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Thread: Adventures in DIY

  1. #1021
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I quite like the frame. It sets off the map very nicely.



    That's why I take the lazy approach of cutting spline slots after gluing the miters, as in my last frame project. Of course, that method doesn't lend itself to understated splines as in your project.
    I may do that after gaining confidence with the gluing. As it was, I wanted the splines in place to help hold it all together.

  2. #1022
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Wow, that wormiest piece does have a lot of character. Have you considered filling the voids with epoxy? How punky is it?
    If I understand the term 'punky' correctly, it's not too bad. I believe epoxy would work. But no, I hadn't thought of that.

  3. #1023
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    I first heard "punky" when my late father-in-law was helping me build a fence. Around four decades ago. It kind of works. We wound up with only just enough non-punky material to finish the job.
    Al was kind of a cool guy. When he came to build the fence, he brought his thermos and lunchbox, just like he did to work. I miss him, and he's been gone at least 25 years.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #1024
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    I really like my Sawstop table saw. Although a bit pricey, it's worth every penny. Easy to use and doesn't seem to require any adjustments (so far), unlike the last saw I had which would seemingly out of the blue regularly demand that I adjust the trunnions.

    So, today I was going to use it to make some dado cuts for the first time. The dado blades are smaller in diameter than the regular blades so I figured I needed to disable the safety system (the fancy and expensive brake cartridge) in order for it to run. Well, no. I'm sure other Sawstop users already knew this: not only can you not disable the safety system when the machine has an error code (as it does when the blade is not close enough to the brake cartridge, as it isn't with the smaller dado blades) but you can't adjust the standard cartridge to accommodate the smaller blades. You need a separate dado cartridge, which I don't have. Gah.

    I'm sure someone already informed me of this; maybe even here on this forum. But I forgot. I even have a blank zero-clearance dado insert ready to go. Amazon!

  5. #1025
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    I don't remember if I mentioned the need for the dado brake cartridge but, yeah...gotta. Not only does it accommodate the smaller diameter, it's also designed to handle the additional width and mass of the stack. On another forum, several of us had a tough time explaining to "Mr. NewbieMaster Woodworker" that he shouldn't just buy a 10" dado stack and use the standard brake, which is only rated for a 3/16" maximum kerf.

    And as with military kit, two brakes are one. One is none.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #1026
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    Latest version of 'you can't have too many clamps'. My trinket chest made out of walnut. I decided not use the 'wormy' piece - I'll save that for later.

    I was initially concerned that I didn't have a way to ensure it was square during glue-up but then realized I could sandwich it in between two right-angle positioning thingies. Worked fine.

    Also, obligatory cat assistant photo.

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  7. #1027
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    I'm replacing the brakes on my car. One of my coworkers told me: "I had a Dart. The brakes are easy." A second woman walked up to me a work and told me: "Hey, I used to do my daughter's brakes. Here is my number if you need anything." A third person lent me a really nice jack, wheel chocks, etc.

    I feel like I have a pit crew behind me.
    Solfe

  8. #1028
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    Depending on the car model, I've had cars that had very hard to replace brake pads, and some really easy. On the Porsche 944 you didn't even have to remove the calipers. I recently bought a pad spreader; no more brand new pads damaged from abused screwdrivers.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  9. #1029
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    I replaced front brakes and rotors on my truck a while back and it was easy. I’m no gear head by any means but I’ve done it a handful of times over the decades and some of them were real bears.

    I finished a quick-not-so-quick project today: a hanger for a piece of silk art. The woodworking was dead bang simple and was done in a snap. They pieces were literally two small sticks with grooves in them, with one having two small holes drilled for the cord to hang it by.

    The not-so-quickness was due to my wood choice: purple heart. Buy a piece of well aged lumber and it has a lovely, vibrant purple color. Cut it and it’s an ashy purple-tan-brown. It took a few days of exposure to air and light to regain good color. With further exposure to light (UV) it will eventually darken to a rich, brown-purple color. To forestall that, I sprayed it with a UV-resistant acrylic lacquer, then topped it with three coats of paste wax for some sheen. The silk is placed in the grooves with some window screen spline.



    The art piece is a hand dyed and leaf printed silk scarf that we picked up in Chelan during our trip last year and it finally has its place in our landing.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  10. #1030
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    Nice. I love that hanging scarf, and the entire arrangement on the landing wall.

    Have you used UV-resistant polyurethane?

  11. #1031
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Nice. I love that hanging scarf, and the entire arrangement on the landing wall.
    Thanks. Over the last few years, we've taken to picking up local art here and there and the landing seems to be the place that a lot of it...lands. While the scarf is 'local' only in terms of the Pacific Northwest (so I'm counting that) the raven prints and birch tree metal pieces are from artists in the Talkeetna area. The walrus jawbone sculpture and birch bowl are from Homer. A handful of others are here and there in the house.

    Not too surprisingly, this little project led to ideas for another. As I was getting The Wife's approval of my handiwork, we talked about me making new ones, perhaps in A&C style. Like I don't have enough to do!

    Have you used UV-resistant polyurethane?
    No. I haven't yet made anything for outdoor use yet so there hasn't been a real need. Maybe after we have the deck replaced.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  12. #1032
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    The day is nearly upon us...

    ...and that day is Thursday, when the contractor will be here to replace our boiler, water heater, and garage heater. Fortunately, it's not an emergency job. Everything is just old and tired, being original to the house built in 1984, and we've been talking about upgrading for years. The platform is old and tired, too and it's my job to build a new one. The new platform is shorter, left-to-right, since the new boiler is narrower than the old unit and we're replacing two 40-gallon gas-fired water heaters with a single indirect model. It's deeper, front-to-back, because the new boiler requires more clearance from the wall in order to meet code.

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    I finished buying materials Saturday, got it all cut to size, and counterbored/pre-drilled the fastener holes. On Sunday, I assembled the substructure upside-down on a pair of saw horses using lag screws and construction adhesive, then gave it a quick wipedown with boiled linseed oil. I flipped it onto its legs, glued and screwed the decking in place, and laid some vinyl composite tile on top of that. All that remains is to flush trim the tile, install some trim to conceal and protect the plywood/tile edges, and apply a coat of water-repellant finish. Being of 2x6 and 4x4 construction with 10 crossmembers, this thing is an over-engineered, six-legged beast. I know because my aching back tells me it's so.

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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  13. #1033
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    ...and that day is Thursday, when the contractor will be here to replace our boiler, water heater, and garage heater. Fortunately, it's not an emergency job. Everything is just old and tired, being original to the house built in 1984, and we've been talking about upgrading for years. The platform is old and tired, too and it's my job to build a new one. The new platform is shorter, left-to-right, since the new boiler is narrower than the old unit and we're replacing two 40-gallon gas-fired water heaters with a single indirect model. It's deeper, front-to-back, because the new boiler requires more clearance from the wall in order to meet code.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Boiler Bench 30-inch.jpg 
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    I finished buying materials Saturday, got it all cut to size, and counterbored/pre-drilled the fastener holes. On Sunday, I assembled the substructure upside-down on a pair of saw horses using lag screws and construction adhesive, then gave it a quick wipedown with boiled linseed oil. I flipped it onto its legs, glued and screwed the decking in place, and laid some vinyl composite tile on top of that. All that remains is to flush trim the tile, install some trim to conceal and protect the plywood/tile edges, and apply a coat of water-repellant finish. Being of 2x6 and 4x4 construction with 10 crossmembers, this thing is an over-engineered, six-legged beast. I know because my aching back tells me it's so.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Now that is a strong platform, it looks like it could support the whole house not just the heaters. But,asking as a complete foreigner, why couldn't they just be placed directly onto the concrete floor?

  14. #1034
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Now that is a strong platform, it looks like it could support the whole house not just the heaters. But,asking as a complete foreigner, why couldn't they just be placed directly onto the concrete floor?
    Because building codes.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #1035
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Because building codes.
    Ah, thank you - I said I was a foreigner Codes says 'do it' - you 'do it'.

  16. #1036
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    Putting it all on the floor was an option...not a code issue...but I like being able to squirrel a few things away underneath it, so: new platform. And yes, I deliberately over-built it because I respect the weight of water. I kept aquaria, after all. The last thing I wanted was a weakness to crop up after the installation...and...ya know...earthquakes. I’m not a mechanical engineer and this is costing enough up front as it is.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  17. #1037
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Putting it all on the floor was an option...not a code issue...but I like being able to squirrel a few things away underneath it, so: new platform. And yes, I deliberately over-built it because I respect the weight of water. I kept aquaria, after all. The last thing I wanted was a weakness to crop up after the installation...and...ya know...earthquakes. I’m not a mechanical engineer and this is costing enough up front as it is.
    Thanks. I have to admit that with plenty of water involved erring on the side of caution seems sensible.

  18. #1038
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    Does it have a lip around the edges to catch any water leakage from running straight onto the floor?

  19. #1039
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    No, each unit will sit in its own catch pan.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  20. #1040
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    What sort of garage heater are you planning?

  21. #1041
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    Perhaps 15 years ago, one of my co-workers needed a new water heater in an older house and the city not only required it to be put on a platform, in a catch pan, but to have the catch pan plumbed into a drain. The latter was awkward. The water heater wound up costing far less than the installation.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #1042
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    Adventures in DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    What sort of garage heater are you planning?
    Along the lines of what we discussed earlier in the thread, it’ll be a low-profile hydronic unit from Modine: the Hot Dawg. It’s supposed to be much quieter than the current unit.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2020-Feb-11 at 06:41 PM.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  23. #1043
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Along the lines of what we discussed earlier in the thread, it’ll be a low-profile hydronic unit from Modine: the Hot Dawg. It’s supposed to be much quieter than the current unit.
    Ah yes. My memory is not so good.

  24. #1044
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    Here's what I've been working on: a small trinket chest. For scale, the top measures about 9 x 5.5 inches.

    It's black walnut made from wood salvaged from a tree cut down years ago near my house in Atlanta. Because the scraps I salvaged were cut with a chainsaw, most of the work has been resawing, planing and sizing the extremely rough cuts into pieces I could use. Frankly, I'm not sure its worth the effort (as opposed to buying stock walnut) but the project is a gift and the provenance of the wood will have meaning for the recipients.

    I'm also still learning. I'm building this according to a plan which has dimensions for all the pieces. My first step was to cut all the pieces except for the top and bottom to size, and then do the router/dado/assembly work. That was a mistake. I should have built the case first and then cut the drawer pieces to size based on the dimensions of the built case, not to the plan dimensions. Small errors in sizing have resulted in drawers just a touch too loose. Not enough to scrap the drawers and start over but enough that I see how I could have done it better. I also think the top and bottom are a 1/4 inch or so too wide, even though they match the plan dimensions. I could cut the top down but the bottom already has the apron pieces permanently attached. So it's good enough. I can't spend all year on this.

    It's not done. I have to do the sanding and finishing (amber shellac), attach the top and bottom the the case and line the drawer bottoms with felt or something.

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  25. #1045
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    Been there, done that with cutting by plan. It's hard for me to tell due to perspective but I think I agree with you on the top proportions. But that's always a judgment call. I've seen a lot of A&C designs in which such proportions seemed absurd to me.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  26. #1046
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    Woot! We have heat and hot water again. The guys put in a 12-hour day, overcame some hurdles, and got the job done right. A professional installation that is far superior to what we had.



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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

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