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Thread: International Space Station

  1. #31
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    Interesting article in "NewSpace India" where it tries to look at the financial cost to India of joining the ISS and concludes it is not cost justified.

    I agree with the present budget ISRO has, it will just not be doable. The present priority for ISRO should be to get GSLV MKIII tested and operational. It will take another 3 to 4 years to do that. By that time the ISS will be on its last legs and it will just be too late to justify India joining as a full member of that mission. Better to spend what spare $$$ in building their next rocket (ULV) as well as their own manned capsule.

  2. #32
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    We have heard from time to time, how Russia plans to use part of its current modules of the ISS for its future space station. Intresting to note int the current discussion with NASA on how to, "refine procedures relating to the disposal of the Station at the end of its service life, or in the event of an emergency", there is no talk about separating the modules first.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016...-requirements/

    While the hardware-limiting factor requires no immediate demand for a deorbit plan, an emergency scenario – where the Station becomes crippled and has to be evacuated – would potentially call for its disposal within a relatively short timescale.

    NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) members have taken a keen interest in the safe disposal of the Station, known as the EOL (End Of Life) game plan.

    Back in 2013, the ASAP heard from (former) ISS Program manager Mike Suffredini, who described the evaluations on what would be an EOL scenario for the Station.

    “NASA now has a plan so that in the event the Station must be evacuated, there will be a 14-day period in which to make a decision on whether or not to bring the ISS down,” noted Mr. Suffredini at the time. “The Program is setting the contingency plan in place, although there is still a lot of work to be done.”

    That initial plan called for a period of 180 days to allow the Station to decay its path towards the deorbit altitude.

    During this period, Russia would launch two Russian Progress vehicles to autonomously transfer propellant to the Service Module thrusters and to prepare themselves to provide additional deorbit propulsion.

    However, further evaluations noted this was a simplified emergency plan and further considerations had to be made to ensure the huge structure would be destroyed over a safe area of ocean.

    Almost three years later, the ASAP heard of a new TIM-level meeting between NASA and Roscosmos, held at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) at the end of April.

  3. #33
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    Congratulations ISS International Space Station completes 100,000th orbit

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...00000th-orbit/

    The International Space Station (ISS) has completed its 100,000th orbit around Earth. For the past 17 years, the outpost has been a hub of scientific advancement, international cooperation, and fantastic views of our home world.

    At 12:10 a.m. EDT (06:10 GMT) on Monday, May 16, 2016, the ISS began its 100,000th orbit since the launch of the first element—the Zarya Functional Cargo Block—which took place on Nov. 20, 1998 atop a Russian Proton-K rocket.

    “It’s a tribute to the teams that designed [ISS], that put it together, the programs that keep us flying safe, the people that work 24/7 365 days a year to keep us effectively executing the mission and executing it safely,” said Expedition 47 Flight Engineer and NASA astronaut, Jeff Williams.

    The ISS is a partnership between five major space agencies: NASA, Roscosmos, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). All total, some 16 different nations are involved with the project.

    Flying more than 2.6 billion miles, the outpost has seen visitors and crews from 18 different countries. Over 220 individual astronauts and cosmonauts have floated through the station’s modules, including the current Expedition 47 crew: NASA astronauts Williams and Tim Kopra (the Expedition 47 Commander), ESA astronaut Tim Peake, and Russian cosmonauts Aleksy Ovchinin, Oleg Skripochka, and Yuri Malenchenko.

  4. #34
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    Does that mean it is no longer under warranty?
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Does that mean it is no longer under warranty?
    It's due to have its oil changed.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It's due to have its oil changed.
    They have to rotate the solar panels as well.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Does that mean it is no longer under warranty?
    Dinged already! https://twitter.com/astro_timpeake/s...46160944717825

    The culprit being a paint fleck from a Wal-Mart shopping cart no doubt.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Dinged already! https://twitter.com/astro_timpeake/s...46160944717825

    The culprit being a paint fleck from a Wal-Mart shopping cart no doubt.
    Yikes. What do they intend to do about that?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Yikes. What do they intend to do about that?
    Call the Glass Doctor, they'll fix your panes!
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  10. #40
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    The next launches of Soyuz and Progress spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS) are being delayed because of problems with the docking system.

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...gress-launches

    Both spacecraft have recently been upgraded to "MS" versions. The upcoming Soyuz launch is the first of the MS variant (MS-01), while the first Progress MS was launched in December 2015.

    The Soyuz spacecraft has been upgraded several times since it was first launched in 1967. Soyuz MS replaces the Soyuz TMA-M series. The MS version has improved solar arrays, a new digital computer, and a new docking system.

    TASS reported today that the launch of Soyuz MS-01 has been delayed from June 24 to July 7 "due to control system flaws that may disrupt the ship's docking with the ISS." July 7 was the date of the next Progress MS launch, which is now rescheduled for July 17.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It's due to have its oil changed.
    They'll probably take the opportunity to tell you it needs a lot of other stuff done, too. Don't fall for it!
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  12. #42
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    It is still many years away but do you know where the International Space Station will go to die?

    http://www.popsci.com/this-is-where-...will-go-to-die

    The cold void of the ocean floor is the closest thing Earthlings can come to the conditions of space. Nothing really lives there, and nothing ever visits. It’s freezing, dark and empty. However, off the coast of New Zealand, the Pacific Ocean is home to what may be the most exclusive scientific burial ground in the world: the so-called Spacecraft Cemetery has become the final resting place for hundreds of manmade space objects.

  13. #43
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    ISS is being upgraded with the addition of the multipurpose Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NA...enter_999.html

    NICER is an Astrophysics Mission of Opportunity within NASA's Explorer program, which provides frequent flight opportunities for world-class scientific investigations from space utilizing innovative, streamlined and efficient management approaches within the heliophysics and astrophysics science areas. NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate supports the SEXTANT component of the mission, demonstrating pulsar-based spacecraft navigation.

    Neutron stars, which squeeze up to twice the sun's mass into a city-size volume, are powerfully bound by gravity that is exceeded only around black holes. Theory has advanced a host of models to describe the physics of neutron star interiors, including the very nature of high-density matter that cannot be produced in any laboratory on Earth. NICER's astrophysical observations will test these models.

    Some rapidly rotating neutron stars, called pulsars, are cosmic lighthouses that sweep narrow beams of radiation through space as they spin. Pulsars can spin up to hundreds of times every second, producing flashes of light from radio through gamma rays detected at Earth with clock-like regularity.

    NICER will exploit these pulsations to perform cutting-edge astrophysics investigations while another aspect of the mission - the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) project - demonstrates a technological first: real-time, autonomous spacecraft navigation using pulsars as beacons, ultimately furthering deep space exploration into the solar system and beyond.

    NICER's X-ray Timing Instrument (XTI) offers an unprecedented combination of capabilities to view the emissions of neutron stars in "soft" X-ray light (less energetic than the X-rays typically used for medical imaging). A bundle of 56 co-aligned optics and X-ray sensors, the instrument represents an innovative configuration of flight-proven components, minimizing risk and meeting the science investigation's demands of fast timing and the ability to measure the energies of detected X-ray photons.

  14. #44
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    Bigelow has indicated they were interested in attaching their B330 expandable modules on the ISS as a precursor to its planned commercial space stations. Now they might have competition as another has also indicated they too might want to do the same. NASA will have to decide of one or two extra modules can attach to the ISS and if only one, which one.

    http://spacenews.com/former-nasa-iss...ation-venture/

    Once the ISS reaches the end of its life, currently planned for no earlier than 2024, Axiom Space would remove the module from the station. It would then become the core of a new commercial space station with the addition of various modules and hardware, including an airlock, docking node, and power and propulsion equipment.

    Suffredini believes that there is a robust market for a commercial space station. A study commissioned by Axiom Space concluded the addressable market for such a station could be as large as $37 billion between 2020 and 2030, combining various commercial and government uses.

    Axiom Space’s plans, though, could put it into conflict with Bigelow Aerospace. In April, Bigelow announced it had started discussions with NASA about installing one of its B330 expandable modules on the ISS as a precursor to its planned commercial space stations.

    Bigelow already has a presence on the ISS with its Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a demonstration of expandable module technology developed under a NASA contract. BEAM arrived at the station on a commercial cargo flight in April and expanded to its full size in May, and will remain there for up to two years.

    Suffredini noted that neither his company nor Bigelow have any deals yet with NASA to install modules. It’s also unclear if the station could accommodate both companies’ modules. “Ports are a precious resource,” he said, referring to docking ports on the ISS. “NASA has to figure out how to deal with that.”

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  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    We have heard from time to time, how Russia plans to use part of its current modules of the ISS for its future space station. Intresting to note int the current discussion with NASA on how to, "refine procedures relating to the disposal of the Station at the end of its service life, or in the event of an emergency", there is no talk about separating the modules first.
    Looks like I was wrong on this one and the Russians are planing to use part of the current modules!!!

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/spac...e-station-iss/

    Russia's main contractor in human space flight just detailed its plans to separate the newest modules from the International Space Station (ISS) once the long-lived project comes to an end in the 2020s. It plans to build a new habitable base in Earth orbit called the Russian Orbital Station, or ROS. The outpost will include three modules initially, possibly joined by two more in the future.

    Russian plans to split the ISS have been circulating for years. Now, for a host of political, financial, and technical reasons, this isn't just a wild idea on paper anymore.

  17. #47
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    Wow I did not know that. We have been doing research for 10 years on plant biology using the ISS.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A_...space_999.html

    On this day 10 years ago, Space Shuttle Discovery was launched to the International Space Station carrying ESA's European Modular Cultivation System - a miniature greenhouse to probe how plants grow in weightlessness. From looking at how plants know where to grow roots to how light can influence growth, and how the tips of plant roots bend as they grow, it is a flagship research facility on the orbiting complex.

    Installed by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter in 2006, it nurtures plants from seedlings to maturity, and allows both astronauts and research teams on the ground to intervene and change the conditions. Every aspect of the growing environment can be regulated - temperature, atmosphere, water and light - and two centrifuges simulate gravity up to twice Earth's level to compare how plants respond to different degrees of gravity.

  18. #48
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    The ISS to be upgraded with two new docking ports that Boeing Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft will use when they start docking with ISS. Because the adapter is designed to an international standard, future spacecraft will be able to dock there, too.

    The 1st of the new docking ports will be carried to the ISS by the SpaceX CRS-9 mission.

    http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/07/...-port-station/

    A metallic ring big enough for astronauts and cargo to fit through is scheduled to fly to the International Space Station in July as part of the cargo aboard a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft loaded with materials for the orbiting laboratory and its crew. The ring is known as an International Docking Adapter, or IDA, and its main purpose is to provide a port for spacecraft bringing astronauts to the station in the future.
    The Dragon and its cargo will fly into orbit aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that will take about 10 minutes to lift the spacecraft from its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an orbit to catch up with the station. It will take about two days for the Dragon to reach the station. Once within reach of the station’s robotic arm, the Dragon will be berthed to the orbital complex by the astronauts already on the station.

    Outfitted with a host of sensors and systems, the adapter is built so spacecraft systems can automatically perform all the steps of rendezvous and dock with the station without input from the astronauts. Manual backup systems will be in place on the spacecraft to allow the crew to take over steering duties, if needed.

    “It’s a passive system which means it doesn’t take any action by the crew to allow docking to happen and I think that’s really the key,” said David Clemen Boeing’s director of Development/Modifications for the space station.

  19. #49
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    Russia considering cutting its crew size for the ISS from 3 to 2 as a cost cutting measure.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...cing-iss-crew/

    Russia is considering reducing its International Space Station (ISS) crew from three to two, a Roscosmos official said last week. The proposal is seen by the agency as a way to increase efficiency and reduce costs of the country’s space program.

    On Thursday, Aug. 11, Russian newspaper Izvestia reported that Sergei Krikalev, director of manned programs at Roscosmos, has announced potential plans to reduce the number of cosmonauts and started soliciting this idea among the ISS international partners.

    “We have sent letters to the ISS program participants, we want to hear their opinion on how we should reduce the crew and when, there are nuances here,” Krikalev told Izvestia. “We are interested in the opinion of Mission Control, the Institute of Medical and Biological Problems, our partners in the ISS.”

  20. #50
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    New port installed on the ISS.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...space-station/

    Two members of the International Space Station’s Expedition 48 crew stepped outside the orbital complex to install a new “front porch”. The nearly six-hour long spacewalk started at 7:04 a.m. CDT (12:04 GMT) Aug. 19 with a goal to install International Docking Adapter-2 (IDA-2) to the forward end of the station.

    NASA astronauts Jeff Williams and Kate Williams, commander and flight engineer, respectively, each tag-teamed to install IDA-2 as the primary task of the mission. The adapter was brought to the space station by way of SpaceX‘s CRS-9 Dragon. It has remained inside the trunk since arriving at the outpost one month ago.

  21. #51
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    The next manned flight to the ISS is delayed due to a short circuit.

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/2016.html#ms02

    On September 17, Roskosmos announced that after final tests of the spacecraft, its launch had to be postponed from September 23. The new launch date has not been announced. According to industry sources, the delay was caused by a short circuit, which took place during roll-on of the payload fairing, which protects the spacecraft during its ascent through the atmosphere. The problem was not detected until the vehicle had been rotated back to a vertical position and was being prepared for the second fit check at Site 254 in Baikonur. The situation was complicated by the fact that engineers could not immediately identify the location of the short circuit in the fully assembled spacecraft. Preliminary estimates indicated that such an issue inside the descent module, SA, could require several weeks to fix, however if the problem was in the instrument module, PAO, it could take several months to resolve.

    In worst case scenario, mission officials might decide to replace the Soyuz vehicle No. 732, which was affected by the problem, with Vehicle No. 733 originally intended for the Soyuz MS-03 mission. According to the official Russian media, the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 might be postponed until at least the beginning of October.

  22. #52
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    It is now official. The Russians will reduce their astronauts on the ISS from 3 to 2. They have also set a new launch date for the manned mission to the ISS to 1st of November.

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...n-crews-to-two

    Russia's TASS news service reports today that the new launch date for Soyuz MS-02 is November 1. The launch had been scheduled for this Friday, September 23, but was postponed for technical reasons. Separately, Russia has decided to reduce the number of cosmonauts it has aboard the International Space Station (ISS) from three to two in order to reduce resupply requirements.

  23. #53
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    Soyuz MS-02 team faces dangerous repairs

    Originally scheduled for launch tomorrow, Sept. 23, 2016, the Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft was hit with a mysterious short circuit last week, which required postponing the mission indefinitely. After pinpointing the problem to an improperly bent cable located behind cosmonauts seats in the descent module, Russian engineers now have to repair the vehicle loaded with toxic propellants and pressurized gases despite existing safety rules prohibiting such operations, RussianSpaceWeb.com learned. Details below.

  24. #54
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    Work on the MLM module which is supposed to attach to the ISS has stalled again.

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_f...#2016_politics

    In the course of 2016, the launch of the MLM module slipped again to December 2017, or around six months behind the previously quoted launch date. According to a press-release issued by RKK Energia on June 20, the company completed the manufacturing and testing of unidentified equipment for the interior of the module.

    At the same time, the head of RKK Energia was quoted as saying that the development of documentation and the installation of large pieces of hardware on the exterior of the spacecraft had entered the final stage.

    However, as of middle of September, all the work on the assembly of the MLM module had stalled again. According to industry sources, most of replacement components for the MLM's faulty propulsion system had already been manufactured, except for the pipelines, which would have to be bent based on their particular situation on the module. Still, military quality control officers, who now certify all space industry manufacturing operations, refused to give the green light for the final assembly of the propulsion system for the MLM.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2016-Oct-01 at 06:27 AM. Reason: excendetly over wrote the original posting.

  25. #55
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    New date for the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 mission.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...ed-october-19/

    Russia has re-scheduled the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 mission to the International Space Station (ISS), setting Oct. 19 as the new launch date. The spacecraft assigned to transport the three Expedition 49 crew members to the orbiting lab are scheduled to lift off atop a Soyuz-FG launcher, at 4:03 a.m. EDT (8:03 GMT), from Site 1/5 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

    “It is planned that the primary and backup crews depart for the launch site on October 7. The launch is scheduled for October 19, 11:03 Moscow time (08:03 GMT),” a source in the Russian rocket and space industry told TASS.

    The start of the Soyuz MS-02 mission was initially targeted for Sept. 23 but was delayed due to a technical malfunction – a burned cable inside the spacecraft. Last week, the Roscosmos State Corporation announced that the launch would be rescheduled for Nov. 1. It was decided to send the crew back to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center near Moscow to continue training until the new launch date gets closer.

    Soyuz MS-02 will be the second mission of the upgraded Soyuz-MS spacecraft. The crew for this mission consists of NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrei Borisenko.

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Work on the MLM module which is supposed to attach to the ISS has stalled again.
    The problem with the MLM module is more political in nature rather than technical.

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_f...#2016_politics

    The stumbling block holding the assembly of the MLM has apparently a political nature rather than any real engineering justification. According to industry sources, the management at the military certification authority apparently ran into worsening relations with the leadership of the space industry. Ironically, it was a severe oversight on the part of the military certification officials that previously cleared the module for launch with a damaged propulsion system, industry sources charged. This time, political pressure from the top would probably be needed to move things forward, sources told RussianSpaceWeb.com.

  27. #57
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    Russia is planing to upgrade their cargo ship, Progress, to carry an extra ton of cargo. This will enable them to cut the number of cargo trips from 4 to 3 a year.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/spac...go-space-ship/

    Russian engineers are finishing the design of a brand new space freighter that would replace the veteran Progress cargo ships supplying the International Space Station (ISS) with propellant, food, water and other goods, industry sources tell Popular Mechanics.

    The new vehicle will be about a ton heavier than its predecessor and will feature a radical new design. If it's actually built, the next-generation cargo ship will allow Russia to reduce the number of annual cargo shipments to the ISS from four to three while still delivering all necessary provisions for three people to live more or less permanently aboard the ISS.

  28. #58
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    Another new facility to be introduced to the ISS.

    http://spacenews.com/airbus-signs-up...tion-platform/

    An Australian company that is developing an electric thruster is the first customer for an external research platform Airbus Defence and Space plans to install on the International Space Station by the end of 2018.

    At a ceremony at the International Astronautical Congress here Sept. 28, Airbus signed an agreement with Neumann Space to host a payload on Airbus’ Bartolomeo platform. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

    Neumann Space is an Australian company developing a solar-electric thruster that uses metallic fuels rather than a gas like xenon. The company believes that the thruster will have a higher performance versus conventional electric thrusters and be able to use a wide range of metals as fuels.

    The company will install an experimental payload on Bartolomeo, a platform that Airbus plans to mount on the exterior of the Columbus module for experiments that require access to the space environment.

  29. #59
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    The launch date MLM module for the ISS has slipped to March 2018.

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_f...#2016_politics

    The flight version of the spacecraft currently remains at Khrunichev factory in the District of Fili in Moscow with only a partially assembled propulsion system. The official schedule still calls for the launch of the spacecraft at the end of 2017, however, in order to meet this deadline, all key systems have to be assembled and the module needs to leave Fili for Baikonur Cosmodrome in April 2017. A processing team in Baikonur will need next eight months to test and fuel the 19-ton spacecraft and prepare it for integration with its Proton rocket. According to officials close to the project, the December 2017 launch deadline could still be met, however, more likely, the MLM mission will have to be postponed for a few months into the beginning of 2018.

    When discussing with European space officials the launch of the European Robotic Arm, ERA, on the MLM module, their Russian colleagues indicated that the mission had been tentatively planned for March 2018.

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    Next launch of the crew to the ISS is now been confirmed. It is October 19, 11:05 Moscow Time

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/soyuz-ms-02.html#program

    On October 6, 2016, the State Commission overseeing the launch certified the results of the spacecraft repairs and approved the new launch manifest for the Russian missions to the ISS:

    October 19, 11:05 Moscow Time: Soyuz MS-02 launch;

    October 30: Landing of the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft;

    November 16: Soyuz MS-03 launch;

    December 1: Progress MS-04 launch.

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