Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: The devastation due to tsunami on moon may count lower if the moon was habitable

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,068

    The devastation due to tsunami on moon may count lower if the moon was habitable

    This is I am saying. If the moon was habitable and having some sea's on it, and if there the tsunami erupt in the sea the devastation may be count on the lower level but as far as tides are concern they could irrupt on great levels, but due to a lesser gravitational pressure on the tides the speed of falling tide can count on the lower level! in all the total things caught in the tides.

    The tsunami tide X 1/6 in its weight, so the aggregate weight of the raised tide may minimize and hence the devastation shall be lower in such case.

    We know that moon has no sea's, not habitable etc.

    I am saying this one "for example".

    What corner of thought would you like to give in this case.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tsunami on moon.jpg 
Views:	174 
Size:	51.8 KB 
ID:	7942  
    Last edited by suntrack2; 2008-May-25 at 06:34 AM. Reason: one line is omiting from reference...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    N.E.Ohio
    Posts
    22,006
    Quote Originally Posted by suntrack2 View Post
    If the moon was habitable and having some sea's on it, and if there the tsunami erupt in the sea
    That's a real big if.

    But; tsunamis are a problem in any environment anyway. As far as the tides are concerned, they are continuous, so any civilization will learn to live with it. (Bay of Fundy as an example)

    And, add in the fact that there is a 2 week period for a tide to go in or out. Lot's of time there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,545
    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    But; tsunamis are a problem in any environment anyway. As far as the tides are concerned, they are continuous, so any civilization will learn to live with it. (Bay of Fundy as an example)
    Since the moon is fairly dead, the tsunamis might be much smaller. There are earthquakes, though, and they might cause earthslides that trigger larger tsunamis. Assuming that the seas had built up such structures, of course.
    And, add in the fact that there is a 2 week period for a tide to go in or out. Lot's of time there.
    Because the earth has greater mass than the moon, the tides will be larger by that factor of what 81? But the moon being smaller radius makes the tides smaller by that factor, of 4. And since the moon is tide-locked, there is very little in the shift that would cause tides, except for that which would be associated with libration.

    Of course, tsunamis are not tidal waves, really.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    N.E.Ohio
    Posts
    22,006
    Quote Originally Posted by hhEb09'1 View Post
    And since the moon is tide-locked, there is very little in the shift that would cause tides, except for that which would be associated with libration.
    Ouch, I can't believe I got that wrong... Holiday weekend thinking, I imagine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    8,774
    On a hypothetical geologically active planet with the gravity of the Moon [think of an earth-sized less dense planet] containing an ocean, the water column would weight less. So a tsunami [which is caused by the uplift of the ocean floor] could be potentially bigger, methinks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,545
    Quote Originally Posted by Argos View Post
    On a hypothetical geologically active planet with the gravity of the Moon [think of an earth-sized less dense planet] containing an ocean, the water column would weight less. So a tsunami [which is caused by the uplift of the ocean floor] could be potentially bigger, methinks.
    I don't think it's so much as weight, as displacement. But that displacement might be affected by the angle of repose, say, of submarine shelves. And it could go either way then.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    8,774
    But wouldnŽt the weight of the water exert a pressure on the floor, limiting the upward displacement?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    14,315
    Wave velocity is a function of the fluid, the wavelength, and the gravitational pull. Amplitude in a deep see is dependant on simply the force of the wave and the gravitational pull.

    The greater the gravitational pull, the smaller the amplitude but the faster the velocity of the wave.

    Thus, waves on the moon would have a greater amplitude, but move much slower.

    As for tides, the only tide it would experience would be due to the sun, but with a rotation of once per 28 days, the tides wouldn't exactly occur very rapidly... But as someone noted, because of the moon's lesser gravity, the difference between low and high tide would be significantly larger.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,021
    The tides on the moon would be analogous to the spring and neap tides on Earth. In other words they would occur twice a month, with highs when the earth and sun's gravity pull in line, and minima when earth and sun's gravity pull at right angles.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,545
    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    But as someone noted, because of the moon's lesser gravity, the difference between low and high tide would be significantly larger.
    The solar tide, at earth/moon distance is less than a third that of the spring tide. Since the moon is a quarter of the size of the earth, the tide would be reduced by a factor of four. Lunar gravity is a sixth. Back of the envelope, that would be about 1/3 x 1/4 x 6, or half. About 50 cm, top to bottom.
    Quote Originally Posted by MAPNUT View Post
    The tides on the moon would be analogous to the spring and neap tides on Earth. In other words they would occur twice a month, with highs when the earth and sun's gravity pull in line, and minima when earth and sun's gravity pull at right angles.
    The earth's pull results in an almost permanent deformation, except for libration, meaning no noticeable tide contribution.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    8,774
    Quote Originally Posted by Argos View Post
    But wouldnŽt the weight of the water exert a pressure on the floor, limiting the upward displacement?
    Well, this question was made in earnest, reflecting my ignorance, not irony. IŽd like to know if the weight of the ocean above the plaque is negligible, when it comes to [limiting] the upward displacement of the ocean floor. IŽd like somebody to answer [hhEb09'1 ?], since IŽm having a hard time trying to find it [maybe because the answer is "yes, it is negligible"].

    IŽm finding though, that tsunamis can be generated by a downward displacement too.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,068
    thanks argos and other friends here in this topic for the replies, all thoughts are precious and possitive and can be apply, "Argos your last line is important "tsunamis can be generated by a downward displacement". One of my friend said last time, that tsunamis can be generated 1. due to the addition of the mass into the water, 2. due to the disturbance in the plates, 3. due to a particular location fault at a specific place in the underwater of the sea, 4. due to a horrible tycoon in the sea. in replying against his possibilities, only I could do "my mouth with a great 'O".

Similar Threads

  1. The Moon, Engines And Lower Gravity
    By BigDon in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2008-Nov-24, 11:48 PM
  2. The Moon to be Higher and Lower in 2006
    By ToSeek in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2006-Mar-19, 08:41 AM
  3. The Latest Moon Count
    By Crimson in forum Astronomy
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 2005-Jun-17, 11:40 AM
  4. Lower Moon November 23, 2004
    By astronomy2004 in forum Astrophotography
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2004-Nov-28, 12:11 PM
  5. Jupiter Moon Count Jumps again!
    By skeptED56 in forum Astronomy
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 2003-Apr-23, 03:32 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •