younger terrain here.

    John

  18. #18
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    What shame - cuts right across that road too.

    Nick :wink:

  19. #19
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    I had just finished paving it too.

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