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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1261
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    I tend to ponder a project for days at a time, only imagining what it might look like, how the wood will be joined, etc., before sketching it on paper. I've used Sketchup a couple of times, thanks to this thread. I took drafting courses in high school, and still really enjoy using pencil and paper for making a plan, sometimes giving it the full orthogonal treatment.

    This thread also has me thinking I should get a jig for making box joints and a screw jack lift (or whatever it's called) for the router. Both would really useful.

    The box looks good Brett. And I like the practical way for ensuring the lid and bottom will be aligned.

    That table looks like it'll be solid, geonuc. That white oak looks beautiful.

    Which reminds me of a time in 1982, traveling on my motorcycle, I stopped for fuel in Clarksville, Tennessee and ended up talking with a trucker who was hauling a load of white oak logs to Newport News, Virginia, over 700 miles away! It must've been very valuable to haul so far.

    I did a second wipe-on of tung oil finish to the table, and I'm really pleased with how it looks. It's possibly the nicest looking finish I've applied. Here's what it looked like minutes after the first application.


    And a few days after the second application it doesn't look glossy, but more subtle and it seems like the colour comes from within, but this photo doesn't do it justice.


    This is not the intended location for it, it's just convenient for photography. It may end up against a less busy wall in a bedroom rather than the hall, where the cold air return vent, an electrical outlet, thermostat, and watercooler all detract from its appearance.

    ETA: And this post admits me to the order. Only took 19.5 years.
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    Last edited by Torsten; 2021-Mar-21 at 07:29 PM.

  2. #1262
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    Very nice, Torsten!

    I thought you already were a member.

  3. #1263
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    This thread also has me thinking I should get a jig for making box joints and a screw jack lift (or whatever it's called) for the router. Both would really useful.
    Do it! I don't know why I waited so long to buy a router lift. They aren't particularly cheap but given how much the router table gets used, well worth it. I bought a Rockler box joint jig, but as I mentioned earlier, I haven't really had a chance to use it much. It seems to be good quality.

  4. #1264
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    I put in a raised bed in the backyard. I realized my younger two have never swung a hammer, so I dragged them into it. Nothing special. Found pine boards from a project I never started, plus a two by four to make stakes. Ironically, I had the kids measure the 2x4 we cut into stakes but not the pine boards. We just cut them in half, so they were what they were. The whole thing is 4' by 8' by 8". I want to make it an even foot tall, so I need a couple more boards.

    Once the soil and mulch is in, we're gonna put in a central rail about 4 feet high so I have something drape the chicken wire over. Then a splash of paint. That will require some measuring and more help from the kids. We have to paint it as I'm trying to cure a black thumb but also have to recognise that everything I put in it might die quickly. I'm hoping a nice paint job will get me a pass on actually gardening.
    Solfe

  5. #1265
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    I bought a turntable the previous owner DIY'ed by mounting an existing drive&platter and two tonearms on a slab of wood. If you want to know how many degrees of freedom this system has, just count all his mistakes:
    -the tonearms are mounted too high compared to the platter
    -the X and Y position of both tonearms is wrong
    -the base orientation of both tonearms is wrong
    -the vertical tonearm bearings are badly adjusted
    -the counterweights of both tonearms are outside the reach of the chosen headshells
    -both tonearms miss the lateral balance weight.

    I only discovered this after I had bought the table. Sigh. Anyway, I started this project now. So far:
    -both tonearm bearings are adjusted
    -I turned a pair of brass lateral balance weights with locknuts on the lathe
    -I turned stainless steel counterweights of different mass with locknuts on the lathe.

    So far, so good. The brass was a scrap water faucet, and it had some voids. But it's good enough. I polished all weights after turning them, and they look nice. The locknuts are M3, so that was some miniature manufacturing.

    Next is a bigger challenge: either make a completely new base for the components, or find a way to save the current slab. In either case I'd like to make separate armboards on lockable slides so you can adjust for any tonearm mounting distance (I have a collection of tonearms).
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  6. #1266
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    Interesting turntable. Why two tonearms? So you can play 2 songs at once? LOL... or I'm guessing, so you can use different cartridges without swapping them. Just wondering. I'm an audio nut myself and have a turntable (Denon DP-300F with Ortifon Red cart). Sounds nice for the money, but I don't use it very often.

  7. #1267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I love the detailed rendition of this box, and am really interested to see how that sliver thin wedge on each top corner of the lid turns out.
    It won't be a knife edge. I don't want to risk sanding through it or have some chip off later. I'm leaving about 1/32" of that finger and I'll gradually ease it over to minimize its appearance. Here's today's progress:

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    First order of business was to flush up the joints. I started by setting up a flush-trim fence to take the protruding joints down to almost flush then finished with the ROS. I then decided to simplify the design and reduce the overall height a little by eliminating the curved bottom detail. I just wasn't feeling it. Next, I laid out the lid profile, cut it at the band saw, and finish up with some hand sanding to 100g to call it a day.

    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I was trained in orthogonal technical drawing and I still think like that. I use sketchup too but prefer to think in projections. Today any 3d view is expected, people just don’t read orthogonal views any more, it is like a lost language. The link to producing things has gone with it.
    I learned mechanical drawing (with a dash of architectural drafting) in high school. That's also the class that taught me to use a slide rule.

    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    This thread also has me thinking I should get a jig for making box joints and a screw jack lift (or whatever it's called) for the router. Both would really useful.
    I can recommend mine, the Mast-R-Lift II from Jessum. However, I'd go with the Incra version for the MagnaLock inserts. I retrofitted mine with the Incra plate and wish I'd had it from day one.

    I did a second wipe-on of tung oil finish to the table, and I'm really pleased with how it looks. It's possibly the nicest looking finish I've applied. Here's what it looked like minutes after the first application.

    Brilliant design! Nicely done!
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  8. #1268
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Once the soil and mulch is in, we're gonna put in a central rail about 4 feet high so I have something drape the chicken wire over.
    Will the soil surface be much lower than the side of the box, or will you keep low plants around the perimeter? Or add short posts along the long side? I'm wondering whether the chicken wire will interfere with the plants along the side.

    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Interesting turntable. Why two tonearms? So you can play 2 songs at once? LOL... or I'm guessing, so you can use different cartridges without swapping them. Just wondering. I'm an audio nut myself and have a turntable (Denon DP-300F with Ortifon Red cart). Sounds nice for the money, but I don't use it very often.
    I have the same question about two tonearms.

    My ~42 year old turntable sits in storage. At the age of one and a half, my firstborn got ahold of it and destroyed the cartridge, about 31 years ago. CDs were the rage, all my vinyl had been taped, so away it went, but I couldn't bring myself to chuck it.

  9. #1269
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    It won't be a knife edge. I don't want to risk sanding through it or have some chip off later. I'm leaving about 1/32" of that finger and I'll gradually ease it over to minimize its appearance. Here's today's progress:

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    Very nice. That 1/32 tip is much lower risk and looks good too.

    That's also the class that taught me to use a slide rule.
    My dad gave me his and taught me how to use them. We were using calculators in school for the chemistry and physics problems, but I was writing the provincial scholarship exams that year, and calculators were not allowed. The government seemed to think that they were out of financial reach for too many students, but slide rules weren't, or something. So for practice I used the slide rule where appropriate for classwork calculations.

    I can recommend mine, the Mast-R-Lift II from Jessum. However, I'd go with the Incra version for the MagnaLock inserts. I retrofitted mine with the Incra plate and wish I'd had it from day one.
    Thanks for this.


    Brilliant design!

    Nicely done!
    And thanks for the tung oil wipe on varnish suggestion. I used Minwax's product because that's what they had at the store.

  10. #1270
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    Why two tonearms you ask? Well, it's worse. Three tonearms and counting. I'll be using swappable armboards. But the turntable will be able to accomodate two tonearms at once. In my case this is because I want to be able to swap quickly between my "daily" cartridge (the cheap one, unless you ask my wife) and the "special occasions" cartridge (if it were a car, it would be a Koenig modified Ferrari). The third tonearm will have a really cheap cartridge just to test eg newly acquired old records. Other people use two tonearms because they have a regular cartridge and one specifically for old mono records. Or the particularly particular people have one which is best suited for blues, and another one better suited for jazz. I'm not one of those people.

    I'm currently trying to work out a turntable design in Autocad. A main hurdle is being able to construct it. One of my designs would use a wooden slab, but I'd have to able to make nicely rectangular slots in it and I don't know how I can do that. WHen using a jigsaw in thick wood, the blade tends to warp creating cuts which are not straight vertically.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  11. #1271
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Why two tonearms you ask? ...
    I had no idea that anyone would prefer cartridges for different situations.


    I bought my house in 2002 knowing there was at least one important deficiency that should never have passed inspection, but that I could easily fix. However, I never got around to it until now...

    It needs a handrail for the stairs, which consist of a lower flight of 14 risers to a small intermediate landing, then a left turn and 5 more risers to the upper floor. A banister runs along a short hallway parallel to this landing and the upper flight, ending in a newel post at the top of the stairs. So the handrail should be in the same style as the handrail on the exsting banister, oak with a fairly common profile. Simple enough.

    I made measurements and ordered the elbow and two handrails. The turned part of the newel post and the wall height at the landing limit where I can attach the handrail to a range of just one inch. This then sets the height for the lower flight. But there was a big problem for any code-permissible handrail height. The light switch at the bottom was not located at the lower landing, but above the first stair tread, so that the handrail would obscure it. I fumed for while, then got out my density and magnetic stud finders and mapped the insides of the wall and the fasteners. Fortunately, there was plenty of extra wire inside the box to allow a diagonal move if I fit a short piece of 2x4 to the adjacent stud and attached the box to that. I could even staple the wire to the new stud within the required distance to meet that part of our code.

    The drywall was removed as a rectangular piece, rotated 180 degrees, and reattached as in the picture. The downstairs reno I did six years ago is finally expanding upstairs. Besides painting that wall, I'm planning to remove the carpet and replace with wood, and also replace the upstairs flooring. Not looking forward to the treads part, but now's the time.

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  12. #1272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I'm currently trying to work out a turntable design in Autocad. A main hurdle is being able to construct it. One of my designs would use a wooden slab, but I'd have to able to make nicely rectangular slots in it and I don't know how I can do that. WHen using a jigsaw in thick wood, the blade tends to warp creating cuts which are not straight vertically.
    If you have a router, I'd recommend using templates and either pattern routing bits or standard bits and guide bushings. Do these slots have to completely penetrate the slab? If so, you can still use your jigsaw to rough cut within your layout lines and finish with the router/template. If your slab is very thick (more than 2 inches) you'll also want a top bearing flush trim bit to finish up from the other side of the slab.

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    Pattern bit
    Flush trim bit
    Guide bushing

    The pattern can be cut into sheet stock but simple, rectangular patterns can be made from four narrower pieces. In the first photo below, I used two template pieces to set the desired width and height of the mortise and sandwiched between the other two pieces...all fixed with double-face tape. In the second image, I used longer pieces arranged in an end-to-edge pattern and as shown here, I arranged the around the item I needed to recess. I used pattern bits in both cases. When guide bushings are used, the pattern must by oversized by the difference between the guide bushing and router bit radii.


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  13. #1273
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    Thanks for the input! I have a router. No router table, but with the pattern that shouldn't be an issue. I'll have to check whether I have the right bits once the design is finished. I have straight bits, I have pattern bits (those with a bearing on them) but I'm not sure I have straight pattern bits.

    This method would also result in rounded corners, but I can't think of a method of squaring them up precisely. At least not with the tools I currently have. Come to think of it, this is not necessarily an issue if I'd give the armboards a similar rounding. But that's an outside corner, so now I have to think how I'd best do that. Maybe just hold them against the vertical sander after I've marked the radius.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  14. #1274
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    You guys make me ashamed of my minimal skills. I don't do woodworking. You can barely call it carpentry.
    Anyhow, I'm still trying to figure out how to do the "work surface" in the garage. I want to attach the supports to the wall, but based on locations of the drywall screws the stud spacing seemed all weird. It took me a couple of days to figure out that there's a jog in the house footprint so that the garage is a couple of feet wider than the next room. Ok, that accounted for some of it. So today, I went back and looked at old photos during construction. Oh. There's half-inch OSB under the drywall, all across that wall. Because, according to code I suppose, it's an exterior wall. So the drywall hangers didn't much care where they put the screws.
    Therefore, I'm not going to care all that much where I attach bench either!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #1275
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Thanks for the input! I have a router. No router table, but with the pattern that shouldn't be an issue. I'll have to check whether I have the right bits once the design is finished. I have straight bits, I have pattern bits (those with a bearing on them) but I'm not sure I have straight pattern bits.
    You can use straight bits, shear bits, or the newer compound bits as long it's a top bearing bit.

    This method would also result in rounded corners, but I can't think of a method of squaring them up precisely. At least not with the tools I currently have. Come to think of it, this is not necessarily an issue if I'd give the armboards a similar rounding. But that's an outside corner, so now I have to think how I'd best do that. Maybe just hold them against the vertical sander after I've marked the radius.
    If you do want square corners, it's certainly doable with a sharp chisel, patience, and some practice. Referring again to an example I posted in my previous post, I squared the corners after pattern routing.

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    For context, these are two legs from a wine rack that are clamped face to face, so the required eight recesses can be made with four router operations. Here's the end state:

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    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2021-Apr-08 at 10:13 PM. Reason: minor sp, formatting
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  16. #1276
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    From my happy shop time today...

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    I finished all but the final hand sanding, then separated the lid, and sanded the sawn edges on an MDF platten. The putty knives? I inserted them in the lid panel's expansion relief joint so I could apply boiled linseed oil to it...and not the maple. The BLO will make the maple warmer than I want for this project but it sure makes the lacewood pop.

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    Next up, the box innards.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  17. #1277
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You guys make me ashamed of my minimal skills. I don't do woodworking. You can barely call it carpentry.
    Anyhow, I'm still trying to figure out how to do the "work surface" in the garage. I want to attach the supports to the wall, but based on locations of the drywall screws the stud spacing seemed all weird. It took me a couple of days to figure out that there's a jog in the house footprint so that the garage is a couple of feet wider than the next room. Ok, that accounted for some of it. So today, I went back and looked at old photos during construction. Oh. There's half-inch OSB under the drywall, all across that wall. Because, according to code I suppose, it's an exterior wall. So the drywall hangers didn't much care where they put the screws.
    Therefore, I'm not going to care all that much where I attach bench either!
    Yeah, that helps with mounting stuff to the wall, for sure.

  18. #1278
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You guys make me ashamed of my minimal skills. I don't do woodworking. You can barely call it carpentry.
    Anyhow, I'm still trying to figure out how to do the "work surface" in the garage. I want to attach the supports to the wall, but based on locations of the drywall screws the stud spacing seemed all weird. It took me a couple of days to figure out that there's a jog in the house footprint so that the garage is a couple of feet wider than the next room. Ok, that accounted for some of it. So today, I went back and looked at old photos during construction. Oh. There's half-inch OSB under the drywall, all across that wall. Because, according to code I suppose, it's an exterior wall. So the drywall hangers didn't much care where they put the screws.
    Therefore, I'm not going to care all that much where I attach bench either!
    I wouldn't think of the garage shop as complete without a workbench along a wall. It's the first thing I built here, about a week after I moved in. It's rough, unfinished and overbuilt, so I can hammer hard on things without it complaining.

    So I pulled the carpet on the lower flight. (Oh, and it's nine risers there, and five on the next flight, for a total of 14. This project already has me flustered.) I knew the fellow who built it had the nosing wrong. Our code stipulates a maximum of 14 mm projection, and these were 25. That's because he attached the risers to the stringers first, and then the treads. And that last rise to the landing is shorter than the previous one by 10 mm, twice the legal maximum here.

    Okay, now I'm going to relax for the evening.

  19. #1279
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    From my happy shop time today...
    I love the crisp precision of those joints and the striking contrast between the species.

  20. #1280
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You guys make me ashamed of my minimal skills. I don't do woodworking. You can barely call it carpentry.
    Anyhow, I'm still trying to figure out how to do the "work surface" in the garage. I want to attach the supports to the wall, but based on locations of the drywall screws the stud spacing seemed all weird. It took me a couple of days to figure out that there's a jog in the house footprint so that the garage is a couple of feet wider than the next room. Ok, that accounted for some of it. So today, I went back and looked at old photos during construction. Oh. There's half-inch OSB under the drywall, all across that wall. Because, according to code I suppose, it's an exterior wall. So the drywall hangers didn't much care where they put the screws.
    Therefore, I'm not going to care all that much where I attach bench either!
    I guess that is one of the advantages of living in a 'double brick' house. If you want to mount something to a wall - you just decide where you want to put it and you drill a hole and tap in a rawlplug.

  21. #1281
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Will the soil surface be much lower than the side of the box, or will you keep low plants around the perimeter? Or add short posts along the long side? I'm wondering whether the chicken wire will interfere with the plants along the side.
    At the moment, I have 18 cucumber plants under the lights getting ready for planting. We are making a basket like trellis for them to climb which will go under the chicken wire. The basket trellises are made of lilac branches I collected last year. This is my first time out, so if they grow all the way to the chicken wire, I'll be happy to deal with that problem. If I have to, I'll add another pair of rails to the edges so the chicken wire will form a 4 foot high box. If these things get that high, I will consider it a major win.

    As far as future plans, I have some peppers to go around the perimeter, but it looks like only five plants will make it. We'll see if I can get another round of them growing. The arrowroot tree is coming along nicely and I am starting the thin out the lilacs and roses. There is a minor war between the roses and the lilacs, some of them are 10 feet tall, so I trimmed them back to say under the eaves of the house.

    I purchased a tiny unicorn sculpture for the lilacs. She is about 18" tall. Peter Beagle's The Last Unicorn starts with the line: "The unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone...." Ours won't be alone. She is actually pretty good about scaring the deer off. For the last few years they've been nesting under them. One day, I stumbled on 5 or six of them. I know deer are not exactly large, the buck's antlers where way over my head. I'd like to avoid being a newspaper report.

    Last summer, we played a lot of games outside. D&D, En Garde, Risk and Monopoly. All we had was the neighbor's fence as a backdrop. I've dubbed this "The Gaming Garden" and I just need it to be as tall as a sitting person. I hope to do weekly updates on my blog, with a post on the game and then a second on the plants. That's the plan anyway,
    Solfe

  22. #1282
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    @PetersCreek that chisel looks more shiny than my wedding ring. When I use a chisel on wood, the result is a mashed mess. But you're giving me good ideas of how it can be done, or alternatively what it would take but I can't do so I should design around.

    Meanwhile I first have to solve a design issue where my slide rails collide with the base of one of the tonearms, so I'll be back later.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  23. #1283
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Why two tonearms you ask? Well, it's worse. Three tonearms and counting. I'll be using swappable armboards. But the turntable will be able to accomodate two tonearms at once. In my case this is because I want to be able to swap quickly between my "daily" cartridge (the cheap one, unless you ask my wife) and the "special occasions" cartridge (if it were a car, it would be a Koenig modified Ferrari). The third tonearm will have a really cheap cartridge just to test eg newly acquired old records. Other people use two tonearms because they have a regular cartridge and one specifically for old mono records. Or the particularly particular people have one which is best suited for blues, and another one better suited for jazz. I'm not one of those people.

    I'm currently trying to work out a turntable design in Autocad. A main hurdle is being able to construct it. One of my designs would use a wooden slab, but I'd have to able to make nicely rectangular slots in it and I don't know how I can do that. WHen using a jigsaw in thick wood, the blade tends to warp creating cuts which are not straight vertically.
    In a past life I designed turntables for vinyls. I suggest you need just one good, ie very light low mass needle or even these days a laser. All needles rip out the high frequencies first time around so keeping a heavier one for checking is bad practice. Your good cartridge will not get damaged by the vinyl. Go slowly with a full width new jigsaw blade, and it will stay straight. For tight corners take the extra time to work towards them with long cuts, not trying to cut slivers. Store vinyls horizontally, otherwise good luck with your project.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  24. #1284
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,143
    I'm not going to have a huge discussion here, but there are pros and cons to storing vinyl horizontally and vertically. But we'll agree that storing them at 45į is not exactly "best of both worlds". My "checking" cartridge is no disco 7gram plough but still a gentle 1.5-2g decent unit. Only to be used on newly acquired old vinyl with questionable dirt or scratches. My daily cartridge is a 1.5g and my special occasions one 1g or less. Lower is not always better for your vinyl either; it still needs to track well. I do everything in my abilities to asure that; the armboard rails will allow to set the spindle distance perfectly for any tonearm. And any cartridge will wear out from usage (500h if you're unlucky; 1000-2000h for a good one), that's why I do not want to use the overly expensive one unless I really have the time and silence to listen to it.

    Meanwhile I seem to have solved the rail collision issue, at least as far as the arm base is considered. Still have to check whether everything now also clears the platter.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  25. #1285
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,190
    I pulled the carpet from the upper flight of steps this morning, and pried free enough of the the carpet on the landing to get accurate measurements of all the rises. It's consistent, except for the too-short rise below the intermediate landing and the too-high first rise above it. I can fix that by laying a piece of proboard underlayment. To my great relief, I realized that I had misread the rules about the nosing dimensions. The 14 mm max refers to the amount of bevel or rounding, and not the total projection. So I figure that the same projection could have been achieved by not cutting the stringers as deep but fitting the treads before the risers. Whatever... I should be able to cap the original treads, which I'm okay with if I find a good product.

    And now I've decided to replace not just the upstairs hallway flooring, but all the bedrooms too. Which means I'll paint everything, and install new baseboards, door and window trim. By and by I've convinced myself that anything less is a half measure.

  26. #1286
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    16,143
    Congratulations with your new house!
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  27. #1287
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,796

    Adventures in DIY

    I began the box innards today with a partial liner upon which the keepsake tray will sit. The pieces are held in place with interlocking rabbets and a friction fit. No need for glue.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I started on the tray, too but mis-cut a piece and donít have enough lacewood long enough to make another. So, Iíll use some already milled maple, and make the bottom panel from lacewood.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2021-Apr-05 at 03:40 PM. Reason: Replaced oversize images
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  28. #1288
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,796

    Adventures in DIY

    Take 2 on the tray. I got everything cut, milled, sanded, and glued up. Just out of the clamps:



    Because very narrow pieces are a pain to stand on end in the box joint jig, I made the sides wider than planned and Iíll trim them down in the next steps.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2021-Apr-05 at 02:02 AM.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  29. #1289
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,143
    Looking at your woodwork and mine, I'm joining ranks with Trebuchet. I'm a carpenter. At best.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  30. #1290
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
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    16,839
    If I was a carpenter....!

    I woke up a little early this morning and spent about half an hour in bed cooking up a ridiculously complicated plan for part of my current project. Unlike those that come to me in dreams, it'll probably work. I need to get it written down.

    ETA: Regarding my carpentry skills, they are still pretty minimal. But a couple of orders of magnitude better than before I started building catapults! Before, I was largely unable to drive a nail. I probably still can't, but do everything with screws!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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