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Thread: Reading computer screen is easy than reading books

  1. #1
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    Reading computer screen is easy than reading books

    There are contradictions in reading habits among many readers, some prefer for effective reading "use of books" some are habitual about reading on the screen, they do not wish to read the information in the book but they do screen reading, so is it a fashion, or it gives more joy to the eyes instead of looking into the books.

    Book reading is just a deminishing habit amongst the many readers and even in students, particularly engineering and medical students, they just turn on their computer and proceed for the information related with their syllabus, perhaps this is not a good habit to read only on screen, refering different books and read out is a great thing to do but most of the people do not do such thing.

    Many people or the aspirants of "creating thesis" are very much adhere with the electronic medium to chalk down their ideas, they just do the work "by collecting different information from the different sites and jot down their thesis, this is also not that good.

    I am not saying this is bad habit, but the students do this things to save their time in searching in the books and its writers, and its content, they just key the word into the search window and say..GO and find out the information, this is not a clever work they do so, butu they feal that they are doing "clever activity" for the complition of their assignments and thesis.

    may be your opinion differs, you may say that both habits are good one, or only book reading and taking short notes, this habit is best one likewise.

    sunil

  2. #2
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    How does this relate to your opinion that TV screens (which aren't hugely different, so far as I know, from monitors) cause all eye damage?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  3. #3
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    I find it difficult to read anything extensive on a screen. I'd much rather print it out.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  4. #4
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    they are making computer screens that are like paper and do not need power to keep the image going. possible electronic book of the future
    ................................

  5. #5
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    I actually find on-screen reading to be quite comfortable. Only with an LCD screen though. I can't wait for this new generation of electronic books.

  6. #6
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    I'm slightly nearsighted, so I'm relatively close to what I'm reading.
    As a result, I find the pixels tire my eyes out far faster than reading a book does.
    On the other hand, I habitually have several books on my palm pilot for reading in busses and other places where a book is less wieldy, so for me it's about fifty-fifty, though I'm rekindling my longslumbering loveaffair with public libraries, so I'd expect the ratio to slip in favour of books on paper.

    I am looking forward to Sony's electronic paper though, at least if they ever get their heads out of their backsides enough to stop alienating their customers with their DRM software.
    __________________________________________________
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    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
    A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. Mark Twain

  7. #7
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    Personally, I will always prefer books to any other medium. Of course, this is probably just irrational sentiment: I'm notoriously protective of my books. I've been known to say things along the lines of "Are you crazy? That's a book for crying out loud! You can't do that! Give it here!"

  8. #8
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    I personally hate reading something extensive on any kind of screen, especially a computer one, thats why unfortunately i dont read many of the long posts here on baut, just like the introduction post that suntrack2 made


    reading off of some sort of papoer is best for me. i perfer magazines and books (even though i dont like books)

  9. #9
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    For one thing, it's a heck of a lot easier to read a paperback while you're in the bath than the screen of a desktop computer.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  10. #10
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    I can't read for long periods on screen. I'm definatly a paper man. Dunno why that is really. Like knowledge seeker I get turned off from some long posts here on bout. But I will gladly print and read a new paper. preference I guess

  11. #11
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    I prefer paper and I think much of it is the way I recall things. If I have read something in a book, and want to read it again, I can open the book, and I somehow know approximately what page it was on. I recall the shapes around it, the colors, the illustrations, titles, the environment -- as if it were a physical location and I recall the previous journey and nearby landmarks. It usually takes but a couple seconds of page-flipping to find what I'm after.

    When I want to reread something I've seen on the computer, I'm at a loss. Where was it? Where do I start looking? Usually I have to recall some of the actual words and do a Google search. Sometimes that works. Often, I can't get the specific words back and it fails. I can't recreate the journey. I can't rediscover the location. It's frustrating.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  12. #12
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    I don't mind reading on line, but as Gillianren pointed out..it's tough to read in a hot bath. In the winter I like to read by the fire, nothing like snuggling up with a good book when you can't go outside. As least in my world, books will always have a place.

  13. #13
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    For me, I think that it's the fact that you can hold a book. Not so with electronic data.

  14. #14
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    I find it impossible to read more than a few pages on a computer screen; it just bugs my eyes.

  15. #15
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    where's the poll?

  16. #16
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    And then, to quote Giles: "Smell is the most powerful trigger to the memory there is. A certain flower or a whiff of smoke can bring up experiences long forgotten. Books smell... musty and rich. The knowledge gained from a computer is... it has no texture, no context. It's there and then it's gone. If it's to last, then the getting of knowledge should be tangible. It should be, um... smelly."
    __________________________________________________
    Reductionist and proud of it.

    Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn. Benjamin Franklin
    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
    A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. Mark Twain

  17. #17
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    I hate having to read off my screen for too long (even though I do), I'd much rather read off a book. And you can't lie down on a bed and read from a computer screen.

    with regards

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champion_Munch
    I hate having to read off my screen for too long (even though I do), I'd much rather read off a book. And you can't lie down on a bed and read from a computer screen.
    I do it all the time. I've read dozens of books from my IPAQ 4700 - the hardware is even getting a little worn I use it so much. It is pretty tough - I've accidentally dropped it on a (carpeted) floor a number of times, and it has gotten knocked around pretty well. I would prefer a little larger screen, though I can manage. It is interesting reading a page effectively lit from behind - there have been times when I was so intent on reading I hadn't realized the room had become completely dark, and then had to use the PDA as a flashlight.

    I love books too, but I read as much or more off the screen these days as from books. I do prefer larger LCD screens over smaller CRT monitors.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Supreme Canuck
    Personally, I will always prefer books to any other medium. Of course, this is probably just irrational sentiment: I'm notoriously protective of my books. I've been known to say things along the lines of "Are you crazy? That's a book for crying out loud! You can't do that! Give it here!"
    I'm the same way about books. I get fits if I see someone breaking a book's spine, I wouldn't consider reading a book in the tub (though I usually take showers), and I am very careful if I'm eating where I might get something on the book. (That's actually one advantage of the PDA - grease it up, wipe it off.)

    On the other hand, I have too many books, and have redone the shelving several times. I get tired of trying to find storage for them all and won't sell or give them away. While I prefer paper for technical books, I would be happy if I could get all novels in electronic format assuming that (a) there was no DRM, (b) it was in an open format (or preferably, available in multiple formats) that would be likely to be supported well into the future and (c) available at a reasonable cost (I'm not going to pay hardback prices). There is a bit of that available now, but not enough.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  20. #20
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    there have been times when I was so intent on reading I hadn't realized the room had become completely dark
    Happens to me all the time.

    with regards

  21. #21
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    thanks, for the replies here, Toseek quote: that they have a habit to take printouts of the material on the screen, they do not spend their time on "screen reading", infact this is also one of the good habit, one can do it simply.

    In my opinion the screen reading more than a hour may creat "eye cyndrome", this is a sort of one "visual disorder" which can develop when we seat on the screen frequently. I would like to say that book reading is best "early in the morning", late night reading supports to sleep better.

    Through reading supports to keep the data or the paragraph "well stored" in our memory, but it is possible to get the detail idea when we keep book in our hands for more than sufficient time, turning pages of books is not a brilliant idea, but what we have read out that is best supporting for our "reading confidence".

  22. #22
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    Add me to those who prefer books to computer screen...

    Quote Originally Posted by suntrack2
    ...late night reading supports to sleep better.
    I know it's time to go to sleep, when I find I'm reading with my eyes closed.

    ...what we have read out that is best supporting for our "reading confidence".
    Sorry, but you're going to have to explain what you mean by this...
    The facts, gentlemen, and nothing but the facts, for careful eyes are narrowly watching. Isaac Asimov

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.A.F.
    I know it's time to go to sleep, when I find I'm reading with my eyes closed.
    Ever notice how mediocre books tend to get sooo much better when you do it that way?
    "Words that make questions may not be questions at all."
    - Neil deGrasse Tyson, answering loaded question in ten words or less
    at a 2010 talk MCed by Stephen Colbert.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champion_Munch
    I hate having to read off my screen for too long (even though I do), I'd much rather read off a book. And you can't lie down on a bed and read from a computer screen.

    with regards
    I can; my computer's next to my bed. (The whole chronic pain thing; we planned it that way.) But I can't curl up with it, which is just as important.

    Add me to those who can't bear to see a book's spine broken--but I'm not as twitchy about it as my neighbor, the librarian. I always half-expect her to snatch the book out of the person's hands, hit them, and start lecturing. (She's right; it does make the pages fall out faster.)

    In fact, I was the only person in most of my classes who never highlighted their books, and I certainly never dogear them. My bookmarks are generally slips of paper that I need somewhere else; if they're in my book, I can find them easier. I know my neighbor wanted to charge people for her time if they returned heavily dog-eared books to the library, causing her to have to stand there for as long as twenty minutes unfolding all the corners.

    And, yes, one of her bosses did encounter the infamous item of library legend, the bacon bookmark.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren
    In fact, I was the only person in most of my classes who never highlighted their books, and I certainly never dogear them. My bookmarks are generally slips of paper that I need somewhere else; if they're in my book, I can find them easier.
    Heh. I hated the practice of highlighting a book, and never dog-eared them. I sometimes used bookmarks, but if a book had a decent index, that was rarely necessary. Usually, I'll remember something or I won't, there isn't much middle ground, and highlighting just wastes time I could be using to better study and remember the text.

    These days, I like Postit tape flags. They're obvious and they can be easily removed without damage (as long as you don't leave them too long).


    And, yes, one of her bosses did encounter the infamous item of library legend, the bacon bookmark.
    That would not have even occurred to me. Yeesh.

    I rarely lend out my books. There just aren't many people that are as careful with them. I get annoyed when I lend out a book I've kept in good shape and get a mangled mess back. It just isn't worth it.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  26. #26
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    I'd give the edge to books.

    No batteries or electricity required*, easy to carry around and no fear of your site going down for days at a time.

    *Naturally you need light to see what your reading, but if the electricty goes out, you can still read by candlelight. Of course, you can stare at your monitor by candlelight, but that gets boring.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metricyard
    I'd give the edge to books.

    No batteries or electricity required*, easy to carry around and no fear of your site going down for days at a time.

    *Naturally you need light to see what your reading, but if the electricty goes out, you can still read by candlelight. Of course, you can stare at your monitor by candlelight, but that gets boring.
    And during the day, you don't even need candles.

    I do loan out books--to fellow bibliophiles. I don't need to worry about Heather destroying one of my books--she's the librarian--or my best friend who's just shy of a Master's in Creative Nonfiction. Still, there are certain books that don't leave the apartment even in my own hands--that's the signed ones, generally; the last one to leave the apartment was my copy of Good Omens, and that was to get the Neil Gaiman signature to go with the Terry Pratchett one.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  28. #28
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    My vote: books.

    Take an 8 1/2 X 11 book. Open it up, you essentially have a 17x11 piece of paper. At an OK resolution of 200 dpi, you would need a monitor of 3400x2200 pixels to recreate it (Mainly so you can see everything at once)

    Oh; and everything else that people said about books.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher
    Take an 8 1/2 X 11 book. Open it up, you essentially have a 17x11 piece of paper. At an OK resolution of 200 dpi, you would need a monitor of 3400x2200 pixels to recreate it (Mainly so you can see everything at once)
    But why do you need all that? For a text book with illustrations or equations, sure, I can see the argument. For a novel or story collection, though, I prefer paperbacks: Easier to handle and cheaper. I have no problem adapting to reading a book on my PDA. It has a touch control, tap it, and the text moves forward or backwards. It doesn't take long to adapt, before long you don't really think about reading on a PDA.

    You also don't need that much screen resolution, though Cleartype and equivalents make a real difference. It sure helps on my PDA. And you can change the size of the text, adjust it smaller or large for your personal comfort level.


    Oh; and everything else that people said about books.
    Books are okay when it comes to display. But they are hard to search, bulky and can't be backed up. I have the equivalent of a box of books on a chip the size of a postage stamp and there is plenty of room for more. I have the same books on my main computer.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  30. #30
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    I prefer paper. When I read on a screen I have to consciously stop myelf from lapsing into "scanning" after the first few sentences.

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