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Thread: Discussion: Supernova's Companion Star Found

  1. #1
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    SUMMARY: When the second brightest supernova seen in modern times, SN 1993J, blew up several years ago, it did leave a survivor. Using the Hubble Space Telescope, and several ground-based observatories, an international team of astronomers discovered a massive companion star that must have been orbiting the supernova at the time it exploded. This discovery is very important because it will allow astronomers watch what the remnant of SN 1993J does to its companion star. They might even be able to detect a neutron star or black hole forming in real time.

    What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

  2. #2
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    [/QUOTE]an international team of astronomers discovered a massive companion star that must have been orbiting the supernova at the time it exploded[QUOTE]
    Not necessarily:
    I think it confirms that a supernova is really the "fissioning" event that formed this massive star, fissioning is a process proposed in the Electric Universe model, see:
    http://www.electric-cosmos.org/hrdiagr.htm
    I think after a supernova (or nova) a companion will always be found (anything from a brown dwarf to such a massive star, depending on the violence of the event). The problem is that there's no way to be sure there was a companion before the event. The same thing is true for V838 Mon, there's a companion star now, but was there a companion before? Maybe a survey of all the known (super)nova events will show us how many stars are binaries.
    Cheers.

  3. #3
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    Wow! The Electric Universe Theory is really simple. Makes a lot of sense to me, but then, I took classes in college over 15 years and never graduated because I couldn't decide on a major. Doesn't it boil down to the old "energy is never lost, just changes form"? It seems much more plausible than original theory in discussion.

  4. #4
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    I have the article about SN 1993J, I think its located in Messier Cluster # 80 or 81 or 83 something liek that...and It cools down really quick after the explosion. So no wonder there might be a Black Hole exist or not.

  5. #5
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    What is the formation process of a black hole? At what point does it become a black hole? and at what point does whatever was there disappear off the screen because of the new black hole?

  6. #6
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    What is the formation process of a black hole?
    WD and N.Star >>>>Battle between Gravity and D.Pressure(gravity Win)>>>>>Black Hole Stage

    At what point does it become a black hole?
    A black hole originates in the collapse of the iron core that forms just prior to the supernova of a very high mass star. A collapse steller core weight more than 3Msun >>>>Black Hole.

    at what point does whatever was there disappear off the screen because of the new black hole?
    Dunno :huh:

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