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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1081
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Sorry! "CA" is the shorthand commonly used in the woodworking forums I frequent. Curiously, we don't shorten contact adhesive, aka contact cement, except perhaps to use the brand name of whatever we're using, such as Weldwood. For PVA glues, the most widely used here is the Titebond brand with several formulations available. The one I use most is commonly abbreviated in the forums as TBIII, for Titebond III.



    Yep, it's primarily a filler and a colorant. I considered epoxy but these weren't clean cracks. They had a lot of separated fibers bridging the gaps and I had concern that the expoxy wouldn't penetrate thoroughly. While it isn't practical for large voids, the CA/filler method is much quicker for small gaps. Just pack the grounds in, flood it with CA, spray it with activator, and I'm scraping it smooth in a matter of seconds. Even though it takes two or more applications, it's still faster than my expoxy's 2-hour cure time. On the completely subjective side, I think the coffee grounds look more organic than most epoxy fills. The color is certainly very wood-like. I've even been toying with the idea of using alternatives like ground coconut or cocao shells.
    Yes I can see That working, water spray would set off the CA by the way. At least that’s what I use in similar situations on plastics. Metals not so good with CA with time. But otherwise a permanent fix. Removers used to have sticks of coloured wax for when they scratched furniture! Also PU model makers, very effective for quick repair. I think the wax was filled to make it brittle, anyway a quick rub filled a scratch.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #1082
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Yes I can see That working, water spray would set off the CA by the way.
    Water does work but too much can weaken the bond and creating fogginess or foaming. If you like using water, you can try adding a sodium bicarbonate to it. CA glues contain an acidic inhibitor, so introducing a base to neutralize it can really kick start polymerization. This is also why dry baking soda makes a good filler when you need (or don't mind) something white and darn near hard as a rock. This also happens to a lesser degree when CA comes in contact with the tannins in wood.

    For the sake of completeness and safety, I guess I should mention that CA's curing reaction is exothermic, so in larger voids you can get quite a bit of heat...and more so if you use an accelerator. As small as my gaps were, I saw tiny wisps of 'smoke' rise from them after spraying on the activator. Those wisps are boiled off CA particles, which highlights the need for airway safety.
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  3. #1083
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Water does work but too much can weaken the bond and creating fogginess or foaming. If you like using water, you can try adding a sodium bicarbonate to it. CA glues contain an acidic inhibitor, so introducing a base to neutralize it can really kick start polymerization. This is also why dry baking soda makes a good filler when you need (or don't mind) something white and darn near hard as a rock. This also happens to a lesser degree when CA comes in contact with the tannins in wood.

    For the sake of completeness and safety, I guess I should mention that CA's curing reaction is exothermic, so in larger voids you can get quite a bit of heat...and more so if you use an accelerator. As small as my gaps were, I saw tiny wisps of 'smoke' rise from them after spraying on the activator. Those wisps are boiled off CA particles, which highlights the need for airway safety.
    Interesting. I usually just breath on the joint, no liqquid water. The exotherm is relevant to your gap filling. Actually wood usually has enough water to polymerise CA but O rings, say, need a little help.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  4. #1084
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    Well I don’t need to mansplain, sorry, you are obviously expert.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  5. #1085
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Well I don’t need to mansplain, sorry, you are obviously expert.
    Nah. I drink beer and I know things. And often just enough of either or both to talk myself out of my depth with the real experts.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #1086
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Nah. I drink beer and I know things. And often just enough of either or both to talk myself out of my depth with the real experts.
    There is a trivia team, one of our opposition, named "We Drink Beer and We Know Things." It's in Greenville SC.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #1087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    I am in the midst of patching some cracks in my 71-year-old living room plaster ceiling. The material is unusual, at least in my experience. It is not lath and plaster, but is 3/8" of plaster on a plasterboard substrate. That plaster layer is about 1/4" of rough material and finished with about 1/8" of white plaster. If I remember correctly my dad said the rough stuff on the ceiling is mixed with vermiculite to reduce the weight. I don't know whether this was commonplace in the late 1940s, but it was my parents' choice for this custom-built house, which they built themselves. The substrate pieces are 18" wide and probably 4' long, nailed crossways to the joists. The room is about 21' wide, with the joists being part of the roof truss. The cracks are straight lines under where the edges of the substrate pieces come together. The worst one is down the center line and has been recurring for as long as I can remember, and has been patched twice at about 25-year intervals. The others have cropped up more recently and are just hairlines. This could be from long term settling and drying out of the wood framing, or there could be some seasonal expansion and contraction. When I finish the patching I will apply a coat of primer to the patches but otherwise wait a long time before painting, to see how well it holds up. I am in no hurry to sell the place and I can live with a less-than-perfect ceiling for a while.

    To spice up the home front, a fluorescent ceiling light suddenly failed totally. My test meter shows the juice reaching the connections, so my guess is that the ballast failed. It has four bulbs and I would not expect them to go totally dark all at once. They usually start flickering and get dim first. I ordered a new ballast from Home Depot, to be picked up at the store tomorrow whenever they can get it ready for pickup. As I understand our Governor's emergency stay-at-home order, trips to a hardware or building supply store are exempt.

    I have plenty of long-neglected cleanup and upkeep work on this place to keep me busy during this crisis.
    Update: The ballast replacement went without a hitch. The old and new ballasts had wiring diagrams on them which matched, with the wires being color coded.

    As I get more and more ultra-thin coats of joint compound onto the ceiling, it fades into the adjoining painted surface, which is flat white. I can see small undulations and cavities under grazing light, and I fill them accordingly. I am doing this during the evening, after doing groundskeeping during the day. I have a lot of shrubbery that needs extensive pruning, which I am doing mostly with small hand shears rather than using a power trimmer. I am doing this for two reasons. One is to have something to do slow and easy while riding out this emergency stay-home order. The other is that much of this shrubbery needs a lot of selective thinning of the crown rather than a buzz cut which would take off 3 to 6 inches of foliage and leave bare branches below. With some selective cutting of some gaps in the crown, sunlight will go deep and in a few weeks there will be sprouts down there.

  8. #1088
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    Veneers applied and planed down to about 1/32". The way in which I made and applied the veneer resulted in a bit less symmetry, that is, some of the cracking on the right side wasn't visible. So I added some of my own with a couple of gouges, then filled them.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  9. #1089
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    I showed my wife your picture of the "crotch-figured" board. "Oh My!" she said.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #1090
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    I've been uninspired recently. I should be seizing this opportunity during the Current Unpleasantness (thanks for that label Grant) to play with any project in blissful solitude, but it's a struggle. That said, I'm happy to see and read of DIY projects continuing, and I'm getting some inspiration.

    I think it's fear of the great plane wreck. The challenge is to affix fuselage and floats, guided by the jig I made months ago:







    Getting the angles right is testing me. There is supposed to be a diagonal strut in there too that creates the triangles that actually give the whole assembly strength. That's when it'll get tricky. I can only bring myself to work on it a for a few minutes every few days.
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  11. #1091
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    Torsten, your photos make me anxious to finish up my Nautilus model and start building the wooden ship model I have queued up.

  12. #1092
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Torsten, your photos make me anxious to finish up my Nautilus model and start building the wooden ship model I have queued up.
    Oh, I'd like to see those.

  13. #1093
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    I decided that waiting for temperature to warm up a bit before getting back to woodworking was stupid, especially since Central Oregon's winter seems endless. I have to run space heaters for several hours before it gets warm enough to be semi-comfortable. So I cleared off the workbench and table saw of quarantined food items and started making a - I don't know what to call it. A compartmented tray to sit on the coffee table. It will hold the tissue box (compartment sized to fit), various pencils, reading glasses and whatever else normally loiters. I got tired of the table being such a clutter. I'm using scrap mahogany from the chest of drawers project (which is still on hold until warm weather arrives). So far, I've resawed, planed and sized all the pieces. Next up, I try out my new Rockler box joint jig. No photos yet.

  14. #1094
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    Not much news from the shop today. After seeing to some shop chores, I broke down the oak board a little more to give me some stock for the lamination strips and since I had the bandsaw out, I roughed out the legs. I printed a full size drawing of the leg profile, affixed it to the work piece, and rough cut the outline, leaving some waste for final shaping and smoothing.



    This piece is 2 inches thick and will be split down the middle to make two legs.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #1095
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    Today I had an adventure cutting down a large dead dogwood tree that was leaning over the back fence and overhanging the neighbor's yard. Since a dogwood is a small tree, by large I meant about 6 inches thick at the base and perhaps 15 feet high. To bring it down away from the fence I started by sawing out a wedge on the side away from the fence. Then I hitched a ratchet-driven winch called "ComeAlong" to the tree and anchored it to a steel stake driven deep into the ground. After applying some tension I started sawing from the other side, using the standard lumberjack method of felling a tree. When I got far enough that the wood started to crack, I started pulling it over with the winch, having made sure I had a clear path to escape. As it happened the tree fell sideways into some bushes, but at least it was well clear of the fence.

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    The first photo is a close-up of the winch and the top few inches of the stake. The second is a view of the setup before starting to cut from the far side. The third shows the tree partially down, with the crown bearing against the bushes. The fourth shows it as far as it would go. The fifth shows the stake and the saw afterward. The stake is a broken front-suspension torsion bar from a 1957 Plymouth. The saw is probably about my age. My educated guess is that my dad bought it at Sears in the summer of 1948, when he was clearing the land to build our dream home. I was 3 months old at the time.

    That hand sawing was enough work for one day. After resting some more I will get back to work in cutting it up. The exercise was a pretty good substitute for the swimming I would have been doing otherwise. The pool and gym at our local military installation are closed because of the virus. I have plenty of work to do on this place to keep me busy during this crisis.

  16. #1096
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    I have plenty of things to do around the place as well. I don't seem to be doing them.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  17. #1097
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I have plenty of things to do around the place as well. I don't seem to be doing them.
    Be a DIY philosopher. Write a book.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  18. #1098
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I decided that waiting for temperature to warm up a bit before getting back to woodworking was stupid, especially since Central Oregon's winter seems endless. I have to run space heaters for several hours before it gets warm enough to be semi-comfortable. So I cleared off the workbench and table saw of quarantined food items and started making a - I don't know what to call it. A compartmented tray to sit on the coffee table. It will hold the tissue box (compartment sized to fit), various pencils, reading glasses and whatever else normally loiters. I got tired of the table being such a clutter. I'm using scrap mahogany from the chest of drawers project (which is still on hold until warm weather arrives). So far, I've resawed, planed and sized all the pieces. Next up, I try out my new Rockler box joint jig. No photos yet.
    Done. Turned out fine. I did have a bit of problem with the box joint jig that I traced to not measuring the distance between the router bit and the brass indexing key precisely enough. It needed to be exactly 1/4 inch but was just a skoosh off. I have on order a set of precision brass setup bars.

    It's basically a kitchen drawer divider except sized to fit the table and has a compartment sized for a tissue box.

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    Meanwhile, Central Oregon seems to have passed from winter to spring, meaning the days are warmer and I can complete my chest of drawers project. I need to apply the finish outside, not in the garage/woodshop.

  19. 2020-Apr-12, 01:38 PM


  20. #1099
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    Finishing up the Pakistani chest of drawers. Almost done.

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  21. #1100
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    The photo's got me curious why some drawers have glides mounted on the sides and others on the bottom!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #1101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The photo's got me curious why some drawers have glides mounted on the sides and others on the bottom!
    I'm guessing the larger drawers have the glides on the bottom to provide more support, since they (and, presumably, the stuff in them) will be heavier.

    But that's just a guess on my part.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  23. #1102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The photo's got me curious why some drawers have glides mounted on the sides and others on the bottom!
    It's about the attachment points available. I prefer side-mounted but the sides of the case don't provide suitable places to mount slides for the larger drawers on the side. The position of the middle rails on the sides of the case don't match up with where an upper drawer side-mounted slide needs to be.

  24. #1103
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    In between finishing coats on the chest of drawers, now that I have my precision brass spacers, I'm making a small box to hide the battery and switch for the Nautilus model. Mostly I'm practicing making box joints.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  25. #1104
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    It's about the attachment points available. I prefer side-mounted but the sides of the case don't provide suitable places to mount slides for the larger drawers on the side. The position of the middle rails on the sides of the case don't match up with where an upper drawer side-mounted slide needs to be.
    I would never have thought to mount them in a horizontal position, and I imagine they'll be more prone to bending under load in that configuration. Is it a concern?

    I saw the Nautilus model in the other thread. Nice!

  26. #1105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I would never have thought to mount them in a horizontal position, and I imagine they'll be more prone to bending under load in that configuration. Is it a concern?

    I saw the Nautilus model in the other thread. Nice!
    Thanks!

    As to the slides, I don't anticipate a problem. They're very substantial slides - maybe a little over-engineered but that's typically how I do things.

  27. #1106
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    Final stages of the chest of drawers project. A small hitch caused by my faulty memory. The top section has two drawer sizes and two drawer handle sizes. The drawer handles required my cutting out a hole shaped to their complicated dimensions using a scroll saw. I did that last year for the smaller drawers and years ago for the larger ones. One thing I discovered when doing the scroll saw work was two of the holes in the handle plates were far too close to the handle mechanism, particularly with the smaller handles. A bad design, really. My preference was to attach the handles using brass screws but with the smaller ones, that was not possible. So I opted for small brass bolts. The nut and washer on the inside would afford a much better grip on the wood. You can see what I talking about in this photo of an uninstalled small handle:

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    The bottom holes are just way too close to the cutout. So these hole are slightly larger to accommodate bolts.

    The larger drawer/handles had more room on the bottom holes, although I'd still prefer more. I'm using screws here and I hope they hold (if they don't, I can disassemble and convert to bolts).

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    The hitch I refer to was my failing to remember that I had sized the smaller handle holes for bolts, so when I went to attach them with screws, I found the holes too large. Then I remembered. So I had to dismount all four small drawer fronts so I could access the backs to install nuts and washers.

    I'm in the ninth year of this project but the end is in sight.

  28. #1107
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    Very pretty! I love the look of brass. As an engineer, of course, bronze is preferred.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #1108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Very pretty! I love the look of brass. As an engineer, of course, bronze is preferred.
    With these little brass screws, I have to be very careful not to over-torque them!

  30. #1109
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    With these little brass screws, I have to be very careful not to over-torque them!
    Been there, done that (while holding my breath) using the Brusso hardware during the magazine caddie build. They even included an equivalent steel screw to 'tap' the predrilled holes.
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  31. #1110
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Been there, done that (while holding my breath) using the Brusso hardware during the magazine caddie build. They even included an equivalent steel screw to 'tap' the predrilled holes.
    That's a good idea.

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