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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1381
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    That sounds like quite a large job, Treb. But as long as there's progress, you'll get there.
    It's really not a large job. It's just that I'm doing well to spend 3-5 hours a week on it. Not because I'm busy, just not in the mood.
    Here are the shelves, in two orientations because I never know how pictures are going to post.
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    And if you don't have the clamps you'd love, love the clamps you have!
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    Editing after post: Wow, the rotating pictures are awesome. Both were taken with the phone held in portrait mode. Both loaded into my editor rotated 90 degrees to landscape. After resizing, I saved them just as they were, then rotated and resaved with "90" added to the name.
    The originals came into the edit space in portrait before I saved. After saving, when I click on them, they turn 90 degrees. It's just weird. And how did "clamps90" wind up inverted? Assuming it still looks that way when I save.

    Also, the wall behind the shelves is all one color. I don't know why it looks like it isn't. And the next step I'm putting off is to screw the 2x4's across the benchtop boards to hold them together. The 2x6's are less straight than I'd like and it's going to be awkward. The picture shows the bottom, by the way.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2021-May-17 at 08:30 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  2. #1382
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    Why did I never think of the daisychained clamps trick?
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  3. #1383
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Why did I never think of the daisychained clamps trick?
    Lack of desperation?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #1384
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    No, that wasn't it. That definitely wasn't it. You should see the contraptions that I've made to clamp things.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  5. #1385
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Did you obtain the glass for it when you started?!
    No, and none of the hardware. All I've done is make the tube, which comprises fiberglass covered slats similar to a canoe.

  6. #1386
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And the next step I'm putting off is to screw the 2x4's across the benchtop boards to hold them together. The 2x6's are less straight than I'd like and it's going to be awkward. The picture shows the bottom, by the way.
    I used 2x6's to form the top of my 'main' workbench but now wish I hadn't. The surface just isn't as nice to work on as the MDF-topped table that now resides in the middle of the workshop. The location might have something to do with it. I figure that if (when) the MDF gets too messed up over time, I can easily replace it being held down with just screws. The 2x6 workbench is certainly sturdier and more suitable for heavy stuff but as it turns out, I don't do a lot of heavy work. Maybe I was flashing back to my days of engine rebuilding.

  7. #1387
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    That probably would have been better for this application. The last 2x6, which I've nicknamed "Twisty" is especially problematic.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #1388
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    My bench is fixed to the wall, with a working surface of about 30" x 114". I built a simple 2x4 frame and screwed one side of it to the wall with the other side supported by a leg on each end. Then I lay short pieces of 2x4 (with a lot of wane), wide face up, on top of the frame, attaching each with a single screw (ETA - actually, I may not have screwed each one into place). That way I could use the better portions of low grade lumber. The short lengths reduced the effect of twist and bowing. A 1x4 was attached to the front to hide the ends and their rather unsightly wane. Then I screwed down a piece of 1/2" OSB for the final surface. I haven't had to change it in 19 years.

  9. #1389
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    I've just screwed the top together. Mr. Twisty was making it impossible to get the cross-members to sit flat on the rest so I took him out and reclamped. Then clamped the crossmembers down, drilled holes, and drove screws.
    Having done so, I fitted Mr. T back in, trying all four possible orientations to see which worked best. Which was the one I'd started with. Then I forced the twist out as much as possible -- which was surprisingly much -- with clamps and put in screws.
    I'm going to leave the clamps on overnight or longer and hope it'll relax into the new shape a bit.

    ETA: All of this is on the bottom. There'll be no visible screws in the upper surface. I hope.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #1390
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    Decisions, decisions. The new bench and such are to be painted white. I've got a partial one-gallon can of the white paint and a partial five-gallon bucket. They are nominally the same but will they actually match if I run out of the gallon and have to get into the five? What I SHOULD do, I suppose, is open both and mix them together. But I'm not feeling much like doing it today.
    So I guess I'll go do the dishes instead.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #1391
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    Ok, I brought the large bucket up and mixed the two containers. Not without some difficulty (getting the lid off the five-gallon one) and cursing (at the moron who disposed of his used roller covers by just dropping them in the bucket and putting the lid on. I've probably got about two gallons total, which is a good thing because one coat isn't going to cover the bare wood.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #1392
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    So I finally got tired of futzing with the balky chuck on my ancient drill press (the oldest power tool in my shop) and bought a new, keyless chuck. Seems well-made and everything but it's about 3 cm longer than the OEM chuck. The drill press isn't real big to begin with so I'm a little worried that I'll run out of room under the drill bit too often.

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  13. #1393
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    Your drill press looks very much like mine, which is branded Ryobi. May have come from the same factory in China!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #1394
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    My ancient "Dart" (Belgian brand, "they don't build 'em like that anymore" quality) drill press still is my sweetheart. I've added a cross vise to it and I can't stress the added value of easy XY movement of your workpiece enough enough. It transforms a drill press into a serious production tool. Lining stuff up is just so very convenient with a cross vise or XY table. Now my cross vise unfortunately is a Chinese one with more play than Broadway, but you can lock the axes which helps. Also one of the axes rotates in the opposite direction from what you'd expect. But even then it is still huge added value to your drill press in my opinion.

    If you want a good cross vise you'll either have to buy a really expensive one as all cheap and medium expensive ones are loose which is wasted money in the end, or spend a possibly equal amount of money on an XY table and stationary vise. However in my experience "cheap" XY tables are more precise than cheap cross vices so it's less likely to end as a paper weight.

    My drill press developed an issue where it wouldn't start to turn half of the time. I've since bought a new starter capacitor, but unfortunately it appears to be JUST a bit too large to fit in the housing, so I still do a hand-assisted start with the old cap.

    With all the large powertools in my shop, the trick was to find stuff that is meant to run on a single phase supply. In Belgium, single phase from the wall is 220V 16A (in my separate garage; in house even 20A) so we can't complain, but still most heavy powertools are 3 phase 220V or 3 phase 380V which my house doesn't have. For a drill press it was no problem, but finding one the size of my Dart in single phase wasn't easy. For the lathe it was trickier. For the mill it was very tricky.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2021-May-22 at 09:26 PM.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  15. #1395
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    I've thought about a good vise for the drill press but always concluded that I should upgrade to a bigger model first.

    And yeah, mine is indeed made in China but it's still running fine after several decades.

  16. #1396
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    I don't know how it is in the US, but overhere stout old drill presses are the one tool that is rather easy to buy cheap second hand. I paid something like 70 for mine. You can add a zero for the mill or lathe.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #1397
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    I suspect the same here. I popped in a search on Facebook Marketplace (which is by no means only place to buy used power tools) and found quite a few nearby offers for used drill presses, including a Ryobi that looks quite similar to my Craftsman. Might be the model Trebuchet has.

  18. #1398
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    I'm continuing the work on the modular benchwork for the model train layout-to-be. Huge job. 700 screws and somehow I decided on using a good old screwdriver. Saves time and money in the gym I guess...

    Predrilling and countersinking before screwing has resulted in zero split wood so far, so that's awesome. I might become not terrible at woodworking one day.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  19. #1399
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    Have you no cordless drill to drive the screws? Greatest invention of the 20th century!
    Meanwhile, by the end of the day I should have all the leg assemblies and underside of the benchtop sufficiently painted. Then when the yard guy comes he can help me flip it over.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  20. #1400
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    I used to have a cordless drill, and for whatever reason my main experience with it was stripping heads. The battery died so now I don't have one anymore.

    Any suggestions for a good model? Should I go 12V or 18V? WHich function is a must-have to use it as screwdriver instead of drill (eg torque limiter)? Brands available in my region are Metabo, Makita, DeWalt, Power Plus, Hitachi... I'll make it short by saying we don't have Harbour Freight/Milwaukee/most US brands here.

    I've just checked and everything except for PowerPlus is quite a bit more expensive than I was willing to pay for one, though I see some not overly expensive DeWalt.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2021-May-24 at 08:27 PM.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  21. #1401
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Any suggestions for a good model?
    I have cordless drivers and drills from Bosch, DeWalt, and Milwaukee and all are solid performers.

    Should I go 12V or 18V? WHich function is a must-have to use it as screwdriver instead of drill (eg torque limiter)? Brands available in my region are Metabo, Makita, DeWalt, Power Plus, Hitachi... I'll make it short by saying we don't have Harbour Freight/Milwaukee/most US brands here.
    My workhorses are Bosch 12V Max drivers: a pocket driver and impact driver combo kit, and 3/8" drill/driver I picked up to supplement them. It's nice to have a proper chuck in addition to the -inch hex bit holder. I have used the ever-lovin'-heck out these things and they've not let me down. The 12V Max system provides good torque in a small package and recharges quickly. They fit better into tight spaces since they don't have a brick battery hanging off of the grip.

    I also have a Bosch -inch cordless drill for heavier work...drilling big holes with bits or hole saws; driving lots of screws, big screws, etc.; and mixing paint, mortar, or grout. The DeWalt is an inline screwdriver that I keep at the router table to raise/lower the router. The Milwaukee is a right-angle drill/driver for making holes in wall framing.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2021-May-24 at 09:15 PM. Reason: bad speeling!
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  22. #1402
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    Here are some examples I've window(s) shopped:

    Smaller form, "low" torque (34Nm, no idea how that translates to what kind of scew job is still possible)
    https://www.coolblue.be/nl/product/1...-**-basic.html

    Larger form factor, "high" torque (65Nm)
    https://www.coolblue.be/nl/product/8...ge-bitset.html

    If you take the bit set into account, the difference between both is only 36€.

    Remember, the primary use for me would be as a screwdriver because I have (corded) drills for the drill work. Then again, given the sorry state of my current drill...Perhaps the vastly more powerful DeWalt could replace the current drill for many jobs (anything that doesn't require hammering). But maybe I'd be annoyed by how large it is for screwdriving jobs...Of course, for those tight space jobs you can always use, you know, a screwdriver.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  23. #1403
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    Can you afford a Hilti? I suppose I could, but it's way more than I need!
    One thing to consider is what other tools you might want that use the same battery system. From Ryobi, I have a drill, circular saw, jig saw, hand vacuum, hedge trimmer, and weed eater that all use the same batteries.
    One of my best moments was working on a catapult with my co-worker Ray, the toolman, and pulling out the cordless circular saw. The only time I ever saw him envious of one of my tools.
    And don't discount the cordless for drilling. It's extremely handy not to have to plug it in for a couple of holes. I rarely use my corded drill any more. What I need is more than one of them, so I could have a drill bit in one and a screwdriver bit in the other.

    ETA: Do NOT get anything with NiCd batteries. If anyone even sells them any more. Li-ion are vastly superior.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #1404
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    I can technically afford a Hilti, but I don't want to spend that much on it. And if I did, I'd go for one that can drill in stone as well so it could do all my drilling jobs, which would be even more expensive. So I was looking for something far more affordable to mainly help me with the screwdriving.

    I have to correct myself, I can buy Milwaukee overhere.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  25. #1405
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    And to make it more complex for myself, I can buy a DeWalt which can do stone as well for low 200's. Which would reduce my poor old corded drill to "spare". Which isn't bad; when you constantly need to switch bits/drills on a job it's nice to have multiple drills laying around.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #1406
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    I have a 20V DeWalt cordless drill which has worked quite well for years, and the two batteries are still going strong as well. Bonus is that the batteries also fit my new small handheld router.

    I also have a small Skil with an integral 4V battery - it's great for driving screws in softer wood and for taking appliances and such apart.

  27. #1407
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    I'm already a few hundred screws further by now, so it's getting less relevant. Quite the workout for my arms though!

    Onto benchtop 6 of 10.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  28. #1408
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    Called it a day, I've started on benchtop 7.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  29. #1409
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    The tank for our two little clownfish started to leak at one of the seams, so we knew that we'd have to move them to something new. I was able to patch the leak with silicone from the outside that it was no longer an emergency, and so we decided to use it as an excuse to upgrade to a fancy bow front aquarium. I built a stand (with a matching curved front), with space for a sump with a refugium below. Getting the curve to match was tricky, and finding hinges that would work well (letting the door pull away from the front, so it didn't just bump against the frame) was also tricky. It's not perfect, but I'm fairly proud of it, and the fish seem to be settling in to their new space.

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    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  30. #1410
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    I think it turned out quite well. Is that bottom tank what you refer to as a refugium? I suppose I could look it up but what is its purpose?

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