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Thread: Interesting extrasolar planet discoveries

  1. #61
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    How long will it be these discoveries get covered by science news websites such as ScienceDaily and LiveScience?

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    New discoveries:
    The 2002 record of 34 discoveries is now broken.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  3. #63
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    Hurrah! To secure that record, there are more discoveries to be announced really soon (including two gravitational lensing planets, in the same system)!

    I'm not sure if we can say that we're crossing the border when discovering planets becomes a flood as predicted, but the signs suggest so. The major problem among the extrasolar planet science is not only the lack of money (surprise), but also the lack of scientists, instruments, and time. There are so many systems that most systems can't be studied in enough detail.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by t@nn View Post
    How long will it be these discoveries get covered by science news websites such as ScienceDaily and LiveScience?
    Don't hold your breath. Nowadays only the most interesting extrasolar planet discoveries are noticed. Understandably so, as there are so many "ordinary" planets found.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    Don't hold your breath. Nowadays only the most interesting extrasolar planet discoveries are noticed. Understandably so, as there are so many "ordinary" planets found.
    What other websites will be updated with the information? I'm assuming that the extrasolar encyclopedia will be one of them.

  6. #66
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    Yes, and the discoverers' websites are usually up-to-date. You might find some new discoveries at the arXiv.org preprint service. Otherwise, you just have to wait.

  7. #67
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    Some planets announced in the Santorini conference by the Geneva team have been released to public:

    *HD 43691 b and HD 132406 b, both orbit metal rich stars
    *HD 171028 b, a planet around a metal-poor star

  8. #68
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    The existence of a planet around a star and the star's metallicity is strongly correlated--but only in the case of low-mass stars. A new study suggests that no such correlation exist among giant stars. It is possible that the observed metallicity is not intrinsic, but pollution from protoplanetary disks. When a star expands into a giant, its atmosphere becomes better mixed and the extra metals disappear.

  9. #69
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    A 3-year infrared search of extrasolar planets resulted in zero detections suggesting that super-massive Jovian planets are rare in distant orbits.

  10. #70
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    Conclusive evidence of water vapor in an extrasolar planet's atmosphere (see this thread).

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    A 3-year infrared search of extrasolar planets resulted in zero detections suggesting that super-massive Jovian planets are rare in distant orbits.
    That's not good. It might mean that habitable earth-type planets in earth orbits are equally rare.

  12. #72
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    Not necessarily. The paper says that almost certainly less than 20% of stars have supermassive Jovians (> 4 Mj) in large orbital distances (20-100 AU).

    Which is hardly surprising. In our Solar System, the existence of outer ice giants become problematic if we don't take migration into account. It is hard to see how a far more massive supergiant could form at these distances, except if it is a some sort of sub-brown dwarf instead.

    So, no bad news except that it will take longer until new planets can be found using infrared imaging.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    Not necessarily. The paper says that almost certainly less than 20% of stars have supermassive Jovians (> 4 Mj) in large orbital distances (20-100 AU).

    Which is hardly surprising. In our Solar System, the existence of outer ice giants become problematic if we don't take migration into account. It is hard to see how a far more massive supergiant could form at these distances, except if it is a some sort of sub-brown dwarf instead.

    So, no bad news except that it will take longer until new planets can be found using infrared imaging.
    Oh, okay. I was thinking it was saying that Jupiter type planets in Jupiter type orbits (around 5 au) are rare.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    Which is hardly surprising. In our Solar System, the existence of outer ice giants become problematic if we don't take migration into account.
    Is migration of large planets and subsequent merging with inner planets a likely scenario? Perhaps not as I understand they have very weak densities, though I don't know what percent.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  15. #75
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  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Is migration of large planets and subsequent merging with inner planets a likely scenario? Perhaps not as I understand they have very weak densities, though I don't know what percent.
    http://www.astronomy.com/asy/default.aspx?c=a&id=5039
    Even lifebearing planets may exist in systems with Hot Jupiters...

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    http://www.astronomy.com/asy/default.aspx?c=a&id=5039
    Even lifebearing planets may exist in systems with Hot Jupiters...
    Thanks. They say Earth-like planets form in the wake of migrating gigantic planets. This seems odd.

    Quote Originally Posted by article
    Watercovered, Earth-like planets form in the wake of the giant planets' migration. "Earth-like planets around nearby stars could be more common than we thought," said Sean Raymond, a NASA postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado and co-lead author of the study.
    What kind of wake are they suppose to leave? Are they not clearing out a path? [Aren't they planets? ]
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    old news there are some already discovered...
    All those planets orbit closer than Jupiter and most of them have high eccentricities. A Jovian planet at a distance of our asteroid belt would prevent an Earth-like planet from forming.

    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    http://www.extrasolar.net/planettour...al&PlanetId=73 that planet was Jupiterlike when it's star was on the main sequence, now it has more Marslike climate but enough to thaw ice on it's moons...
    Upsilon Andromedae is still a main sequence star...

    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    And there is Neptune-like (in climate, not mass) planet inferred in 40 Eri;
    http://www.extrasolar.net/planettour...l&PlanetId=236
    40 Eridani = Omicron2 Eridani = Keid = the parent star of Vulcanus. You mean Epsilon Eridani.

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Thanks. They say Earth-like planets form in the wake of migrating gigantic planets. This seems odd.
    Any large objects already formed would be slingshotted by the incoming gas giant, but gas is transferred more gently from inside the planet's orbit to outside; at the same time the planet loses its orbital energy and falls towards the star. That's the way they migrate.

    Terrestrial planets can form after the planet has passed by.

    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    What kind of wake are they suppose to leave? Are they not clearing out a path?
    See the latest systemic blog entry.

  20. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    That almost looks like a galaxy model, too. I would have guessed some sort of scale emergent properties to alter things. Of course, my understanding of it is limited, but I will study it. If you have any references depicting such things, I would enjoy them.

    Thanks.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  21. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    That almost looks like a galaxy model, too. I would have guessed some sort of scale emergent properties to alter things.
    Well, both are density waves. You can create one by rotating water in a bucket.

  22. #82
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    I prefer powdery cream on top of my swirling coffee?
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  23. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    All those planets orbit closer than Jupiter and most of them have high eccentricities. A Jovian planet at a distance of our asteroid belt would prevent an Earth-like planet from forming.



    Upsilon Andromedae is still a main sequence star...



    40 Eridani = Omicron2 Eridani = Keid = the parent star of Vulcanus. You mean Epsilon Eridani.
    Ups And is a subgiant, class IV , not H burning and definitely not main sequence.
    All these planets revolve primarily around late G and K stars which have HZs somewhere between orbit of Venus and Mercury.

  24. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu View Post
    Well, both are density waves. You can create one by rotating water in a bucket.
    How about an actual image announced yesterday (big bucket).
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  25. #85
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    http://www.extrasolar.net/planettour...l&PlanetId=253
    Read;"

    HD 70642 b is a good analogue for Jupiter, having similar mass, orbital distance, and circular orbit. These factors increase the chances that this system may harbor Earth-like planets closer to the star."

    RLY OL NWS

  26. #86
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GJ_317
    Two good Jupiters also, both are in the right place to serve as "anti-cometary-defense system" for inner planets.

  27. #87
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    http://www.extrasolar.net/planettour...l&PlanetId=192
    ...
    I listed it before but as I can see you are so ignorant and "sceptical" that you "debunk" it with empty words that all these planets have asteroid belt like orbits...
    http://scienceblogs.com/catdynamics/...r_unveiled.php
    That newly discovered planet is not FIRST exo-Jupiter.
    Right?

    http://exoplanet.eu/star.php?st=HD+132406
    This planet might have hhabitable moons, it is massive and temperature is relatively good there.

  28. #88
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    36 for the year and counting.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  29. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    I listed it before but as I can see you are so ignorant and "sceptical" that you "debunk" it with empty words that all these planets have asteroid belt like orbits...
    I don't follow. Who are you calling ignorant?

    Do you think that makes your words more persuasive?
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  30. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    Ups And is a subgiant, class IV , not H burning and definitely not main sequence.
    Then why SIMBAD, the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia, and even the Extrasolar Visions list it as F8 V? Being a late F star with the absolute magnitude of ~4 it most certainly is still a main sequence star.

    Quote Originally Posted by m1omg View Post
    All these planets revolve primarily around late G and K stars which have HZs somewhere between orbit of Venus and Mercury.
    Still, none of them resemble Jupiter as much as HD 154345 b. The planets in 47 UMa system come close, but you can't claim that 14 Her b or Epsilon Eri b are true Jupiter analogs.

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