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Thread: International Space Station

  1. #241
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    Is NASA's ISS price hike a conspiracy to kill entrepreneurial space? (a strongly worded editorial)

    https://spacenews.com/op-ed-do-not-c...l-cooperation/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #242
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    "IT’S OFFICIAL — A NASA ASTRONAUT WILL BE ABOARD NEXT SOYUZ LAUNCH"

    https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/i...-soyuz-launch/

    NASA and its Russian counterpart, Roscosmos, today announced that NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei will be aboard Soyuz MS-18 when it launches to the International Space Station (ISS) next month. The deal is not between NASA and Roscosmos, however, but through an intermediary, the U.S. company Axiom Space.


    NASA officials have been saying since 2018 that they want to ensure at least one Russian and one American are onboard ISS at all times to operate their respective systems.
    I am because we are
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  3. #243
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    Why do we need the ISS? The International Space Station is the most expensive and most complex engineering project ever. What are the societal benefits of maintaining an orbital outpost that we mere mortals will never get to visit?

    https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...-need-the-iss/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Why do we need the ISS? The International Space Station is the most expensive and most complex engineering project ever. What are the societal benefits of maintaining an orbital outpost that we mere mortals will never get to visit?

    https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...-need-the-iss/
    I know they put in "What are the societal benefits of maintaining an orbital outpost that we mere mortals will never get to visit?" into the title just to get attention, and they are of course arguing the benefits of the ISS, but the fact that the average person will never visit it is an insultingly stupid argument against it. Are the only worthwhile things those that I am going to personally use? Does anyone ever actually make that as an argument? That doesn't have enough strength to even be made of straw (as in a strawman argument).
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  5. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I know they put in "What are the societal benefits of maintaining an orbital outpost that we mere mortals will never get to visit?" into the title just to get attention, and they are of course arguing the benefits of the ISS, but the fact that the average person will never visit it is an insultingly stupid argument against it.
    Agreed, and having once been a magazine editor I also understand why it was done, but it was still stupid.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #246
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    Microbes Unknown to Science Discovered on The International Space Station -- This is not a headline I would want to see if I were an ISS astronaut.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/four-ba...r-space-plants
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #247
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    Could be a cure for cancer out of this. I focus on capabilities-not cost. My only gripe is in chunking the old batteries. They should have been a back-up. Hook it up to an emitter...a tether...something.

  8. #248
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    I just watched some of the port relocation procedure for the Crew Dragon attached to the ISS. I don't understand why it had to have four astronauts riding along to make a 60-meter maneuver?

  9. #249
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    Yup. the astronauts always make time for a ride. Heh heh.

    Actually, the crew assigned to the vehicle always rides along during a re-docking in case there is a failure, in which case they proceed to return to Earth. Otherwise, a rescue craft would need to be sent up.

  10. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    Yup. the astronauts always make time for a ride. Heh heh.

    Actually, the crew assigned to the vehicle always rides along during a re-docking in case there is a failure, in which case they proceed to return to Earth. Otherwise, a rescue craft would need to be sent up.
    I figured it was something like that (do they get to pack a toothbrush?) but I couldn’t find any references. Thanks!

  11. #251
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    Russia decides to abandon the International Space Station (ISS) news link says Russia will stop using the ISS after 2025
    https://www.easternherald.com/2021/0...e-station-iss/
    Website Russia Today - 'Russia to withdraw from International Space Station starting from 2025, deputy PM confirms, as Moscow works on replacement'
    https://www.rt.com/russia/521414-iss-russia-quits-2025/

    Previous news

    There have also been suggestions that the station could be converted to commercial operations
    commerce operations after it is retired by government entities

    In July 2018, the Space Frontier Act of 2018 was intended to extend operations of the ISS to 2030. This bill was unanimously approved in the Senate, but failed to pass in the U.S. House. In September 2018, the Leading Human Spaceflight Act was introduced with the intent to extend operations of the ISS to 2030, and was confirmed in December 2018

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/24/1...t-request-2025 , https://www.spacenews.com/house-join...to-extend-iss/

  12. #252
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    "Roscosmos discusses ISS withdrawal strategy and new space station for mid-2020s"

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2021...for-mid-2020s/

    Recently, Russian authorities began talking about a potential withdrawal from the International Space Station (ISS) project in 2025. In place of ISS, the Russian space industry would gain ROSS – a new orbital station that’s name stands for Russian Orbital Service Station.

    According to Roscosmos representatives, the withdrawal from the ISS will be gradual, which means that for some time the ISS and ROSS will work in space in parallel. At the same time, Russia and China have plans to build a lunar space station together.
    I am because we are
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  13. #253
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    The US & partners are planning an exit from ISS in 2029 - 2030. Replacing it will be a NASA program called 'Commercial LEO Destinations,' which will use commercial space stations like those from Axiom Space and Sierra Space.

    Text PDF...

    Slideshow PDF...

    Companies responding,

    Airbus
    Blue Origin
    Boeing
    Firefly
    Lockheed Martin
    Nanoracks
    Northrop Grumman
    Redwire
    Sierra Space (Sierra Nevada Corp.)
    SpaceX
    Virgin Galactic
    Virgin Orbit
    Voyager
    York

    2.4 Project Schedule

    NASA will commence its support activities with the participant upon execution of the SAA, which is targeted for early FY 2022 and will end those activities in late FY 2025. For purposes of the proposal, participants shall assume Phase II service contract award at the beginning of FY26 and transition of NASA utilization from ISS to CLD over the FY29-30 period. As described in section 2.3, the participant is requested to propose an Optional Period with additional milestones to achieve a CDR-level of maturity.
    >

  14. #254
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    "Canadian manipulator on ISS holed by space debris"

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/C...ebris_999.html

    Space debris hit the Canadian remote robotic system onboard the International Space Station (ISS), leaving a small hole in it, but the incident did not affect the operation of the device, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) said on Friday.

    "While the utmost precautions are taken to reduce the potential for collisions with the ISS, impacts with tiny objects do occur. One such hit was noticed recently during a routine inspection of Canadarm2 on May 12. Experts from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and NASA worked together to take detailed images of the area and assess the impact, which occurred on one of Canadarm2's boom segments," the agency said in a statement.

    It noted that the device remained fully operating despite the hit, which damaged "a small section of the arm boom and thermal blanket."
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  15. #255
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    "Why is Russia launching a new module to the space station if it’s pulling out?"

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021...y-take-flight/

    The Russian space corporation, Roscosmos, released photos on Monday showing the much-anticipated Nauka space station module enclosed in its payload fairing. This will be Russia's first significant addition to the International Space Station in more than a decade, and it will provide the Russians with their first module dedicated primarily to research. "Nauka" means science in Russian.

    This is a sizable module, including crew quarters, an airlock for scientific experiments, and much more. With a mass of about 24 metric tons, it is about 20 percent larger than the biggest Russian segment of the station, the Zvezda service module.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  16. #256
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    NASA TV will broadcast the launch of the Nauka module on July 21 and the docking on July 29. The Nauka module will replace the Pirs docking module. NASA TV will also cover the undocking of the Pirs module on July 23. https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...ure-of-another

  17. #257
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    Russia launched their Nauka module

    At least it didn't auger itself into the Kazakhstan steppe

    https://youtu.be/9-xBhU7ZI7s

    http://parabolicarc.com/2021/07/21/r...le-into-orbit/

  18. #258
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    Uh-Oh...

    Anatoly Zak @RussianSpaceWeb
    UPDATE: #Nauka's main engines (pictured in operation) are currently out of commission. Specialists are troubleshooting the issue and developing a backup rendezvous plan. The module has ~30 stable orbits at current altitude. EXCLUSIVE DETAILS: http://russianspaceweb.com/insider-content.html
    ||
    Replying to @RussianSpaceWeb
    Mission control might attempt Nauka's orbit correction in coming hours. DETAILS: http://russianspaceweb.com/insider-conten
    ||
    Despite what you might read in the Russian press, there was no engine firing attempts aboard #Nauka as of this moment...

    https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/...96367831339010

  19. #259
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    Ouch. From comments there may be other engines and thrusters that might be used if these can’t be restarted, but can they supply enough velocity change? Well, crossed fingers here.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  20. #260
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    Apparently good news? According to Ars Technica, this tweet from roscosmos says the propulsion system is okay:

    https://twitter.com/roscosmos/status...87587467350019

    I can’t read Russian but machine translation results in this:

    The test firing of the propulsion system of the # Science module and the orbit formation impulse have been worked out routinely.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  21. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Uh-Oh...

    Anatoly Zak @RussianSpaceWeb
    UPDATE: #Nauka's main engines (pictured in operation) are currently out of commission. Specialists are troubleshooting the issue and developing a backup rendezvous plan. The module has ~30 stable orbits at current altitude. EXCLUSIVE DETAILS: http://russianspaceweb.com/insider-content.html
    ||
    Replying to @RussianSpaceWeb
    Mission control might attempt Nauka's orbit correction in coming hours. DETAILS: http://russianspaceweb.com/insider-conten
    ||
    Despite what you might read in the Russian press, there was no engine firing attempts aboard #Nauka as of this moment...

    https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/...96367831339010
    Hmmm...those russianweb.com links don't work for me and/or require login.

    ETA: This works. Looks like they achieved orbit successfully.

    Russia’s new space station module, dubbed Nauka, is currently en route to the ISS, but the spacecraft initially failed to complete its first orbit-raising burn, leading to concerns that it might not complete the trip. Thankfully, the Nauka team on Earth was able to perform a course correction, and the module is now in the proper orbit to continue its journey.

    Nauka, it would appear, is taking its bad luck along with it into space.

    The Russian Multipurpose Laboratory, as its formally known, has been in the works since the late 1990s, and it was supposed to launch back in 2007, but an array of technical problems—from dirty fuel tanks through to aging components—prevented this from happening. Two components of the module, the airlock and a radiator, were launched to the ISS 11 years ago, where they’ve been lying in wait ever since.
    Wonder if they are out of warranty?

  22. #262
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    What I saw somewhere (don't remember) yesterday is that they used a secondary propulsion system to get to the right orbit but the primary is still not functioning.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #263
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    Looks like the immediate issues with the Nauka module firing thrusters when it shouldn’t have are now resolved. Article below. I wonder if we’ll hear how this happened in the first place, things could have gone much worse.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021...on/?comments=1

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  24. #264
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    Nauka is beginning to sound like a catastrophe waiting to happpen.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #265
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    AIUI, which could be wrong in part or completely, this was an extension of the thruster issues they'd suffered going uphill,

    ISS was in float mode, RCS disabled for docking. After docking Nauka started thrusting and rotated ISS 45° out of position. This was made worse by the ISS<-->Nauka umbilicals not yet being connected so no local commands, and ISS was not in sight of a Russian ground station. Eventually they restarted RCS control, then handed it off to a docked Progress so it and Nauka could play tug-o-war. Only after Nauka ran out of propellant did it stop thrusting. Meanwhile, 2 cosmonauts were in the docking vestibule having an...adventure..
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2021-Jul-30 at 06:26 AM.

  26. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    AIUI, which could be wrong in part or completely, this was an extension of the thruster issues they'd suffered going uphill,

    ISS was in float mode, RCS disabled for docking. After docking Nauka started thrusting and rotated ISS 45° out of position. This was made worse by the ISS<-->Nauka umbilicals not yet being connected so no local commands, and ISS was not in sight of a Russian ground station. Eventually they restarted RCS control, then handed it off to a docked Progress so it and Nauka could play tug-o-war. Only after Nauka ran out of propellant did it stop thrusting. Meanwhile, 2 cosmonauts were in the docking vestibule having an...adventure..
    Did they hire Boeing as contractor for this assembly?

  27. #267
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    Excellent (as usual) video from Scott Manley.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #268
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Did they hire Boeing as contractor for this assembly?
    Nope, it's been sitting in a warehouse. It was a backup for the first ISS module, then repurposed. A few weeks before launch someone figured out the MMOD shield hadn't been installed, then they discovered it had never been manufactured. Oops.

  29. #269
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    https://spacenews.com/starliner-rese...-iss-problems/

    >
    Vladimir Solovyov, designer general of RSC Energia and flight director of the Russian segment of the ISS, said in a Roscosmos statement July 30 that the thruster firing was caused by a software problem. “Due to a short-term software failure, a direct command was mistakenly implemented to turn on the module’s engines for withdrawal, which led to some modification of the orientation of the complex as a whole,” he said.
    >
    However, the situation may have been more serious than what NASA originally claimed. Publicly available telemetry showed much greater excursions in roll, pitch and yaw during the hour it took to restore the station’s attitude.
    Zebulon Scoville @Explorer_Flight
    Was force fight between MLM and ISS SM thrusters. Based upon moment arm, the ISS brought a knife to a gun fight. Reports of ISS only being 45 degrees out were premature. That was first call from ADCO. We proceeded to do headstands and cartwheels. Olympic judges would be proud.

    https://twitter.com/Explorer_Flight/...89335520923649
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2021-Aug-02 at 03:20 AM.

  30. #270
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    Remember that hole found in a Soyuz? Well, TASS and Roscosmos are trying to blame an American astronaut, Serena Aunon-Chancellor. The evidence is poor at best, it appears to be an attempt to shift blame from manufacturing and quality control testing, and suspiciously comes at a time when there was buzz about the problems with the “new” module. NASA’s response was lackluster, presumed to be about not wanting to get into a big fight over this claim. More and more, it is looking like it is getting close to the time to end this particular example of international cooperation. Article here:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021...under-the-bus/

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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