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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1501
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I have a power strip in the back corner of each end of the bench. They fit well enough there that I don't feel the need to mount them. I have quite a collection hanging on the gray shelves and an even larger collection of extension cords on the other end. This is what happens when you consolidate two houses, plus two parents' houses, into one! So naturally I went out and bought the two new ones for the bench, because they were nice and white and had 90 degree plugs.
    Fair enough. I just find it easier with the strip mounted - it's a one-handed operation to unplug something.

    Good job on finishing it though! It obviously was needed!

  2. #1502
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    That's a good point. Perhaps I'll stick a screw or two into the bench where they are.

    This week I'll start on fixing up the old garage. The long-term plan is to convert the old shop and laundry room (from when it was attached to the former mobile home) into storage and build two new benches the size of the one in the new garage along the west wall, with space for some of the power tools. The first step, however, is going to be simply clearing out all the accumulation of stuff -- especially cardboard boxes, that is currently littering it. Then I can park my truck in there.
    Until a couple of months ago, I couldn't get the truck in anyway because of the presence of the trailer-mounted catapult. It's nominally a two-car garage, and we have indeed had two cars in it, but you couldn't open the doors one one of them, and had to kind of walk sideways to get between. But last week I disassembled the catapult for the first time in a few years, stowed the wooden bits in the shed, and leaned the little trailer against the retaining wall. Made me kind of sad.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #1503
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    Looks good, Treb. I know what you mean by those grey shelves being limber. I have a 58" (147 cm) tall version of that for keeping shoes and other light items. I'm glad it's not any taller.

    I've been painting. A long time ago Brett suggested using Benjamin Moore's "Advance" line of paint for something I'd built, because it is so tough. The local store that sells this brand and from which I buy most of my paint recently changed hands and the new owner decided to briefly close while remodeling the store. That took almost two months (supply chains of course)! I like to buy from local stores, otherwise we'll lose them, so I waited and did other things. Anyway, I bought the paint and the requisite primer to finish the risers for my stairs. I had precut them from MDF to slightly larger than the finished size and had them all laid out on sawhorses. After the second coat had dried I marveled at how uniform and good the finish looks. I'm letting it harden a full five days before I install them. I also need to get my 80-tooth 10" finish blade sharpened before doing that. Using it to cut the laminate flooring really beat up the teeth.

    I'm also painting the many pieces of trim intended for the doors. That is tedious. But I'm looking forward to having it out of my garage.

  4. #1504
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    Not a huge DIY project but I decided to refinish the front door now instead of waiting five years past when it should have been done, as is my typical MO.

  5. #1505
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    Hmm. I put up some shelves, I made a workbench, I made a coat rack, I put up more shelves, I made another coat rack. I need another project.
    The obvious one is to get busy cleaning and fixing the old garage, but I'm having difficulty getting motivated for it. Perhaps you guys can help.

    This garage was originally attached to the mobile home, now gone, but was structurally independent so we were able to have the mobile removed and add a fourth wall to the garage. It's about 20x36 feet exterior dimension. Inside one end is divided into two separate rooms, the former laundry room and a workshop.
    My dream scheme has been to build a new workshop area along the new wall of the garage and dedicate the old shop and laundry to storage. The shop area would consist of two eight-foot benches, constructed much like the one in the new garage, and a space between for a sit-down disk. (I've got the desk; in fact I've had it 60 years!) Power tools which could get mounted to one of the benches would include the drill press, band saw, router table, and grinder. (None of these are large ones.) The chop saw has its own stand. The most used of these, by far, is the drill press. I'd also want to mount a vise.

    Any suggestions? How should I set things up? Make holes to mount whichever tool I'm using and store the others underneath? Maybe I can devise some sort of quick-change system.

    Note that at this time of year I SHOULD be frantically getting catapults ready to go. But I'm not.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #1506
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    A nice dilemma to have. My initial thought is to concentrate on the table saw. Do you have the saw you want or will you be buying a new one? In either case, design the shop layout around the saw. My second thought is dust collection. Think about where the dust collector will be and how you'll use it. Will it be mobile (mine is but doesn't actually get moved much) or stationary. Third thought - and this one can be a project - you will want a medium duty bench with integral wood vises. Build one. I bought mine but it easily could have been built in my shop, I just had other things going on at the time.

  7. #1507
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    Don't have a table saw. I probably never will, because they terrify me! This is not going to be such a serious shop that I need serious dust collection. I may (or may not) just adapt the shop vac to the dust ports on various tools. No two of which are the same size, of course.

    I'm probably insufficiently skilled to do the integral vise but will look into it!

    The first stage of the project needs to be just clearing out all the mess down there. I'll also start to develop some plans and make an approximate bill of material so I can get quotes from the lumber places. Lumber is really expensive around here lately! That project in the upper garage was about $300!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #1508
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    In that case, you might consider a large central work table. Along with the vise-equipped bench which sits to the side, my shop is dominated by a 4 ft x 4 ft table topped with two 5/8" MDF panels (which are screwed in and can be replaced when they get too damaged). The table is higher than most - 37 inches - so I don't have to bend over as much. 90% of project work gets done on this table, which also has a shelf below the top for ready tool storage. If I had more room in the shop, I'd have built it with three 2x4 panels instead of two.

  9. #1509
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    It needs to be linear, I'm afraid, so that I can park my truck in there. Again, this is not all that serious a shop.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #1510
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    When I built the workbench at one end of my garage it ensured that I'd never be able to fit a full size, extended-cab pickup in there again. I've never thought of that as a problem!

    I've put up the door casing everywhere the new flooring has been installed. The last time I did this sort of thing I bought an air nailer and used my friend's compressor. That was six years ago. That compressor went to his son after he died, so I bought a new one.

    The next step is to finally install the new flooring on the stairs. But there is still some drywall compound and paint to apply where the drywall had been carved out to accommodate the previous stair nosing in yet another ill-conceived choice made by the original builder.

    A friend of mine sharpened my good 10" blade so I'm ready to start cutting the risers and laminate. Man, that laminate is hard on carbide! And when that's done I'll install the handrail I ordered in February, which was the seed for this entire renovation.

  11. #1511
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    My truck is only a compact one, 2005 Ford Ranger. I have no need or desire for a bigger one. I'm thinking of replacing both the truck and 2011 RAV4 with a newer, nicer truck. It just needs to have a six foot bed and two, not four doors.
    In the stuff I don't get department are enormous pickups with four doors and about a four foot bed.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #1512
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My truck is only a compact one, 2005 Ford Ranger. I have no need or desire for a bigger one. I'm thinking of replacing both the truck and 2011 RAV4 with a newer, nicer truck. It just needs to have a six foot bed and two, not four doors.
    Odd twist in the truck market in the last several years: they quit making single-cab light trucks; it's only crew-cab or extended-cab now, so the shortest cab you can get is the one they call "extended". (This made one less wheelbase & frame length for them to need to think about manufacturing.) And since then, even in full-size trucks, Toyota and Nissan have dropped the single cab entirely, and Chevy has made it available only with an extra-long bed (again presumably the same wheelbase & frame as another version with a shorter bed & longer cab). Only Ford is left still making single cabs with normal beds. And the new Silverados' extended cab with the half-size second doors has those doors attached at the front now instead of the back! Among Fords, a single-cab F-150 has slightly less length than an extended-cab Ranger (the shortest new Ranger that exists), but more height & width.

    If I'd been ordering my new truck made for me and had the choice, I would have gone for a single cab. But, now that I have one with an extended cab (with the extra half-doors attached the proper way, at the back, of course), and have been using it for about a year & a half, I actually like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    In the stuff I don't get department are enormous pickups with four doors and about a four foot bed.
    If I were paying for the back seats anyway, I'd get an SUV (and take out the back seats so more of the space under the roof is usable. But Chevy had an interesting solution with the Avalanche several years ago: the back seats and the walls & windows around them could be removed or somehow folded & tucked out of the way to make that part of the truck essentially a forward extension of the bed... or you could say it had a long bed in which you could enclose the front part of it and put seats there. I'm still a bit surprised that that hasn't caught on since then. With that conversion option, you're never stuck with just one or the other (long bed but no back seats, or back seats but not such a long bed). It's right up there with my PT Cruiser's completely removable rear seats as "things that I would have thought would be industry standards by now but have been abandoned instead".

    * * *

    I just got back inside from checking out my own truck's bed. I was planning to remove the liner so I could get started on the floor & sides of whatever I was going to build for myself, then bring that starting point inside to add to it slowly & gradually over the winter while also making up my mind about the final design. Then I found out that the liner isn't removable. I thought it was a drop-in, but it turns out to be some kind of hybrid of drop-in and spray-on: as thick and rigid and independently shaped as a drop-in liner but with spray-on-liner stuff under at least the edge areas to make it about as sticky as a fully spray-on liner. I'll need to detach the storage boxes and folding tonneau cover just get close enough look at all parts of the liner to see what I'd be getting myself into trying to get rid of it.

  13. #1513
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    I almost put this in the "amuses" thread.

    I've installed almost all of the ~95' (~29 m) of new baseboard to go with the new flooring. I pre-measured all the lengths and worked out how to cut them from the 14' lengths with the least waste.

    The 80:20 rule of thumb, wherein 20% of "something" requires 80% of the effort, 80% of the fish caught are by 20% of the fishers, and so on, also seems to apply to this task.

    The first half of the pieces (by length installed) seemed to take no time. But each of the numerous short pieces takes just as much time to measure and cut, and only slightly less time to install than the long pieces, and so I realized this is probably another example of this rule.

  14. #1514
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    Trebucet's rule of projects:
    The first 90% of the project takes 90% of the time.
    The last 10% of the project takes the other 90% of the time.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #1515
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    Recognizable. I have made it very clear to my wife that when I say I'll finish a project, I WILL finish that project and she doesn't have to remind me every two years.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  16. #1516
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Trebucet's rule of projects:
    The first 90% of the project takes 90% of the time.
    The last 10% of the project takes the other 90% of the time.
    That reminds me of the 50/50/90 rule: if I have a 50% chance of being right, I'll be wrong 90% of the time.

  17. #1517
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    I'm contemplating building a TARDIS, full scale. I need a project.

    https://woodworkingformeremortals.co...ur-own-tardis/

  18. #1518
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I'm contemplating building a TARDIS, full scale. I need a project.

    https://woodworkingformeremortals.co...ur-own-tardis/
    The interior materials are going to ruin you.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  19. #1519
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    The interior materials are going to ruin you.
    Hadn't considered that. I suppose I could get it barely functional and go back in time a few years to buy Amazon stock.

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