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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1471
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Speaking of the Rockler box joint jig, did you also pick up any of the box joint cauls? I visited Rockler during our recent trip to Minnesota and grabbed several. I should make a box just so I can try them out.
    I didn't but that's quite nifty, the way they apply pressure to the fingers in each direction. I may have to get some.

    I'll go with a softer wood for the case. It'll be easier of the bit. Maybe alder.

  2. #1472
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    They do seem nifty. I've made my own out of wood but had to take pains about glue sticking to them.
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  3. #1473
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    Well then, here is my new turntable.

    You may recently have seen that somewhat viral Youtube video about the huge effort/cost involved with making a really nice base (plinth) for a certain tonearm and motor unit combo. I don't want that, and I can't make them that nice. Also, I have a collection of tonearms and motor units and I want to try out combinations which you can't do with that approach. So I took a radically different approach with the base. I wanted it to be as modular as possible, but as it sits in the living room I also wanted it to look decent and not like some work-in-progress that is more at home in a shed.

    As I'm not the only one in this situation, but my knowledge and equipment through my business allows me to build these, I decided to offer the base commercially.

    Photos of the result can be seen on my website:
    https://www.measured.be/

    I spent the day building the website; I'm eager to try out my better cartridges in the coming days. I want to hear the full potential of all this.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  4. #1474
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    All I can say is "Wow".
    I like yours better than that viral one.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #1475
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    "Wow" is an understatement! I really like how form follows function, and then those wood insert panels add a softening contrast to the metal. Beautiful.

  6. #1476
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    As for block pavers, we recently had a landscaping guy give an estimate for putting concrete or gravel (he used the term three quarter minus) in our side yard where we want a covered patio. Really expensive, and he said they aren't doing pavers because of the project backlog (our town is experiencing a construction/remodeling boom) - pavers take too long. So I very briefly explored the idea of setting pavers down as a DIY project. Yikes! That's a lot of work! And we'd probably screw up the leveling.
    It's definitely a lot of work. I did all the excavating manually as well as moving about ~7 m3 (9 yd3) of 1/4- sand into place, plate packing, and then spent hours levelling it. I graded it to a 1% slope that continues around the corner of the house where the completed perimeter will be a circular arc of radius ~3.6 m. The centre of this arc is actually inside the house, so I can't use a nail and string to lay it out in the sand as I did years ago when I did the other side of the house. Instead, I dug out my old curve-by-tangent-offset spreadsheet to calculate the starting points and offsets from extensions of the two long straight line sections. Reminded me of doing road layout! I'll post some pics when all the full bricks are in place. After that, the remaining bricks need to be cut to fit. There's a saw I can rent, so I'll probably do that in one day spurts over a few weeks.

  7. #1477
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Well then, here is my new turntable.
    I think "Well, done!" or "Nice!" doesn't cut it. That is awesome.

  8. #1478
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    It's definitely a lot of work..... After that, ...
    After that, come to my house and do my patio!

  9. #1479
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Well then, here is my new turntable.

    You may recently have seen that somewhat viral Youtube video about the huge effort/cost involved with making a really nice base (plinth) for a certain tonearm and motor unit combo. I don't want that, and I can't make them that nice. Also, I have a collection of tonearms and motor units and I want to try out combinations which you can't do with that approach. So I took a radically different approach with the base. I wanted it to be as modular as possible, but as it sits in the living room I also wanted it to look decent and not like some work-in-progress that is more at home in a shed.

    As I'm not the only one in this situation, but my knowledge and equipment through my business allows me to build these, I decided to offer the base commercially.

    Photos of the result can be seen on my website:
    https://www.measured.be/

    I spent the day building the website; I'm eager to try out my better cartridges in the coming days. I want to hear the full potential of all this.
    Today I found time to install my good cartridge with a brand new stylus. Took my time to set all angles and forces as they should. The result is very fine indeed. All the detail and quality that I desire without sounding tiresome.

    Now I still need to find the courage to install my really really good cartridge, which doesn't have a stylus protector.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  10. #1480
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    After that, come to my house and do my patio!
    I think this is the last time I install pavers... I'm getting too old for this!
    Pics:
    The volume of sand worked out well. I have only a small fraction of a wheel barrow load left over.

    View from back after packing and grading the sand:

    And closer views, moving from driveway to back. If I've done the layout of the outer perimeter row properly, there should be very little waste cutting to fill the gaps along the straight segments. It's located so that when a brick is cut to fill a small gap near the house, the remaining piece should fit on the opposite side of the path. The biggest gaps along the back wall and perimeter should all be filled by a single brick cut in two.

    So far, there are 2177 pavers placed.
    I'm not sure when I'll continue. I have company arriving and the temperature is supposed to reach 38C in the next few days.
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  11. #1481
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    You are braver than me! I've placed some bricks around the (small) pool, and I'm too lazy to fixate them any more than just laying them on the soil directly. Especially the part that is in stairs could use some cement. One day...
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  12. #1482
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    The volume of sand worked out well. I have only a small fraction of a wheel barrow load left over.
    Which is much better than the alternative!
    Looks nice!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #1483
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    I haven't been terribly motivated in the woodshop lately but I was yesterday, so I set up to work on the model ship case. It will employ box joints. After rolling out the router table and configuring the jig for 3/8 inch cuts, I discovered that I did not, in fact, own a 3/8 inch up-cut router bit. Or even a down-cut one. Arrgh.

    Back to waiting on Rockler delivery. Again.

  14. #1484
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    The fact that I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about is a good indication of our relative woodworking skills!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #1485
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The fact that I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about is a good indication of our relative woodworking skills!
    LOL. I'm referring to a spiral router bit that's designed to transport the waste material 'up' along the shaft as it cuts (mounted in a router table, it would be in the 'down' direction). They're the bees knees for making box joint cuts, as I understand it. Also for mortise and tenon work. When I purchased my box joint jig, I thought I had also bought both a 1/4 and a 3/8 router bit. Turns out, just the 1/4.

    https://www.rockler.com/onsrud-up-cu...s-1-2-in-shank

  16. #1486
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    I finished cutting the bricks eight days ago. I savored the accomplishment for a day before doing a three day trip to Edmonton and back on the bike to take care of some business. Despite the whirlwind pace of that trip, it was a welcome break from my home. I might've forgotten about all the wildfires but for the smoke in the air. But I digress...

    It took three long days to cut ~225 bricks. Most cuts yielded two useable pieces, with the second piece seldom fitting anywhere without having to be further cut down. The trick to not wasting any is to fill the largest gaps first, and only cut whole bricks if none of the fractional pieces is large enough. I made a few mistakes, but my overall wastage was really low.

    Along the garage:


    View off the deck:


    Ignoring irregularities in size and fit, can you spot the flaw(s) in the last one I placed?


    I'll buy a few more and set a single row below the long side of the deck. This will provide a distinct edge to the lawn and simplify mowing. I also need to shore up the edges and gently slope it back to the existing lawn. That'll take a pickup load or two of fill and topsoil. Next year I will probably build some large planters for the corner of the house by the cantilever where it gets really warm in summer and grow tomatoes there. And one day there may be a heat pump set on it in the longer window-less part of the wall.

    Also next year, I hope to resurface the deck (which will probably require replacing a joist and some plywood because water found its way behind the flashing), build new stairs, and finally put up a railing so that it's safe for the little granddaughter and inebriated adults.
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    Last edited by Torsten; 2021-Jul-18 at 01:11 AM.

  17. #1487
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    First one on the right hand edge seems to be on a diet.

    Very clean work and an elegant result!
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #1488
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    Nice job, Torsten!

  19. #1489
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    You know the problem with this thread? The "adventures" part. I'd prefer it was just boring and successful.
    So, for several weeks now -- maybe more than several -- I've been thinking of putting some shelves up in the broom closet, with assorted hooks to hang stuff on as well. Even bought shelves and brackets a week or so ago.
    And drywall anchors. This type of drywall anchors, because they seem more secure than others. How they work: You drill a hole in the drywall, having first determined that there isn't actually anything solid behind it. A slightly smaller hole than the anchor diameter. Then drive the anchor into the hole and, (this is the important part), turn the screw (righty-tighty) to pull the nut on the far end of the anchor and pull the expanding part up against the drywall. Stop when it gets tight.
    That takes quite a few turns, so I got out the cordless drill. (Cordless drills are the greatest invention of the last 50 years or so.) Run the screw in until it seems to be resisting, then finish off with a hand screwdriver. Now remove the screw and use it to hang the bracket. Uh, wait....
    Three of four were just fine. One, not surprisingly the first one I did, was not. It rotated freely, but neither came out nor got tighter. I spun it quite a few turns in either direction without result.
    Having got frustrated, I took a break. Tried again, including attempting to get a screwdriver under the head and pry the whole mess out. No go. Frustrated again.
    Finally I went "down below" to the old garage to look for more tools. Was finally able to get a Vise-Grip* plier to lock onto the screw head, pull out, and start twisting so that it began to unscrew. And then was able to run it on out with the drill.
    What I think happened: When I initially ran the screw in with the drill, I went a tad too far. The insert sucked into the backside of the drywall just a bit, and the bit of unthreaded shank on the screw came out of the nut in the end. No threads engaged, either in or out. Pulling the head with the Vise-Grip got me just enough extra movement to get the threads to engage.
    With an eighth of an inch of bracket adding thickness, it'll be no problem from here on.
    Four more tomorrow.

    *A genuine Vise-Grip, from the Petersen Manufacturing Co of DeWitt, Nebraska. I'd say "accept no substitute" but there's no option any more.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  20. #1490
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    Been there, swore at that.

  21. #1491
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Nice job, Torsten!
    Agreed. That's beautiful.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  22. #1492
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    Thanks!

    The flaw is in the way the last triangular piece, at the intersection of the two rows, is cut and aligned. Beveled edges everywhere else touch inside bricks, and the cut side touches the outside row. This one should have a single beveled edge and two cut faces.

  23. #1493
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Thanks!

    The flaw is in the way the last triangular piece, at the intersection of the two rows, is cut and aligned. Beveled edges everywhere else touch inside bricks, and the cut side touches the outside row. This one should have a single beveled edge and two cut faces.
    I am SO going to have to go back and look at this when I've had less wine.
    Meanwhile, I've made significant progress on both the broom closet and coat rack over the last couple days, although my wife suggested a slight change in direction on the latter this afternoon.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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