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Thread: Kp index hit 9

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Kp index hit 9

    Kp index just hit 9, huge geomagnetic storm. I don't remember this happening more than once or twice before in recent years.

    I wonder if this will accelerate the motion of the earth's magnetic pole?
    http://www.geolab.nrcan.gc.ca/geomag...vt_nmp_e.shtml

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    34
    What's nice is that it jumped from 4 straight to 9. NOAA's statistics/definition says G5 (K9) is hit 3 times per the 11 year cycle on average. They give 0841 UTC as the time the K-index 9 was reached, altough they've been giving alerts for lower K-index since then. SpaceWeather had a report "The coronal mass ejection described below has reached Earth (at approximately 0630 UT on Oct. 29th) and triggered a strong geomagnetic storm. This storm is ongoing! Red and green Northern Lights have been spotted as far south as Bishop, California." for a while now.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2001
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    We use magnetic torquers to change the attitude of spacecraft in low earth orbit. I wonder if a big storm could torque the earth to change the angle to the ecliptic? This is what is causing warming of the poles.
    http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/eischao.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    284
    Quote Originally Posted by Donwulff
    What's nice is that it jumped from 4 straight to 9.
    Actually thats not true. I receive the space weather alerts in my inbox at work, and it went up the scale. From yesterday morning when this first "exploded", I have received 36 alerts. These range from warnings about radio emissions to K-index and A-index levels. At 3:40 AM, EST the alert for k-index of 9 came in. Over the next few hours it was downgraded to a 6, then just a few minutes ago back to a 7. Until it gets closer they won't know for sure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    34
    Well, that's a matter of definition. Any analog signal will reach all the values between starting and ending value, so naturally the actual storminess level didn't jump from 4 to 9 at once. But the planetary K-index usually considered is a 3 hour average, and that one did jump from 4 to 9 even though momentary K-indexes had all values in between.

    From http://www.sec.noaa.gov/info/Kindex.html, "At SEC, we monitor the preliminary values of the K-index, minute by minute, and we notify our rapid alert customers when we exceed critical thresholds of 6, 7, and 8. The final real-time K-index is determined after the end of prescribed three hourly intervals (0000-0300, 0300-0600, ..., 2100-2400) and is used on our announcements and appears on our web site. The maximum positive and negative deviations during the 3-hour period are added together to determine the total maximum fluctuation. These maximum deviations may occur anytime during the 3-hour period."

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