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Thread: Pronunciation of Kuiper ?

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I just figured it was like Kai Yeves.

    ETA: Oh, and does "Kuiper" mean a guy who makes barrels? I love occupational surnames. Even though I don't have one.
    A Cooper is also a business person, but most like the barrel maker option, which is all I ever heard from school teachers. My name is pronounced Coop-er, not Coo-per, though I have said both. Coope is one way to say it, as a nickname. For some reason that's what they prefered to call my younger brother Gary....Gary Cooper.

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  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    ETA: Oh, and does "Kuiper" mean a guy who makes barrels?
    Yes, it does.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Let's just not get started on Oort.
    But since you did... rhymes with bored, not poured.
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  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    But since you did... rhymes with bored, not poured.
    Huh. But the way I speak, those words rhyme with each other. I’m not aware of a distinction, except for the “b” or “p” consonant sound starting off the words. Either way it is “ord.”

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    OK next: Betelgeuse?
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  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    But since you did... rhymes with bored, not poured.
    Kind of illustrates the problem. I pronounce these alike, with an /o/ vowel and a hard "r". In Received Pronunciation, they are also pronounced alike, with a dipthong /ɔə/, and the "r" not sounded. My old Pronouncing Dictionary of American English lists four pronunciations of "bored" and five of "poured", with four shared possibilities for the vowel+r.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #96
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    This is what I've been trying to explain to non-native English teachers/coaches for years, as they seem to think there is only 1 correct English pronunciation for each word, while even within British English there are variants and accents. Not even counting US English. And there is no valid argument why "Queen's English" would be more correct than a more Northern accent.

    I give lessons on pumps and I've heard "centrifugal" pronounced in so many vastly different ways that I've confused myself.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    OK next: Betelgeuse?
    Beetle Juice.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #98
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    I used to pronounce Kuiper as KOO ip er.

    Betelgeuse, I used to pronounce as BET el geese.
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  9. #99
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    Apparently the name is derived from Arabic and *******ized so much that how you pronounce "Betelgeuse" it is a free-for-all. That said, I don't know how to correctly pronounce the original Arabic name yad al-djoeza either. Not to mention the different pronounciations of "either".

    edit: and the word censored by the forum is not a bad word, according to Quora.
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  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    edit: and the word censored by the forum is not a bad word, according to Quora.
    And unless/until the forum software "changes its mind" we need to stay away from that word. Try "corrupted" next time.
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  11. #101
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    How do you pronounce "Cassegrain," as in "reflector"?

  12. #102
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    Cas-gren as in "Casper the Friendly ghost"-"Grenade" comes close. Certainly not as in the English "grain". "Cas" is stressed and has a flat "non-American" "a". The "gren" part is pronounced longer than in "grenade".
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    Thanks!

  14. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    How do you pronounce "Cassegrain," as in "reflector"?
    "Maksutov"!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Huh. But the way I speak, those words rhyme with each other. I’m not aware of a distinction, except for the “b” or “p” consonant sound starting off the words. Either way it is “ord.”
    Heh. Always good when a confused situation can be confused more! You're right. I misspelled the second word I wanted to use as an example. In my head was "poor" as in lacking money, and somewhere along the way to the keyboard it went wrong. And now I start to doubt that was a good example. I'll stick to computer languages.
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  16. #106
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    Computer languages aren't any better. Many programming languages have at least three variants for an IF statement.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Computer languages aren't any better. Many programming languages have at least three variants for an IF statement.
    I remember that the old CDC Cyber operating system switched a programming verb from ENQUIRE to INQUIRE sometime circa 1980. We were supporting both versions at that time.

  18. #108
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    Excel 64 bits has different CMD commands from Excel 32 bits. Excel has versions that need ";" between arguments and "," between arguments. Joy.
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  19. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Heh. Always good when a confused situation can be confused more! You're right. I misspelled the second word I wanted to use as an example. In my head was "poor" as in lacking money, and somewhere along the way to the keyboard it went wrong. And now I start to doubt that was a good example. I'll stick to computer languages.
    Well actually, I don’t know how common this is, but for me, pore, pour, and poor are all homonyms.
    As above, so below

  20. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Well actually, I don’t know how common this is, but for me, pore, pour, and poor are all homonyms.
    Same here (Raised in the US Northeast)
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  21. #111
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    Oh, and according to Wikipedia, Oort means edge (of town, for example). Appropriate.
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  22. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Same here (Raised in the US Northeast)
    US west and midwest here. When I read the words out loud, I seem to unconsciously put a little more emphasis on “pour” and stretch it slightly over the others, but I don’t think the subtle difference would be very noticeable to listeners.

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  23. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Oh, and according to Wikipedia, Oort means edge (of town, for example). Appropriate.
    For some reason, crossword puzzle creators very much like to use "ort" as the answer for "treat for a dog".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Oh, and according to Wikipedia, Oort means edge (of town, for example). Appropriate.
    I have no idea whether or not the words are in any way related, but in Dutch "oord" means "neighbourhood". Rarely used anymore, but for example in "verlated oord" ("abandoned place") it's still being used.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  25. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I have no idea whether or not the words are in any way related, but in Dutch "oord" means "neighbourhood". Rarely used anymore, but for example in "verlated oord" ("abandoned place") it's still being used.
    Rather mysteriously cognate with English ord, "the point of a weapon". (Presumably another word that's handy for crossword compilers.)

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #116
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    And somehow I type 2 words in Dutch in my long BAUT career, and manage to type one of them wrong. It should have been "verlaten oord".
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  27. #117
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    Not Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Computer languages aren't any better. Many programming languages have at least three variants for an IF statement.
    And that sort of thing is why the most commonly used computer language is profanity.

  28. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    And that sort of thing is why the most commonly used computer language is profanity.
    Which is why we'll never have true voice-activated programming.

    I've told my operating system and/or compiler to "shut up," "drop dead" or even to have intimate familiarity with itself so often that I fear I'd destroy it in that mode.

  29. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    And that sort of thing is why the most commonly used computer language is profanity.
    Here, here! Spot on!
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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