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Thread: Testudines skulls

  1. #1
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    Testudines skulls

    Today's Coast-to-Coast-AM science lesson: Testudines skulls are not space-alien skulls.

    Coast-to-Coast Listener Image: Odd Skull

    Skulls Unlimited: Testudines Catalog
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  2. #2
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    Yep, that's a sea turtle skull. Looks like the loggerhead we have in our wildlife collection.

    Being federally prohibited from possession in the U.S. without a permit, I hope those skulls are either in a museum or in some other country.

  3. #3
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    It could also be a replica. But it looks like it is on some sort of presentation shelf with labels and other bones around it, so it is probably in a museum or aquarium of some sort.

    It looks like a sea turtle, too, but looks nothing like popular presentations of extraterrestrials (note the extended nose and heavy curvature of the face around the eyes, popular images of ET's that I have seen tend to have much flatter faces compared to this).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBlackCat
    It could also be a replica. But it looks like it is on some sort of presentation shelf with labels and other bones around it, so it is probably in a museum or aquarium of some sort.
    Except the C2C site says that "Terry R," found it "while looking through a collection of bones." So unless "Terry" is scrounging through the back drawers of a zoological repository, the specimens are likely from elsewhere. If they were properly labeled, "Terry" would doubtless have stated this.

    They could be replicas, but I doubt it. Hardly anyone buys replicas at that level of quality except educators. On the other hand, less than a century ago we had full-fledged sea turtle canneries in the U.S., and it was very easy for almost anyone to procure pieces of the things. There are hundreds if not thousands of "contraband" sea turtle bones lying about in old attics, basements, sheds, etc... heck I got a sea turtle shell from a garage sale back in the early '80's.

  5. #5
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    They actually farm loggerheads in the Cayman Islands.

    What, exactly, are people who owned sea turtle parts prior to the ban supposed to do? Throw them out? I thought only trade in endangered species and products made from endangered species was illegal, people who procured such items before the bans went into effect were allowed to keep them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBlackCat
    They actually farm loggerheads in the Cayman Islands.
    Er, it's the Green's (Chelonia mydas) that are farmed. Loggerheads taste like butt. But you can't bring them back into the states, nor from anywhere else where it's legal (or illegal) to harvest. Commercial trade of sea turtle parts is internationally prohibited by CITES, anyhow.

    What, exactly, are people who owned sea turtle parts prior to the ban supposed to do? Throw them out? I thought only trade in endangered species and products made from endangered species was illegal, people who procured such items before the bans went into effect were allowed to keep them.
    This falls under the Endangered Species Act. As I recall, a private citizen is permitted to possess endangered species parts if:
    A. proof of antiquity (part has to be over 100 years old).
    B. part was possessed prior to 1973 (enactment of ESA)

    Supporting documentation is required to verify antiquity and date of possession, in order to be isssued an exemption permit. This is the "trick". One has to reasonably prove that he/she took possession of the part prior to 1973. Without such documentation, said part must be relinquished to USFWS.

    People in possession of non-permitted endangered species parts are also I believe, prohibited from "throwing them out." But that would be a horrible, horrible thing to do. They can always give them to me!
    Last edited by archman; 2005-Dec-05 at 10:44 AM.

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