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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #3781
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    I do, and I still call people Stirling Moss if they drive quickly and drummers are 'Cozy'
    I understand one of those references!

    *looks up "Cozy drummer"*

    Okay, now make that two. (I don't really know much about the history of popular music...)

  2. #3782
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    I have just finished the 19th book in the "Foreigner" series by C J Cherry. ( Another purchase from "Book Depository") Enjoyable as always, but it must be admitted that the plot-line does not "race ahead" with battles and adventures on every page. Also, the world building is so detailed that I doubt any new reader could pick up the latter novels and really enjoy them.

  3. #3783
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    Michael Shermer's Why People Believe Weird Things. A little old, but still relevant. (~20 years after publication seems to be the window for when popular nonfiction books end up on the dollar cart at used bookstores and can be bought cheaply.)

  4. #3784
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    Really? Twenty years? Already?

    You've made a happy man very old.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  5. #3785
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Really? Twenty years? Already?

    You've made a happy man very old.

    Grant Hutchison
    Well, this is the 1997 edition, I don't know if there were later editions that added more material.

  6. #3786
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Well, this is the 1997 edition, I don't know if there were later editions that added more material.
    That may well be, but it is the 1997 edition I own.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  7. #3787
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    The Lost Traveller: A Motorcycle Grail Quest Epic and Science Fiction Western (1976) by Steve Wilson. Hell's Angels drive across a post-apocalyptic USA to rescue a scientist who has the secret of farming the radioactive badlands. As well as the usual sex-and-violence and strange honour code that characterized the short-lived "Hell's Angel" narrative genre of the 70s, this one has science fiction, Celtic and Native American mythology, and a Vision Quest, too.

    Oh. And it has a hero who does not know his father and believes him dead, who fights his father in a vision and then discovers his own face where his father's should be, and who unknowingly kills his father during a fight in which his hand is injured, only coming to understand what he has done from his father's dying words. Remind you of anything? (If so, note the publication date.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  8. #3788
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    Does he find his long lost sister in the sequel?

    "Parachutes and petticoats" by Brigitte Friang, the English translation of her memoir "Les Fleurs du Ciel". She was in the Maquis, shot, captured, tortured, sent to Ravensbrück, freed by the Red Army, became a journalist, went to Indo-China, bullied the army into putting her through para training, had several combat drops including into Dien Bien Phu. Died peacefully in her bed aged 87.

  9. #3789
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    The Torture Report: A Graphic Representation, by Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon. An interesting way of getting the information. A bit hampered by the difficulty of illustrating the contents without being too graphic yet accurately portraying the information contained.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  10. #3790
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    Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, the autobiography of former astronaut Scott Kelly about his 340-day stay on the ISS. I've read about one-third of the book and it's interesting on several levels; as a biography of someone who chose to be an astronaut after reading The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe, as a memoir about the challenge of living in space for almost a contiguous year, and a critical view of the NASA way of getting things done.

  11. #3791
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    Street without joy by Bernard Fall.

  12. #3792
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    Finished Ken Follett's 900+ page Pillars of the Earth. Well, I finished, so it must have been pretty good. Yes, I enjoyed it. Now started on his World Without End. This one's 1000+ pages! Sheesh!
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  13. #3793
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    And there's a third in the Kingsbridge series, A column of Fire. Another doorstop.

  14. #3794
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    I'm on the hold list for that one! As it is, I'm about to start Uncommon Type, by Tom Hanks, typewriter aficionado.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  15. #3795
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    Mike Pitts' Digging for Richard III: The Search for the Lost King. A surprisingly recent book to end up on the bookstore dollar cart, but I'm glad it ended up there so I could pick it up. I really like it as a popular archaeology book that not only describes archaeological methods and techniques really well but also talks a lot about the public relations and governmental pressures involved in an excavation and the different meanings that the archaeological past can have for people in the modern day.

  16. #3796
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    Timothy Caulfield's Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything? (Spoiler alert: Yes.)
    As well as debunking the nutritional idiocy of Paltrow and her peers, it's actually an interesting investigation into how "celebrity culture" happened to us, as well as a discussion of the adverse effects of the "You can do anything, if you only want it enough and work hard enough" myth.
    Its target audience is perhaps all those parents who are ploughing thousands and thousands of dollars into their children's aspirations to be rock/film/sports stars. As one of Caulfield's interviewees points out, if you gambled that much money any other way, you'd be considered to have a problem; but because it's about ambition and dreams that makes it OK.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  17. #3797
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Finished Ken Follett's 900+ page Pillars of the Earth. Well, I finished, so it must have been pretty good. Yes, I enjoyed it. Now started on his World Without End. This one's 1000+ pages! Sheesh!
    I had mixed feelings about that one. I read it because I'd been reading Brother Cadfael, set in the same era, but found some of the sex scenes a bit off-putting.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #3798
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    Happy Odyssey by Adrian Carton de Wiart, a memoir that makes me dislike him more the more I read.

  19. #3799
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    I finished Children of Facundo this week and started Socrates Buddha Confucius Jesus. I have next week off, so I am also reading H. M. Hoover's The Delikon.
    Solfe

  20. #3800
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    How Not to Hate Your Husband After Kids, by Jancee Dunn--which I may look for in an audio version so Graham and I could discuss it. I'm not much for self-help books generally and checked this one out because of the title, but it's got some good information in it and is funny.

    Crash Override, by Zoe Quinn. (Perhaps ironically only available from my library as an e-book.) Her perspective on GamerGate, what happened to her, why it happens, and what can be done about it.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  21. #3801
    Haven't really bee reading anything lately but the skeptics guide folks have wrote a book, not available until fall but can't wait. It is updated their version of Demon Haunted World.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  22. #3802
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    The latest in a long series of sea stories by Julian Stockwin. I almost didn't purchase it because the last one was dreadful. This one was going considerably better right up until he described an action taking place with the full moon to the north, in the Russian Arctic. Mr. Stockwin needs to brush up on basic astronomy.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #3803
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The latest in a long series of sea stories by Julian Stockwin. I almost didn't purchase it because the last one was dreadful. This one was going considerably better right up until he described an action taking place with the full moon to the north, in the Russian Arctic. Mr. Stockwin needs to brush up on basic astronomy.
    That'll work, though, unless there are other disqualifying conditions you haven't mentioned.
    The full moon in winter traces roughly the same path as the sun in summer - so any place you can have a midnight sun in the north, you can have a full moon in the north six months later. In fact, because the moon can stray five degrees north of the ecliptic, the criteria for a northerly full moon are a little more relaxed - you can have a northerly full moon even if you're a little south of the Arctic Circle, and if you're close to the pole you can have the sun and full moon above the horizon at the same time near the equinoxes.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  24. #3804
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    That'll work, though, unless there are other disqualifying conditions you haven't mentioned.
    The full moon in winter traces roughly the same path as the sun in summer - so any place you can have a midnight sun in the north, you can have a full moon in the north six months later. In fact, because the moon can stray five degrees north of the ecliptic, the criteria for a northerly full moon are a little more relaxed - you can have a northerly full moon even if you're a little south of the Arctic Circle, and if you're close to the pole you can have the sun and full moon above the horizon at the same time near the equinoxes.

    Grant Hutchison
    When we flew to China to adopt our first child, our flight took us up over the arctic. I have a fairly nice photo I took right about noon local time of the full moon, to the north, in a dark sky.

    So, yes, nothing inherently wrong with that.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  25. #3805
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    Hmm, hadn't thought of that. But it's set in the spring, I think. Now that I think of it, how come he's able to sail to Arkangelsk but Helsinki is still frozen in later on?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #3806
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    Ok, a bit of research: The incident with the moon is based on a British attack on Kildin Island in June of 1809. Latitude 69N.

    Stockwin, however, places this incident at least several weeks prior to the surrender of Sveaborg Fortress in May of 1808. So I just don't know.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #3807
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    Finally got Ken Follett's A Column of Fire and am having similar "Okay, but . . . " feelings. Overall, I'm enjoying it quite a lot. However, there's a major character who's fictional despite the fact that her role in the story is Best Friend Of Mary Queen Of Scots. Like, there were historical figures he could have used there, and I assume he didn't because of how he wanted to play with the story, but still.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  28. #3808
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Finally got Ken Follett's A Column of Fire and am having similar "Okay, but . . . " feelings. Overall, I'm enjoying it quite a lot. However, there's a major character who's fictional despite the fact that her role in the story is Best Friend Of Mary Queen Of Scots. Like, there were historical figures he could have used there, and I assume he didn't because of how he wanted to play with the story, but still.
    I always worry about this in my own writing that involves both real and fictional people and fictional people with real accomplishments. For instance, if I have an Olympic athlete who's supposed to have won a silver medal in such-and-such event at the 200X Olympics, will it throw people out of the story when they can very easily look up who DID win the silver medal in that event at those Games and see that it wasn't my character?

    -

    On the subject of this thread, I finished Douglas Smith and Gary Ferguson's Decade of the Wolf: Returning the Wild to Yellowstone earlier this week and enjoyed it. Even though the wolves they studied were known by numbers rather than names, their individual personalities and stories really shone through and I didn't really get any two confused. And of course now I want to visit Yellowstone National Park even more than before because it sounds like a really stunning place.

  29. #3809
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I always worry about this in my own writing that involves both real and fictional people and fictional people with real accomplishments. For instance, if I have an Olympic athlete who's supposed to have won a silver medal in such-and-such event at the 200X Olympics, will it throw people out of the story when they can very easily look up who DID win the silver medal in that event at those Games and see that it wasn't my character?

    -

    On the subject of this thread, I finished Douglas Smith and Gary Ferguson's Decade of the Wolf: Returning the Wild to Yellowstone earlier this week and enjoyed it. Even though the wolves they studied were known by numbers rather than names, their individual personalities and stories really shone through and I didn't really get any two confused. And of course now I want to visit Yellowstone National Park even more than before because it sounds like a really stunning place.
    Yellowstone has been part of my life forever. Best place in the world, except for rather too many people.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #3810
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Ok, a bit of research: The incident with the moon is based on a British attack on Kildin Island in June of 1809. Latitude 69N.

    Stockwin, however, places this incident at least several weeks prior to the surrender of Sveaborg Fortress in May of 1808. So I just don't know.
    The winter of 1808-09 was one of the coldest on record, the Russians marched an army over the ice across the Gulf of Bothnia in March 1809. I'm struggling to see circumstances where Helsinki was icebound and Archangel wasn't.

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