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Thread: International Space Station

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?
    It might have let in some superheated plasma maybe?
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  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?
    Depends on the rate of pressure loss. If it were a very slow leak then probably not much effect because the astronauts are (supposed to be) in the descent module for only a few hours, and suited. That said, a 2mm hole isn't trivial so they might have seen a significant drop in pressure, especially if they had to suspend reentry for a short while to work out some other problem. And as mentioned a hole could allow super-heated gas to enter the module; 2mm might grow to 20mm in a hurry.

  3. #123
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    Nothing has ever gone wrong with a spacecraft re-entering with a hole in it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?
    You forgot what happened to Challenger? Unless they can fix the hole with heat shielding material, it will not come down to earth in one piece.
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    You forgot what happened to Challenger? Unless they can fix the hole with heat shielding material, it will not come down to earth in one piece.
    That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.
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  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.
    Yes, and that was a dinner-plate size hole in a wing, not 2mm in a pressure vessel.
    It's a moot point, of course, as the damage was not in that module and the effect would depend on many other factors.
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  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.
    Sorry my old age showing. That was Columbia and if you have a weakness in the hull with those extreme high temperatures, you are looking for trouble.
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    "Russia to End U.S. Space Station Rides in April"

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...l-end-in-april

    Russia’s contract to supply Soyuz ferry rides for NASA astronauts to the International Space Station ends in April, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov told reporters on Friday.

    The expiration piles additional pressure on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to restore its own capability to shuttle U.S. crew members back and forth to the orbiting lab. The space agency is contracting with Boeing Co. and SpaceX to develop new vehicles to transport astronauts, but the work has been plagued by delays.
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  9. #129
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    Cause of leak was due to ‘TECHNOLOGICAL ERROR’ states Roscosmos boss Dmitry Rogozin.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...logical-error/

    Last week’s depressurization event at the International Space Station may have been caused by human error, not a micrometeoroid impact, Roscosmos boss Dmitry Rogozin told Russian media. The handling of the problem suggests a lack of proper oversight by the Russian space agency.
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  10. #130
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    https://phys.org/news/2018-09-russia...eliberate.html
    Russia says space station leak could be deliberate sabotage
    September 4, 2018

    Russia launched checks Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station last week could have been deliberate sabotage. Space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin said the hole detected Thursday in a Russian space craft docked at the orbiting station was caused by a drill and could have been done deliberately, either back on Earth or by astronauts in space. Astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure that was not life-threatening.
    "There were several attempts at drilling," Rogozin said late Monday in televised comments. He added that the drill appeared to have been held by a "wavering hand." "What is this: a production defect or some premeditated actions?" he asked. "We are checking the Earth version. But there is another version that we do not rule out: deliberate interference in space."

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    https://phys.org/news/2018-09-russia...eliberate.html
    Russia says space station leak could be deliberate sabotage
    September 4, 2018

    Russia launched checks Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station last week could have been deliberate sabotage. Space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin said the hole detected Thursday in a Russian space craft docked at the orbiting station was caused by a drill and could have been done deliberately, either back on Earth or by astronauts in space. Astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure that was not life-threatening.

    "There were several attempts at drilling," Rogozin said late Monday in televised comments. He added that the drill appeared to have been held by a "wavering hand." "What is this: a production defect or some premeditated actions?" he asked. "We are checking the Earth version. But there is another version that we do not rule out: deliberate interference in space."
    He's suggesting that an astronaut or cosmonaut sabotaged the orbital module on station? Seriously?

  12. #132
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    Picture attributed to NASA: https://www.engadget.com/2018/09/05/...smos-sabotage/
    Also at Washington Post with NASA-Shutterstock link
    Last edited by Squink; 2018-Sep-05 at 03:28 PM.

  13. #133
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    Now a push by both the US House and Senate yo extend the ISS ti 2030.

    https://spacenews.com/house-joins-se...to-extend-iss/

    A key House member announced Sept. 26 that he is introducing legislation that would extend operations of the International Space Station to 2030, weeks after senators sought a similar extension.
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  14. #134
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    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-russia...ely-space.html

    "Russian investigators looking into the origin of a hole that caused an oxygen leak on the International Space Station have said it was caused deliberately, the space agency chief said. A first commission had delivered its report, Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Russian space agency Roskosmos, said in televised remarks late Monday."

    Not going to comment further.

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    Happy birthday ISS

    cnet.com

    Twenty years ago, the most ambitious construction project in the history of the human race began with the launch of a Russian Proton rocket on Nov. 20, 1998. The uncrewed vehicle carried Zarya, a control module that would become the first piece of the International Space Station placed in orbit.

    The first crew, consisting of American astronaut and former Navy SEAL Bill Shepherd alongside Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko, would arrive to live in orbit just under two years later on Oct. 30, 2000.
    He points out the unprecedented hurdles involved, beginning with launching every module, nut, bolt and piece of framing required aboard a powerful rocket to a remote, empty and lethal location.

    "Performing just one of these voyages safely was a major challenge but the station's design called for 30 of them just to deliver the station's basic building blocks. Against the odds, all arrived on orbit safely and flawlessly where they fitted together correctly and precisely."
    I think we often forget how amazing an achievement it is.
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  16. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    cnet.com



    I think we often forget how amazing an achievement it is.
    There are many people who have never known a time there weren’t at least three people in orbit.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  17. #137
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    Off topic: the "mindset list" of what college freshmen have always or never experienced always amazes me. And makes me feel even more ancient than I wish were the case.
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  18. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There are many people who have never known a time there werenít at least three people in orbit.
    Even more people who have never known a time when there weren't at least two people in orbit.

    Wasn't the crew downsized to two are STS 107?

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    "NASA warns commercial crew delays create uncertainty in ISS operations"

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-warns-com...ss-operations/

    As NASA praises the increased amount of research being performed on the International Space Station, the station’s manager cautions that uncertainty about commercial crew vehicles may disrupt station operations in the year ahead.

    In an opening keynote at the ISS Research and Development Conference here July 30, Kirk Shireman, NASA’s ISS program manager, warned that the upcoming transition to commercial crew vehicles for transporting astronauts to and from the station may create “startup transients” that could disrupt the current smooth pace of operations there.

    “There are some great opportunities in our future, but also some challenges, some significant challenges,” Shireman said.
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    The Bigelow Aerospace expandable BEAM module's performance has been so good it's cleared to stay attached to ISS until 2028.

    Space News...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Even more people who have never known a time when there weren't at least two people in orbit.
    Just out of curiosity, when was the last time that there were fewer than two people in orbit, or for that matter, the most recent time when there was nobody in orbit?
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    I think your best bet in recent history would be somewhere in the period 16 june 2000- 31 october 2000. That's the period between the abandonment of MIR and the first long-term residents on ISS. I'm not sure there always was someone working on the ISS during that period. There were Shuttle and Soyuz flights, but I can imagine periods without people in orbit. It seems that there was a period between a shuttle construction flight landing on 24 october and the first ISS crew arrival on 31 october where nobody was in orbit, so on first glance I'd say 25-30 october 2000. Unless there was a Soyuz flight during that period which is highly unlikely since ISS crew 1 was a Soyuz launch.

    I wasn't conscious about it at the time, but apparently NASA staff did predict on that day there was "a decent chance october 30 2000 would be the last day ever without people in orbit".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Just out of curiosity, when was the last time that there were fewer than two people in orbit, or for that matter, the most recent time when there was nobody in orbit?
    wikipedia
    An international partnership consisting of Russia, the United States, Canada, Japan and the member states of the European Space Agency have jointly maintained a continuous human presence in space since 31 October 2000,
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  24. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    The Bigelow Aerospace expandable BEAM module's performance has been so good it's cleared to stay attached to ISS until 2028.

    Space News...
    Are they actually using it for anything?
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    Cargo stowage, according to that article.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    "NASA IG: Decide Future of the International Space Station Soon"

    http://www.parabolicarc.com/2019/11/...-station-soon/

    The sooner NASA can decide the future of the International Space Station (ISS), the easier it will be for the space agency to pursue its Artemis program to return astronauts to the moon by 2020, according to a new report from its Office of Inspector General (OIG).

    “Whether NASA decides to extend, increase commercialization of, or retire the ISS, the timing of each of these decisions has a cascading effect on the funding available to support space flight operations in low Earth orbit, ambitions for establishing a permanent presence on the Moon, and ultimately sending humans to Mars,” the report stated.

    The recommendation is included in a new OIG report that identified sustaining a human presence in low Earth orbit (LEO) as one of seven key management and performance challenges NASA faces.
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    It would be sad if the ISS were retired, a lot of wasted capital in the endeavor if that came to be. But time does change reality. I would vote, although my say so is miniscule, to keep both the Artemis and ISS. Perhaps make exploration of deep space a global project with all contributing $.

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    And don't the international partners get a say in it? Russia and Japan in particular?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And don't the international partners get a say in it? Russia and Japan in particular?
    In a sense, I think the answer is no, because if one of the major partners, especially the US or Russia, were to pull out and stop servicing their components, it would essentially cripple the ISS, so itís unlikely the others would to go on. In particular I think that NASA has provided about half the total funding, so it would be impossible to keep it operational without the US support.


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    The caveat though is that itís possible that China would join if NASA backed out.


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