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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #961
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Moving on with my Pakistani chest of drawers project while I await delivery of brass screws: making the legs. This required building a custom jig - cutting tapers on the table saw is not straight forward.
    I also made another one-off tapering jig to cut some angles for the ceiling fan mount. It made me think again that I need to make a more permanent jig and my Amazon list now has candidate parts in it.

    Did you taper all four faces of those legs?
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  2. #962
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I also made another one-off tapering jig to cut some angles for the ceiling fan mount. It made me think again that I need to make a more permanent jig and my Amazon list now has candidate parts in it.

    Did you taper all four faces of those legs?
    Yes, all four.

  3. #963
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    And we have an operational ceiling fan...

    ...just in time for next summer.
    Looking good!

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    … Worked fine.
    As you once told me, "Whatever gets the job done."

    A few years ago I made a half round table where the four legs each had one long taper cut, and I'm wracking my brain to remember what the jig looked like. I did it on the table saw too, but I took no pictures of it. I don't think it was as solid as yours, and was probably dangerous... I was a newbie to the table saw .

  4. #964
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    The brass screws for my chest of drawer project came in, so I'm installing the brass strips. I have to be careful to not tighten them too much. Brass breaks easily. My procedure was to drill holes in the brass slightly bigger than the #6 screws, drill a countersink to allow the oval head screws to sit in nicely and then use my one centering drill bit to punch a hole in the mahogany to accept the screw. That works OK although I feel the drill bit is one size too large. The screw took little effort to drive in, which is OK as the brass piece is decorative and doesn't require much holding power. But I wanted a little more bite. So, for the next one, I made sure the drill only penetrated about an eighth inch into the wood, enough to center the screw. That didn't work at all. The mahogany is tough wood and I had to use too much force to drive the screw. And the screw really resisted gaining a bite in the wood to begin with. So for the next one, I did the centering drill an eighth inch as before but then switched to a smaller bit to complete the hole. That works about right. The only problem is that I have to be really careful to drive the small bit precisely in the center of the shallow hole or the screw will tend to shift the brass plate slightly. It's tedious. I should just wait and go buy a smaller centering bit.

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  5. #965
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    I like that those are slotted screws instead of Philips. I hate them in general, but they are much more period appropriate for your project.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #966
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I like that those are slotted screws instead of Philips. I hate them in general, but they are much more period appropriate for your project.
    Yes. I found some of the correct size at the local hardware store but they were philips. Definitely needed slotted, so I had to order them.

  7. #967
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    I finished the bottom section of my Pakistani chest of drawers project and it's immediately been pressed into service. I sized and sanded a piece of plywood to serve as the top to keep the cats from nesting in the top drawers. The mahogany is finished with just a couple of coats of Danish oil and is probably the weakest aspect of the project. I'm just not a good finisher.

    I've included a photo of the top section carcass, still a work in progress.

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  8. #968
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I finished the bottom section of my Pakistani chest of drawers project and it's immediately been pressed into service. I sized and sanded a piece of plywood to serve as the top to keep the cats from nesting in the top drawers. The mahogany is finished with just a couple of coats of Danish oil and is probably the weakest aspect of the project. I'm just not a good finisher.

    I've included a photo of the top section carcass, still a work in progress.

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    It looks very nice, I would be happy to have it in my house.

  9. #969
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    I can only dream of building something that nice.

    Speaking of cats and drawers, many years ago I went to open a drawer in my chest with all my clothes in it. It was already partially open, but wouldn't go further. I finally pulled out the one below and found a cat in it. She'd jumped into the slightly open one, gone over the back into the one below, and settled down for a nap. And was quite annoyed that I had disturbed her beauty sleep.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #970
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    Nice work, geonuc. I look forward to seeing the top half completed.

    Meanwhile, it's noisy at my house today. I contracted the replacement of my roof, and the crew has returned this morning after a few days of wet weather to continue with it.

  11. #971
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    Continuing work on the top half of the chest of drawers, I've started making the drawer fronts for the middle section. Unlike the fronts for the bottom section and the side drawers of the top, the middle fronts are not frame & panel but rather a single solid piece of wood measuring 25 x 4 x 1/2 inches. The handles for these four drawers are smaller than the others so I had to make another template for the scroll saw work. These handles also have smaller screw holes so the #6 screws I bought for the larger handles will not fit. As I have sufficient extra #6 screws & nuts, I debated just enlarging the holes to accommodate but decided to order #4 screws & nuts instead.

    I like doing the scroll saw work. It's a bit delicate as some of the various bits on back side of the drawer handles come close to the edge of the handle face, requiring I cut out just so much wood but not any more. I don't have a fancy expensive scroll saw but the Shop Fox model I bought does the job. As with all power tools, I find it's important to have quality, sharp blades, especially since I'm cutting through a fairly thick piece of wood.

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    Last edited by geonuc; 2019-Oct-02 at 09:01 PM. Reason: typo

  12. #972
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    Well, maybe I'm back to Plan A - enlarge the holes. I can't find the proper #4 screws.

  13. #973
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    #4? Heck, back in my Boeing days I had assemblies that used #2!

    Ok, more seriously. #4 is ridiculously small. 40 threads per inch if it was a machine screw, which yours aren't. But I really did have #2's attaching tiny microswitches. Before Boeing I worked for a Heavy Machinery company where we had customer contracts prohibiting anything smaller than 3/8. #4 is .112 inch, or about 2.8mm. I use a minimum of 5/16 on my catapults.

    And I am insanely jealous of the work you guys can do. I barely come up to the standard of "incompetent carpentry".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #974
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    #4? Heck, back in my Boeing days I had assemblies that used #2!

    Ok, more seriously. #4 is ridiculously small. 40 threads per inch if it was a machine screw, which yours aren't. But I really did have #2's attaching tiny microswitches. Before Boeing I worked for a Heavy Machinery company where we had customer contracts prohibiting anything smaller than 3/8. #4 is .112 inch, or about 2.8mm. I use a minimum of 5/16 on my catapults.

    And I am insanely jealous of the work you guys can do. I barely come up to the standard of "incompetent carpentry".
    ETA: These are the microswitches in question. Far more reliable than the next size up, in my experience.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #975
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    #4? Heck, back in my Boeing days I had assemblies that used #2!

    Ok, more seriously. #4 is ridiculously small. 40 threads per inch if it was a machine screw, which yours aren't. But I really did have #2's attaching tiny microswitches. Before Boeing I worked for a Heavy Machinery company where we had customer contracts prohibiting anything smaller than 3/8. #4 is .112 inch, or about 2.8mm. I use a minimum of 5/16 on my catapults.

    And I am insanely jealous of the work you guys can do. I barely come up to the standard of "incompetent carpentry".
    Yeah, #4 is small, I know. I'd be happy to use #4-40 screws but I need them in brass and with a slotted oval head. The drawer handles come with #4 slotted brass wood screws but I don't trust them to hold.

  16. #976
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And I am insanely jealous of the work you guys can do. I barely come up to the standard of "incompetent carpentry".
    And yet you manage to get pumpkins airborne quite nicely, I understand.

    Thanks for the compliment. But my efforts are pitiful when compared to the works created by true craftsmen/women. I keep making mistakes because I don't really know what I'm doing. With this chest of drawers, for example, I made the carcasses for the two sections years ago. The joinery is standard dado joints. I knew from the start that I didn't need to make them especially clean in appearance because the small brass plates cover the joints. Which is fine, but I didn't realize that I designed no good method for securing the middle support frames to the sides other than sliding into the dados. Well, over time, the sides bowed just a bit and when it came time to build the drawers, I found all the dimensions off by too much. Interior pieces started to not fit as nicely as when I built the carcass (which I had not glued together yet). So I spent some time installing screws at various strategic points on the inside using my pocket hole jig. But what about those bowed side panels? I couldn't just drive screws through the sides and I was hesitant to risk using the pocket hole jig from the inside in case the wood cracked. Well, I ended up deciding to drill screws from the outside anyway. But to make it look pretty, I drilled out 1/4" holes, drove the screws and then used my plug cutter to make mahogany plugs to fill the holes, hiding the screws. It looks OK.

    My point is, however, that a better craftsman would have used sliding dovetail joints instead of dados. I didn't think of it at the time.

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