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Thread: Space Telescope: The Next Generation (James Webb)

  1. #121
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    I was at a JWST status review yesterday. The mission is still a go, though launch has been pushed back to the spring of 2013. Most of the mirror segment blanks have been produced, and the polishing facility is nearing completion. One mirror segment had a hole punched in it due to a programming problem with the tooling machine, but there are spares available.

    There's a lot of replanning going on right now to reflect the new launch date, and there's some descoping of capabilities based on the report of an independent science review team. Most notably, JWST's capabilities in the optical range will not be as powerful as originallly planned, primarily because ground scopes are expected to be able to match it in within the JWST operational timeframe. (The science team was comparing it with a 30-meter ground-based optical scope, something that's only on the drawing boards right now but seems likely to happen considering that's the astronomical community's #2 priority, right after JWST.)
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  2. #122
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    Space telescope mockup at Goddard

    The front lawn at Goddard is currently home to a full-scale mockup of the James Webb Space Telescope. You can get a peek at it from Greenbelt Road out in front of Goddard. If anyone would like a closer look and can get to Goddard on Saturday around lunchtime, let me know via PM. They're having an open house that day, and I can escort people in to have a look.

    If you just want to see what it looks like, a colleague of mine has a bunch of photos online at:

    http://www.pfarrout.com/JWSTWeb/index.html

    You can see me in photo CRW_6607 almost dead center in front of the scope, shading my eyes from the Sun.

    (If you're wondering about the guy in the bucket truck, he was taking a photo of all the Goddard folks supporting JWST in front of the mockup.)
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek
    I was at a status report yesterday. They've created the blanks for most of the mirrors.
    Not only that, more than half of them have had some of the machining done to leave the thin face and supporting ribs structure. Ahh, maybe that's what qualifies a beryllium slab as a mirror blank... (previous eyewitness report)

  4. #124
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    Another thread on the JWST
    http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=18286

    Here's one that is doing very well
    NASA's Spitzer Telescope
    http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=17731

    ESA's Herschel observatory is scheduled for launch in the second half of 2007
    http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMV128X9DE_index_0.html
    http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/obj...objectid=34682
    The Herschel Space Observatory will be the largest ever infrared space observatory when it is launched in 2007.

    XEUS is a follow-on to ESA's Cornerstone X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission (XMM-NEWTON). It will be a permanent space-borne X-ray observatory with a sensitivity comparable to the most advanced planned future facilities
    http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/obj...objectid=31591
    http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMDJ12A6BD_index_0.html

    also watch out for NASA's TPF and ESA's Corot working on the search for extra solar worlds

  5. #125
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    the JWST looks like a great mission

  6. #126
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    Although not a direct successor to Hubble — JWST will observe mainly in the infrared
    http://www.nature.com/news/2005/0509...l/437610a.html
    Ottawa's EMS Wins key contract for NASA's Giant Space Telescope
    http://www.halifaxlive.com/artman/pu...905_1289.shtml
    NASA plans to reduce the sensitivity of the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope to beat back rising costs that threaten to overwhelm the project.
    http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/conten...309/5740/1472a
    Founded in 1981, the Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by AURA — the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy — under contract to NASA. STScI is housed in the Steven Muller Building, named after the university's 10th president, who was instrumental in bringing the institute to Maryland and the Homewood campus.
    Currently, the institute is home to planning, scheduling and public outreach activities for the Hubble Space Telescope. Data archive and distribution services for Hubble and other missions are also provided by STScI.
    In the future, the institute will operate and manage the James Webb Space Telescope, a large infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in August 2011. The Webb Telescope is designed to study the earliest galaxies and some of the first stars formed after the Big Bang — objects that have a high redshift from Earth's vantage point and need to be seen in infrared. The telescope will reside in a halo or second Lagrange point orbit, about one million miles from the Earth.
    http://www.jhu.edu/~gazette/2005/06sep05/06mount.html

  7. #127
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    Launch has been postponed to the spring of 2013 (also from the status meeting last week).
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  8. #128
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    I take it then that there is no optical replacement in the works?

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manchurian Taikonaut
    they're more or less sci-fi and I think they'll be never built, I know my Europe!!!

    This one is under construction, though

    The Giant Magellan Telescope

    http://www.gmto.org/

    live long and prosper
    Mauro

  10. #130
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    Mirror Segment for James Webb Space Telescope Delivered for Polishing

    Manufacturing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) progressed further with the delivery of the telescope's first mirror segment for grinding and polishing in late September. Northrop Grumman Corporation is NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's prime contractor for the space observatory, leading the design and development effort.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by frogesque
    If only we could launch that into space!
    Here's a bit more on that Euro-50 telescope
    50m, f/0.85

    http://www.npl.co.uk/length/dmet/euro50.html
    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/np...ML&format=
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4426535.stm

    report on Pdf
    The 50 m scope would collect 25 times more light than the largest telescope existing & using AdaptiveOptics would concentrate the light on a spot with an area some 2000 times smaller than that of a 10 m telescope without adaptive optics, Euro-50 is able to detect very faint objects down to a magnitude of 35 (at 2.4 microns wavelength).
    http://www.astro.lu.se/~torben/euro5...eport_V_26.pdf
    Euro50 will be built in La Palma, Spain

  12. #132
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    NASA Delays JWST Launch by 2 Years To Stem Cost Growth

    NASA plans to delay the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) nearly two years, to 2013, to cope with $1 billion in cost growth on the mission, a senior program official said.

    Paul Geithner, JWST program executive at NASA Headquarters here, said the agency elected in September to cover the additional costs rather than scale back the mission’s science objectives. The delay, he said, will soften the cost spike’s impact on the lean budget years immediately ahead.
    This is old news to those of us actually on the program. The flip side of this is that every major player has signed on to the new schedule and indicated they can meet it.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  13. #133
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    It seemed like things were leaning in that direction even to those on the outside.

  14. #134
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    Top German Technology for Hubble’s Successor
    http://www.mpg.de/english/illustrati...lease20051206/
    Carl Zeiss and Max Planck researchers develop technology for the world’s largest space telescope

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek
    Most notably, JWST's capabilities in the optical range will not be as powerful as originallly planned, primarily because ground scopes are expected to be able to match it in within the JWST operational timeframe.
    Yeah, with the exception of the "staring" ability that Hubble demonstrated on the Deep Field and Ultra Deep Field surveys. Kudos to the engineers for being able to get their adaptive optics up to orbital scope specs, but we're still sacrificing an important capability.

  16. #136
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    USATODAY.com - Clock in NYC shows cost of Iraq war
    A billboard in Times Sqaure counts the cost of the Iraq war starting at $134.5B and ... at a rate of $177M per day, $7.4M per hour and $122820 per minute. ...

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/politic...ar-clock_x.htm

    sigh... a lousy ten days would give all the money needed-plus one hell of a new years eve party to boot

    maybe one day???
    R.I.P. Bad Astronomy

  17. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by boppa
    USATODAY.com - Clock in NYC shows cost of Iraq war
    A billboard in Times Sqaure counts the cost of the Iraq war starting at $134.5B and ... at a rate of $177M per day, $7.4M per hour and $122820 per minute. ...

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/politic...ar-clock_x.htm

    sigh... a lousy ten days would give all the money needed-plus one hell of a new years eve party to boot

    maybe one day???
    Some space missions in this revealing new price unit:

    MER rover: 2 days and 6 hours (0.4 B)
    Cassini orbiter: 17 days (3 B)
    JWST: 20 days (3.5 B)
    Man on the Moon: estimated by NASA at roughly 594 days... (105 B)

    That's funny, putting a man on the Moon is only slightly cheaper than bringing democracy to the Middle-East!

  18. #138
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    cugel-u owe me one keyboard!!!

    its funny- but sad too

    mostly funny tho

    (what could we call this new monetary unit??)
    R.I.P. Bad Astronomy

  19. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by boppa
    (what could we call this new monetary unit??)
    The Baghdad?

    What would a manned mission to Mars cost?
    3 to 5 KBaghdad!

  20. #140
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    Let's not stray too far into politics here. (We're not there yet, but we're heading in that direction.)
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  21. #141
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    An interview with NASA Administrator Mike Griffin

    Q: How is the James Webb Space Telescope doing? It's under a lot of budget and technical pressure right now. Isn't it more important than ever to keep Hubble in operation?
    http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0512/05griffin/
    A: With regard to James Webb, what I can say - and this story is already out there - is James Webb is going to be delayed approximately two years, frankly to allow the technology to catch up with the requirements and because we're having to spend a little bit more on that technology than we anticipated doing. And in the context of the fixed budget allocation that we've got, we really don't have any choice except to slip James Webb out a couple of years. I mean James Webb continues to be the National Academy of Science's No. 1 priority in the astronomy line and we continue to agree and respect that priority. So there's no quibble, this is like going back to Hubble, which flew several years later than people had initially hoped and planned simply because it took a while to get it done. So there's no subtlety or mystery here. We'll fly James Webb as soon as we can and we think as soon as we can is a couple of years later than we first thought.

  22. #142
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    some real trouble ahead for the JWST ? The cuts are going deep everywhere on the science mission the NASA Project Terrestrial Planet Finder has been knocked back, delayed indefinitely - the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a to 2.shch-.metre infrared telescope built into a boeing 747 plane, will be put under "review" because it is behind schedule. It has been given no funding for the foreseeable future, Budget ax looms over telescopes
    http://starbulletin.com/2006/02/09/news/story01.html
    http://www.kpua.net/news.php?id=7466
    A NASA proposal cutting funds for a project on Mauna Kea has isle astronomers concerned - Funding for the Keck Outrigger Telescope project on Mauna Kea has been eliminated from NASA's draft 2007 budget, possibly killing the $50 million, four-telescope project

    Before these budget cuts came about it seems JWST had already cost over-runs

    JWST has ran up a $1 billion more than expected
    http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=18286
    JWST already squeezed
    http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=27932

  23. #143
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    As discussed here, JWST has taken its hits already and survived, albeit with a two-year delay. In fact, it's probably soaking up what little is left of NASA's science budget.

    (I work on JWST and haven't heard about any more budget hits since the two-year delay came through, so I'm assuming we're good.)
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  24. #144
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    I've been a big fan of the Spitzer and Hubble missions so its great to see the JWST moving forward again

    here's hoping it won't take any more budget hits

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    European rocket to lift NASA telescope
    http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbc...EWS02/60126001
    .... The unusual arrangement involves no cash but will save NASA tens of millions of dollars in launch costs at a time when the agency’s budget is shifting to support an estimated $100 billion program to send astronauts back to the moon. ..... Lewis said it was his understanding the State Department reviewed and approved a memorandum of understanding between NASA and ESA. A spokesman for NASA did not immediately return a call seeking a comment on the agreement.
    In November, NASA officials announced the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope would be delayed until 2013, nearly two years later than previously scheduled.
    Space agency officials blamed the delay on initial budget and schedule projections that were too optimistic.
    The Webb telescope will be a powerful observatory, far more capable than Hubble, which is nearing the end of its service life.


    Executive of the Year : Arianespace Jean-Yves Le Gall
    http://www.telecomweb.com/satellite/...over_story.htm
    Via Satellite: In 2005, NASA awarded
    Arianespace a significant civil contract, even though the United States has its own dedicated vehicles for civil missions. Do you see future U.S. civil missions for Arianespace?
    Le Gall: First, let me say that we are honored to be launching NASA’s flagship astronomy satellite, the James Webb Space Telescope. The decision demonstrates the trust NASA places in Arianespace to successfully launch this large and advanced spacecraft to L2. As far as the future is concerned, time will tell. It also will depend on the scale of future U.S. civil missions that materialize. And I am certain as space exploration advances, and continued growth is made with the International Space Station, there will be a strong need for cargo and scientific payloads to be sent to space....

  26. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard0802
    The mission duration is expected to be 5 - 10 years.
    gulp !


    I'm pretty shocked - all this effort, and then imagine if it only worked fo 5 years !

    That time better be used very wisely !

    on a related note, I would like to hear your opinion on the naming of the JWST; especially ToSeek's take on this.
    the reason is I once got kicked out of an astronomy chatroom for suggesting that I thought James Webb was a poor choice...

    Now, I don't want to lessen Webb's merits, but, IMO, naming the JWST after him just doesn't fit.
    After all, he didn't really discover anything breathtaking, create some deep-space theories or formulae - he was "just" an administrator, a manager, a bureaucrat (albeit a rather good one).
    I mean, there are easily dozens of names that I would prefer. Schwarzschild, Einstein, Chandrasekhar, Zwicky, Schmidt..or....or Humason.
    Yup, I think Humason would be my favorite.

    But J.W. ... he just doesn't click with the idea behind the JWST - or am I missing something?

    No offense meant.

    What do y'all think?

    good night,

    -z.

  27. #147
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    Because JWST is an international project, naming it after a NASA administrator is especially unsuitable.

  28. #148
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    I also felt like naming it after James Webb was kind of a letdown. As you point out, many other space observing platforms have been named after famous long-dead scientists whose ideas have changed the world of astronomy. We are running out of names of the caliber of Einstein, Newton, Kepler, Hipparcos, etc. Who would you name it for?
    Forming opinions as we speak

  29. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb
    I also felt like naming it after James Webb was kind of a letdown. As you point out, many other space observing platforms have been named after famous long-dead scientists whose ideas have changed the world of astronomy. We are running out of names of the caliber of Einstein, Newton, Kepler, Hipparcos, etc. Who would you name it for?
    Although I have to say that, given the assorted and vasty changing winds which have blown through the NASA administrator's office while this project has been in progress, naming it after a former NASA administrator might yet turn out to be the most effective insurance policy JWST could have had. At this point, JWST and the chance of one more HST servicing mission are the only parts of the NASA space-astronomy program that seem to be surviving relatively unscathed in budget plans. (Although I do like the notion of a Zwicky Space Telescope...). There is always the problem of memorializing your most prominent folks first and then having later names for more powerful instruments reaching down into the barrel.

    (But then, I published a paper based on calculations performed using what was, at the time, the George C. Wallace Supercomputer Center. I conveniently forgot this part of the name in the paper's acknowledgements, and the name was changed so soon thereafter that no one every complained...)

  30. #150
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    Letter from AURA to House Science Commitee Regarding JWST (6 Mar 2006)
    http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=19856
    STATUS REPORT

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