Page 48 of 50 FirstFirst ... 384647484950 LastLast
Results 1,411 to 1,440 of 1493

Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1411
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,208
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I think it turned out quite well. Is that bottom tank what you refer to as a refugium? I suppose I could look it up but what is its purpose?
    Yes. So the bottom tank handles the filtration, heating, and all of that, so you don't have to have a bunch of stuff in the display tank. The water comes down via an overflow spillover, and then moves through a series of chambers separated by acrylic barriers. The first section has ceramic media for nitrifying bacteria to grow on, to metabolize the ammonia from fish waste. Since this photo, I've added a protein skimmer there as well. The central chamber has live rock and a sand bed, where additional beneficial bacteria live, and I've added in some chaetomorpha, an algae that will take up the excess nutrients that would otherwise allow algae to grow in the display tank. Then there's a return pump to send the water back up, and keep all of the water cycling. It's designed to fail gracefully; if the power cuts out, there's sufficient space below to handle the excess water since the return pump stops, but then it all starts again smoothly when power is restored. Amazingly, it all appears to be working well.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  2. #1412
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,208
    Here's a closeup of the sump tank below, with the latest additions.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PXL_20210526_144245133.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.15 MB 
ID:	26205
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  3. #1413
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    Any concerns about humidity from that rig spoiling the cabinetry?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #1414
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,208
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Any concerns about humidity from that rig spoiling the cabinetry?
    That's a sensible concern. I'll be keeping an eye on things; I tossed a cheap humidity sensor in that I'd been using over the winter to keep track of how dry the house was over the winter. It's currently reading 49% inside the cabinet, which seems within reason. Everything is covered pretty closely, because excessive evaporation is bad for the tank anyway.* This kind of set up with a sump hidden away below the display tank is pretty standard, so although I don't really know what I'm doing , I'm not breaking ground here.

    * Just the water evaporates out, leaving the salt behind, so the salinity steadily increases. Some of that is inevitable, obviously, and you compensate by occasionally topping off the system with fresh water, but it's best to try to keep it to a minimum.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  5. #1415
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    All 10 benchtops done. Today I cut 40 legs to length. Now I'm going to predrill them all. I also have to predrill the benchtops for the legs. Not a fun job as I don't have enough space to work around finished benchtops.

    When the legs are mounted into the benchtops, I'll see if everything is stiff enough. If not, I'll have to make some bracing for them. Or maybe not. As all benchtops will be bolted together, you can ask yourself how relevant a bit of play in the table as a whole is.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  6. #1416
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    How big is the room?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #1417
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,263
    I like that I don't see a handle on the front of that aquarium stand. I find simple, sleek designs like that really appealing.
    ______

    Forty boxes of flooring arrived today, along with the T-transitions and stair nosings. The latter are not as thick as the existing treads which protrude past the risers, so I'll have to cut those off. It turns out the depth of cut for my angle grinder isn't enough to get through the tread, so I have to figure out another way to do it efficiently and accurately.

    Moving to the outside of the house, the removal of sod and some subsoil for the sidewalk was completed a few days ago. I didn't know how much coarse sand I'll need to bring in to serve as a base for the bricks, so I did a bunch of measuring and created a digital elevation model comprised of a little more than 100 points over the 46 m2 area. I imported this to my GIS software and then had it calculate the volume between this surface and the planned top of the compacted sand surface, and it's about 6.2 m3. I've decided to have the sand delivered by dump truck.

  8. #1418
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    How big is the room?
    The layout will be in a section of the room of 6.70x1.90m, for a table of 6mx1.22m. But I can't do drilling or sawing in that room because of noise and dust reasons.

    I noticed the floor in the room is not flat (sounds familiar?) so I'll have to shim the legs anyway.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  9. #1419
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,263
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The layout will be in a section of the room of 6.70x1.90m, for a table of 6mx1.22m. But I can't do drilling or sawing in that room because of noise and dust reasons.

    I noticed the floor in the room is not flat (sounds familiar?) so I'll have to shim the legs anyway.
    I'm curious about the final assembly, is it a single row of ten 0.6mx1.22m tables, or two rows of five 0.61mx1.2m tables?

  10. #1420
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    Oh, good! A guy came to mow the lawn so I had him help me flip the benchtop. Now I can apply some wood filler, sand, and paint it.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #1421
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I'm curious about the final assembly, is it a single row of ten 0.6mx1.22m tables, or two rows of five 0.61mx1.2m tables?
    Single row. The layout will mainly be a large yard with a main line. In the centre there will be some smaller lines. The main line disappears into the hill o the right side of the table where it loops around to appear again on the left side. This way, the layout focusses on yard work which is my preference, but it also has "the loop" to allow a tain to run continuously on the main line. And there's more: there will be a shadow station in the hill, where you can pick another train out of sight. So seemingly random trains can appear out of the mountain while you do yard work. It will (for the moment at least) be a purely analog DC layout with insulation sections to have multiple trains working at the same time. I plan on automating some switches using an Arduino later.

    At least, that's how it is in my head. Time will tell...

    I also thought about a U shape layout instead of single row, but that makes a looping train more difficult and the angled ceiling doesn't really allow for it here.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  12. #1422
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    Just finished predrilling all bench tops so they can receive the legs. Two benchtops already have their legs, eight to go. And when I say "receive", I mean "force into submission" as it's quite the labour. 4 of the 16 screws per table are very hard to reach, and the rest of them at times requires serious force to drive in, even though everything is predrilled. But the result is as stable as you can hope for unbraced legs. Not all wood is perfectly straight, but as the floor is neither, it doesn't matter too much. Nothing a shim left and right won't fix. And the law of averages has plenty of space when bolting 10 tables together anyway.

    Meanwhile, the hardware for my illusive turntable (not the railroad kind) project has arrived, so as soon as the benchwork is settling down, I'll start on that one. I'm not looking forward to the combination of metalwork, clean, huge precision.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  13. #1423
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    Having got the workbench top flipped, I've spent a couple days applying filler to the imperfections and sanding it smooth. Final sanding was just a little bit ago so I went on and applied a coat of paint. That should have been "final sanding before paint", of course, because as expected the paint REALLY shows up the spots where the filler was insufficiently sanded or needed to be applied but wasn't. I'll let it dry thoroughly before proceeding.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #1424
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    What kind of work do you plan to do on the workbench that such a smooth finish is warranted? I mean, after I've dragged a gearbox over my workbench it looks so "reliced" that any prior finish would have become utterly irrelevant.

    Meanwhile I've put legs in 7 of the 10 railroad modules. My own front legs are a bit worn out now.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  15. #1425
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    This is not so much a "working" bench, as a flat space in the garage that my wife can use. I hope not to be dragging things over it! But I'm going overboard anyhow.
    Later I'll do a couple of more workaday benches down in the old garage. If I can afford or even find the lumber, which is sky-high right now.

    ETA: Note also that any time spent assembling, filling, sanding, painting, repeat as required, is not spent drinking wine and eating snacks while watching YouTube videos. That's a good thing.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2021-May-31 at 06:27 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #1426
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    I've heard about wood being very expensive in the USA right now. I haven't really noticed that overhere. But still I'm lucky that quite some wood for my train benchwork came from leftovers from building the house.

    Speaking of: last leg of the benchwork going in!
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #1427
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    There. The basic benchwork is done. That excludes the storage space I want to make on the front side, or any height differences/faceplates/backdrops. I'm still thinking whether I would make faceplates between each module or not. If it were a truly mobile setup I'd certainly do so, but this layout would only ever be moved if we'd sell the house.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #1428
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    There. The basic benchwork is done. That excludes the storage space I want to make on the front side, or any height differences/faceplates/backdrops. I'm still thinking whether I would make faceplates between each module or not. If it were a truly mobile setup I'd certainly do so, but this layout would only ever be moved if we'd sell the house.
    You'll be providing us with pictures, of course.
    Today I did more filler and more sanding. And measured the spacing of the crossmembers so I could work out the precise spacing for attaching the legs to the wall. Except I measured at the front of the benchtop, away from the wall where it really matters. I'd like to think the measurements will be the same at both ends, but I'm going to re-measure at the back anyhow. Tomorrow. And maybe do some more paint.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #1429
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    THere may be pictures. But not before at least the storage space is made.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  20. #1430
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,441
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I've heard about wood being very expensive in the USA right now.
    Yes, it seems to be, even in the Pacific Northwest where we have a large lumber industry.

  21. #1431
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,697
    I needed a bolt for my car. It holds the brake calipers on, so its rather important. I went to the store with a bolt from the other side of the car in hand. I used the sizing chart and gauge to make sure I had the right part. The bolt fit in both the 3/8 inch and m10 hold.

    Uh-oh. 3/8 should be about 9.5 mm, so that shouldn't happen. On closer inspection, there was fine metal shavings under the gauge. No wonder...

    You know what I did? I bought two giant packs of bolts in a variety of sizes in both metric and SAE. 20 bucks is worth my safety and sanity.
    Solfe

  22. #1432
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    Work table progress: Another coat of paint on the top. One more should do it. I also put some paint on a couple of support pieces that'll never be seen, and one that will.
    In the "Is anyone else this lazy?" department, instead of cleaning the paint brush every time, I wrap it tightly in aluminum foil. Works pretty well. Even for a couple of days.
    Tomorrow I'm going to have to face what I'm putting off: Attach the legs to the wall, spacing them correctly to match the crossmembers on the top, to which they'll be screwed.
    Or not. The world will not end if that doesn't get done tomorrow.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #1433
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I needed a bolt for my car. It holds the brake calipers on, so its rather important. I went to the store with a bolt from the other side of the car in hand. I used the sizing chart and gauge to make sure I had the right part. The bolt fit in both the 3/8 inch and m10 hold.

    Uh-oh. 3/8 should be about 9.5 mm, so that shouldn't happen. On closer inspection, there was fine metal shavings under the gauge. No wonder...

    You know what I did? I bought two giant packs of bolts in a variety of sizes in both metric and SAE. 20 bucks is worth my safety and sanity.
    A liile care! Those are critical bolts , they get hot etc. If the manufacturer part is not available I would use a good stainless alternative. Mild steel bolts probably not a good idea although they are tough. A big bag of bolts may not be very high specification steel.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  24. #1434
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,697
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    A liile care! Those are critical bolts , they get hot etc. If the manufacturer part is not available I would use a good stainless alternative. Mild steel bolts probably not a good idea although they are tough. A big bag of bolts may not be very high specification steel.
    Oh, lord no. It wasn't a bag a bolts. I have bags a bolts and that didn't seem like it would do. It was two sets of bolts specifically made for the application. It was a mechanic's pack. Sets of 4 bolts of multiple sizes meant for brake calipers.

    I have 8 sets in metric (now 7) and SAE. The SAE are useless for my car, but I could probable fix a few other things with them, like chairs and such around the house. They were actually $20 for each, I should return one but I'm sort of shy about returning tools and bolts once they are open. Especially car parts.
    Solfe

  25. #1435
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Oh, lord no. It wasn't a bag a bolts. I have bags a bolts and that didn't seem like it would do. It was two sets of bolts specifically made for the application. It was a mechanic's pack. Sets of 4 bolts of multiple sizes meant for brake calipers.

    I have 8 sets in metric (now 7) and SAE. The SAE are useless for my car, but I could probable fix a few other things with them, like chairs and such around the house. They were actually $20 for each, I should return one but I'm sort of shy about returning tools and bolts once they are open. Especially car parts.
    Thanks, that is a relief! So I guess the bag is for replacing all four calipers’ bolts? Twice?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  26. #1436
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,697
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Thanks, that is a relief! So I guess the bag is for replacing all four calipers’ bolts? Twice?
    I think they are arranged 8 sizes, 4 bolt each. These are the bracket bolts, so depending on your car you might have 2 or 3 bolts per caliper. My front brakes have 3 and the back have two, each side. I guess if you had a bad job, you'd need two sets and end up with a lot of extras.

    If I bought new calipers, they have all the bolts right in the set. So this set is fine for someone like me that dropped a bolt and can't find it. I know where it is, its in a crack in the driveway and I'm not getting it back without a jackhammer. I can't even figure out how it fit in that space.
    Solfe

  27. #1437
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,441
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    ... In the "Is anyone else this lazy?" department, instead of cleaning the paint brush every time, I wrap it tightly in aluminum foil. Works pretty well. Even for a couple of days....
    For repetitive painting, I still clean the brush but maybe not as thoroughly as if I were putting it away until the next project. Never used aluminum foil though - I normally wrap it in a wet rag and leave it in the utility room sink. Maybe not the best practice.

  28. #1438
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,315
    I think I need to rebuild one of my leg assemblies. Spacing is just wrong. I made the two legs opposite hand, for no good reason as it turns out. Now I need to remake one of them so they are the same.
    But the top looks good!

    ETA: I almost disassembled the wrong one. But I didn't, so that's ok!
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2021-Jun-02 at 07:13 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #1439
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    So many posts about brake caliper bolts and not once is the strength as indicated on the bolts mentioned. As you've bought bolts specifically made for that job, I assume they are the right strength. 10.9, 8.8 or whatever your car demands. Anything below 8.8 would be VERY suspicious.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  30. #1440
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,452
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I think I need to rebuild one of my leg assemblies. Spacing is just wrong. I made the two legs opposite hand, for no good reason as it turns out. Now I need to remake one of them so they are the same.
    But the top looks good!

    ETA: I almost disassembled the wrong one. But I didn't, so that's ok!
    I'm not blaming you. Just don't ask me why one of the legs in my benchwork has 5 holes for 2 screws.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

Similar Threads

  1. VA Hospital Adventures
    By BigDon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 2012-Apr-24, 06:24 PM
  2. Adventures of Mr. X in the Marketing World
    By a1call in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 2010-Oct-09, 08:59 PM
  3. Scotch Mount Adventures
    By drlit in forum Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2009-Apr-20, 05:50 PM
  4. Motorcycle Adventures
    By crosscountry in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 2006-Feb-27, 02:52 AM
  5. Adventures in Woo-Woo Land
    By jaeger in forum Against the Mainstream
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2004-Mar-29, 05:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •